Environmental Decision Making (environmental + decision_making)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Public Participation in Environmental Decision Making: Is It Working?

NATIONAL CIVIC REVIEW, Issue 2 2002
Matthew McKinney
[source]


Case Study: Chemical Screening at Eastman Kodak Company

ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2001
Michele Ochsner
This case study is the final installment in a four-part series profiling environmental decision making at leading companies. 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. [source]


Valuation of ecological resources: integration of ecology and socioeconomics in environmental decision making edited by Ralph G. Stahl, Jr., Lawrence A. Kapustka, Wayne R. Munns, Jr., and Randall J.F. Bruins

INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2009
Matthew T. Heberling
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Application of multicriteria decision analysis in environmental decision making

INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT, Issue 2 2005
Gregory A. Kiker
Abstract Decision making in environmental projects can be complex and seemingly intractable, principally because of the inherent trade-offs between sociopolitical, environmental, ecological, and economic factors. The selection of appropriate remedial and abatement strategies for contaminated sites, land use planning, and regulatory processes often involves multiple additional criteria such as the distribution of costs and benefits, environmental impacts for different populations, safety, ecological risk, or human values. Some of these criteria cannot be easily condensed into a monetary value, partly because environmental concerns often involve ethical and moral principles that may not be related to any economic use or value. Furthermore, even if it were possible to aggregate multiple criteria rankings into a common unit, this approach would not always be desirable because the ability to track conflicting stakeholder preferences may be lost in the process. Consequently, selecting from among many different alternatives often involves making trade-offs that fail to satisfy 1 or more stakeholder groups. Nevertheless, considerable research in the area of multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) has made available practical methods for applying scientific decision theoretical approaches to complex multicriteria problems. This paper presents a review of the available literature and provides recommendations for applying MCDA techniques in environmental projects. A generalized framework for decision analysis is proposed to highlight the fundamental ingredients for more structured and tractable environmental decision making. [source]


Multi-attribute value theory as a framework for conflict resolution in river rehabilitation

JOURNAL OF MULTI CRITERIA DECISION ANALYSIS, Issue 2-3 2005
Markus Hostmann
Abstract Decision making in environmental projects is usually complex because of heterogeneous stakeholder interests, multiple objectives, long planning and implementation processes, and uncertain outcomes. Conflicting stakeholder interests in particular are often an important impediment to the realization and success of projects. Multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) methods are potentially useful for facilitating conflict resolution among stakeholder groups. However, some studies that have applied MCDA methods indicate that users are often skeptical about the value of MCDA methods and prefer the freedom of unaided decision making. We examine whether and how multi-attribute value theory (MAVT), a particular kind of MCDA, facilitates conflict resolution in environmental projects. Therefore, the MAVT method is applied to a specific river rehabilitation project in Switzerland (Thur River). The main questions are: (1) Can the MAVT method predict the final preferences of stakeholders and therefore anticipate conflicts at an early stage? (2) Do stakeholders reconsider and change their preferences after using the MAVT method? (3) If they do, does this result in more consensus-oriented decisions? We find that the principal advantage of the method in our case was not the prediction of stakeholders' final preferences, but rather the methods' ability to facilitate more consensus-oriented decisions. The paper discusses possible reasons for this finding and concludes with recommendations for future applications of the MAVT method in environmental decision making. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Judgmental Discounting and Environmental Risk Perception: Dimensional Similarities, Domain Differences, and Implications for Sustainability

JOURNAL OF SOCIAL ISSUES, Issue 1 2007
Alexander Gattig
Environmental risks constitute a special category of risks because they often involve consequences that are highly uncertain, strongly delayed, occurring at distant places, and,therefore,mostly borne by others. Economic, decision,theoretic, and psychological research about the way people deal with such consequences is reviewed. Two major findings are presented: first, there is evidence that discounting mechanisms are stable across different preference dimensions (uncertainty, temporal, spatial, and social distance). Second, discount rates tend to vary across different problem domains (e.g., environmental vs. health vs. financial risks). In particular, it appears that temporal discounting is less pronounced for environmental risks than in other domains. Several factors are identified that affect the nature of the risk evaluation process, and it is argued that environmental risks differ from other risks on such factors. These environmental-risk characteristics may have important implications for policy strategies to promote environmental sustainability. Contrary to other domains, appealing to the public's long-term preferences may be successful. Also in policy making, insights from standard economic decision theory to environmental decision making should be applied with caution. [source]