Environmental Action (environmental + action)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The Environmental Health Engagement Profile: What People Think and Do About Environmental Health

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 5 2009
Jane K. Dixon
ABSTRACT Objectives: To develop and validate the Environmental Health Engagement Profile (EHEP),an instrument for assessing the way people engage with environmental health issues, including people's experience of environmental health hazards, the assumptions concerning the risks involved, and the actions taken either individually or collectively in their communities. Design and Sample: This instrument development study was conducted in an urban area with varying levels of health-related environmental concerns. First, qualitative interviews with 41 residents informed development of items. Next, the items were evaluated by 28 expert reviewers. Finally, validity was assessed from responses of 433 residents who completed the instrument and other measures by telephone interview. Measures: For assessing validity of EHEP, data were also collected concerning demographic characteristics, social involvements, goodness of life, and self-ratings of health. Results: Through factor analysis, 5 subscales were identified,named Pollution Sensitivity Scale (,=.91), Pollution-Causes-Illness Scale (,=.84), Pollution Acceptance Scale (,=.67), Community Environment Action Scale (,=.79), and Personal Environmental Action Scale (,=.63). Patterns of correlations of these scales with age, and measures of odor sensitivity, social involvement, and goodness of life provided evidence of construct validity. Conclusions: These results provide beginning evidence for the reliability and validity of the EHEP. Thus, public health nurses and others may use this instrument to assess people's concerns about environmental health, and resulting actions,and to support strategies for advising people and communities on protecting their health. [source]


Environmental behaviour in Chicago automotive repair micro-enterprises (MEPs)

BUSINESS STRATEGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, Issue 3 2008
Debby F. Mir
Abstract This study analyzes the relationship between internal and external factors that influence environmental behaviour in traditional service micro-enterprises, focusing on Chicago motor vehicle repair (MVR) firms five years after the Clean Break amnesty program and subsequent inspections of MVR firms. The survey explored the influence of firm and manager characteristics, government intervention, and market and social pressures and opportunities on environmental awareness and action. Environmental action was significantly higher in older firms (more experienced owners) and in auto-refinishing firms practicing spray painting. While awareness levels were mixed for dealerships and franchises (contracted to larger organizations), environmental action was good for six out of the seven firms, which may reflect expectations for higher professional rather than environmental standards. However, environmental awareness and behaviour levels were mixed for trade association members. Owners obtain most environmental information from suppliers and government agencies, but confuse government responsibilities and attribute greater authority to non-environmental agencies. Finally, micro-enterprises avoid voluntary environmental compliance programs and prefer targeted enforcement and insurance requirements that promote a level playing field. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment. [source]


THE ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF VOLUNTARY ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF FIRMS: A CRITICAL REVIEW

JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC SURVEYS, Issue 3 2009
Esther Blanco
Abstract New trends in studies on the governance of natural assets include substantial consideration of the role of voluntary initiatives. A traditional economic view states that there is a trade-off between being green and being competitive. According to that view, no voluntary environmental action is expected to occur. To undertake an in-depth analysis of the scope for voluntary action, this paper reviews empirical literature that analyzes the relationship between manufacturing firms' environmental initiatives or performance and economic results. This review moves beyond the general test of the ,pay to be green' hypothesis, preferring instead to systematize empirical results in more specific research questions. Empirical findings of the reviewed literature generally support that there is no penalty for being green. In addition, the typology of firms, the methods utilized for implementing environmental initiatives, the intensity of abatement efforts and stockholders' valuation of green firms have all been shown to have a sizeable influence on the actual economic results of environmental action or management. Consequently, the findings of this paper challenge the traditional strategic theory that predicts widespread free-riding; it holds major implications for environmental policy-making and environmental business decisions. [source]


Fitting Ethics to the Land: H. Richard Niebuhr's Ethic of Responsibility and Ecotheology

JOURNAL OF RELIGIOUS ETHICS, Issue 2 2002
Judith N. Scoville
Much of ecotheology and environmental philosophy has moved deductively from theological and ethical constructs to questions of how we should relate to the natural world. Such approaches are limited in their ability to guide us toward appropriate environmental action for they do not necessarily fit the way the natural world actually functions. Niebuhr's ethic of response, on the other hand, begins with the concrete situation and is inherently ecological for it focuses on interrelationships in an on-going community. It is inductive in character and open to being informed by new findings in the natural and social sciences; thus it is exceptionally well suited to environmental problems, which involve complex scientific, social, and economic questions. [source]


Green Clubs and Voluntary Governance: ISO 14001 and Firms' Regulatory Compliance

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE, Issue 2 2005
Matthew Potoski
Voluntary programs have become widespread tools for governments and nongovernmental actors looking to improve industry's environmental and regulatory performance. Voluntary programs can be conceptualized as club goods that provide nonrival but potentially excludable benefits to members. For firms, the value of joining a green club over taking the same actions unilaterally is to appropriate the club's positive brand reputation. Our analysis of about 3,700 U.S. facilities indicates that joining ISO 14001, an important nongovernmental voluntary program, improves facilities' compliance with government regulations. We conjecture that ISO 14001 is effective because its broad positive standing with external audiences provides a reputational benefit that helps induce facilities to take costly progressive environmental action they would not take unilaterally. [source]


Environmental behaviour in Chicago automotive repair micro-enterprises (MEPs)

BUSINESS STRATEGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, Issue 3 2008
Debby F. Mir
Abstract This study analyzes the relationship between internal and external factors that influence environmental behaviour in traditional service micro-enterprises, focusing on Chicago motor vehicle repair (MVR) firms five years after the Clean Break amnesty program and subsequent inspections of MVR firms. The survey explored the influence of firm and manager characteristics, government intervention, and market and social pressures and opportunities on environmental awareness and action. Environmental action was significantly higher in older firms (more experienced owners) and in auto-refinishing firms practicing spray painting. While awareness levels were mixed for dealerships and franchises (contracted to larger organizations), environmental action was good for six out of the seven firms, which may reflect expectations for higher professional rather than environmental standards. However, environmental awareness and behaviour levels were mixed for trade association members. Owners obtain most environmental information from suppliers and government agencies, but confuse government responsibilities and attribute greater authority to non-environmental agencies. Finally, micro-enterprises avoid voluntary environmental compliance programs and prefer targeted enforcement and insurance requirements that promote a level playing field. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment. [source]


Corporate Governance and Social Responsibility: a comparative analysis of the UK and the US,

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE, Issue 3 2006
Ruth V. Aguilera
This paper argues that key differences between the UK and the US in the importance ascribed to a company's social responsibilities (CSR) reflect differences in the corporate governance arrangements in these two countries. Specifically, we analyse the role of a salient type of owner in the UK and the US, institutional investors, in emphasising firm-level CSR actions. We explore differences between institutional investors in the UK and the US concerning CSR, and draw on a model of instrumental, relational and moral motives to explore why institutional investors in the UK are becoming concerned with firms' social and environmental actions. We conclude with some suggestions for future research in this area. [source]