Dental Visits (dental + visit)

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Medical Sciences

Kinds of Dental Visits

  • last dental visit


  • Selected Abstracts


    Dental visits by Australian preschool children

    JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, Issue 6 2003
    LM Slack-Smith
    Objective: To provide population-based data on dental visits in preschool children, to assist in the planning of such services and preventive programs. Methodology: Dental visits in young children are described and associated factors are investigated using data from the 1995 National Health Survey. Results: Thirty-eight per cent of children aged 3,4 years had ever visited a dental professional with 31% having visited a dental professional in the previous 12 months (total n = 1596). Factors associated with having ever visited a dental professional included age in years (,2 = 74.16, P < 0.0001), state of residence (,2 = 25.81, P= 0.0005) and private health insurance (,2 = 7.96, P= 0.005). Similar factors were associated with visits in last 12 months. Western Australia had the lowest proportion of preschool children aged 3,4 years having ever visited a dental professional (29%) while South Australia had the highest proportion (48%). The major reasons given for dental visits were check-up and fillings. Conclusion: Data regarding children not as likely to attend dental services can be used to target services and assist in ensuring preschool children receive appropriate dental care. [source]


    Oral health conditions of community-dwelling cognitively intact elderly persons with disabilities

    GERODONTOLOGY, Issue 2 2007
    Ralph Saunders
    Objectives:, To present descriptive information on oral health and health care of community-dwelling elderly persons with disabilities who are living at home. Background:, Most previous studies have focused on specific subpopulations, namely, persons who are essentially healthy and independent, are homebound, or are nursing home residents. Little information appears to be available on community-residing elderly persons with disabilities. Materials and methods:, A total of 641 participants aged 65 years and over in a Medicare Demonstration who were cognitively intact, completed an oral health questionnaire within 1 year of Demonstration entry. Demonstration participants were required to be living in the community, need or receive help with 2+ activities of daily living (ADLs) or 3+ instrumental ADLs (IADLs), and have recently experienced significant health services utilisation. Results:, Subject mean age was 79.1 years, 73.8% were female, and 4% were minority. They were dependent in a mean of 1.8 ADLs and 2.9 IADLs. 43.1% reported that they had no natural teeth, 77.4% had dentures, 58.8% frequently felt their mouth was dry, 5.2% had jaw pain now and 6.1% had at some time experienced burning sensations in their mouth or tongue. 40.4% reported that they were currently in need of dental treatment, although 56.2% indicated they now had a dentist, and 42.1% identified having a dental visit within the past 12 months. 19.7% indicated some dental insurance coverage. Conclusion:, This is one of the first studies to focus on community-dwelling elderly people with disabilities. Substantial oral health morbidity was reported. [source]


    The clinically related predictors of dental fear in Taiwanese children

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRIC DENTISTRY, Issue 6 2008
    CHEN-YI LEE
    Background. Dental fear has been singled out as one of the most troublesome problems facing paediatric dentistry today. Children with dental fear may avoid visiting dentists; therefore, their oral health protection is often compromised. However, the aetiology of dental fear is still not entirely understood. Objective. This study investigated the dental visiting habit, the previous dental experiences, the conditioning pathway, and the clinically related predictors of dental fear in children. Design., The dental history of 247 children (2,10 years old) was obtained when they came to a dental clinic for treatment. The level of dental fear in these children was assessed using the Children's Fear Survey Schedule,Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS). Observers rated the clinically anxious responses and uncooperative behaviour towards dental treatment in these children. Three stepwise regression analyses were performed to determine significant predictors of CFSS-DS score, clinically anxious responses, and uncooperative behaviour of children, respectively. Results. We found that the CFSS-DS score and clinical anxiety have different predictors, but age , 3.99 years old and cooperativeness in the first dental visit were important predictors for both the CFSS-DS score and the clinical anxiety. Furthermore, the other predictors of the CFSS-DS score were maternal dental fear, unbearable pain during the first dental visit, and visiting dentists in a regular dental clinic; the other predictors of clinical anxiety were first-born, regular dentist, and CFSS-DS score. Finally, the only significant predictor for uncooperative behaviour was clinical anxiety. Conclusion. Children's dental fear and their anxious response during dental treatment were dynamic processes that consisted of many different factors. The direct conditioning of subjective experience of pain was more important than the objective pathway of child dental fear, and the indirect conditioning does not seem influential in this study sample. [source]


    Oral health and related quality of life status in patients from UK and Turkey: a comparative study in Behcet's disease

    JOURNAL OF ORAL PATHOLOGY & MEDICINE, Issue 5 2009
    G. Mumcu
    Background:, The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare oral health-related quality of life (oral QoL) in patients from UK and Turkey with Behcet's disease (BD). Methods:, Thirty-one BD patients from UK (F/M: 18/13, mean age: 41.8 ± 11.5 years) and Turkey (F/M: 18/13, mean age: 41.5 ± 10.3) who were matched according to age and gender were included in the study. All patients had active oral ulcers. Oral QoL was assessed by Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14). Oral health was evaluated by dental and periodontal indices. Results:, No significant difference was found in OHIP-14 scores between patients from UK (22.7 ± 14.4) and Turkey (20.4 ± 14.3) (P = 0.709). The OHIP-14 score correlated with the healing time of oral ulcers in UK (r = 0.4, P = 0.04) and the number of oral ulcers in Turkey (r = 0.4, P = 0.012). The number of oral ulcers per month was significantly higher in UK (3.3 ± 2.8) compared with that in Turkey (1.5 ± 2.5) (P = 0.014). However, the number of filled teeth and frequency of tooth brushing were significantly lower in patients from Turkey compared with those in UK (P = 0.000). Similarly, the duration since the last dental visit (5.1 ± 7.2 months) was significantly lower in UK compared with that in Turkey (28.6 ± 23.7 months) (P = 0.000). Conclusions:, Oral QoL was similar in patients from UK and Turkey with active oral ulcers. However, the number of oral ulcers was observed to be higher in UK. As expected, a lower utilization rate of dental services might have led to a poorer oral health in patients from Turkey. [source]


    Influences of social support on the oral health of older people in Britain

    JOURNAL OF ORAL REHABILITATION, Issue 10 2002
    Colman McGrath
    summary, A national UK study involving a random sample of 876 non-institutionalized older people (aged 65 or older) were recruited, to identify the association between social support (living alone), self-reported oral health status and oral health behaviour (use of services). Home interviews were undertaken exploring oral health behaviour (time and reason for last dental visit) and oral health status measures (self-reported number of teeth possessed and denture status). In addition, socio-demographic characteristics were collected. Bivariate analysis identified that social support was associated with time since last dental visit (P < 0·01), reason for last dental visit (P < 0·01), self-reported number of teeth possessed (P < 0·01) and denture status (P < 0·01). In regression analysis, social support emerged as an important predictor of reason for last dental visit and denture status having accounted for other factors in the model (age, gender, social class and educational attainment). Social support is associated with oral health status and oral health behaviour of older people in Britain and is likely to influence both the decision making process of when to seek dental care and what type of treatment to opt for. [source]


    Early childhood caries: Current evidence for aetiology and prevention

    JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, Issue 1-2 2006
    Mark G Gussy
    Background: Despite the fact that it is largely preventable, dental caries (decay) remains one of the most common chronic diseases of early childhood. Dental decay in young children frequently leads to pain and infection necessitating hospitalization for dental extractions under general anaesthesia. Dental problems in early childhood have been shown to be predictive of not only future dental problems but also on growth and cognitive development by interfering with comfort nutrition, concentration and school participation. Objective: To review the current evidence base in relation to the aetiology and prevention of dental caries in preschool-aged children. Methods: A search of MEDLINE, CINALH and Cochrane electronic databases was conducted using a search strategy which restricted the search to randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, clinical trials, systematic reviews and other quasi-experimental designs. The retrieved studies were then limited to articles including children aged 5 years and under and published in English. The evidence of effectiveness was then summarized by the authors. Conclusions: The review highlighted the complex aetiology of early childhood caries (ECC). Contemporary evidence suggests that potentially effective interventions should occur in the first 2 years of a child's life. Dental attendance before the age of 2 years is uncommon; however, contact with other health professionals is high. Primary care providers who have contact with children well before the age of the first dental visit may be well placed to offer anticipatory advice to reduce the incidence of ECC. [source]


    Prevalence and Severity of Dental Caries in Adolescents Aged 12 and 15 Living in Communities with Various Fluoride Concentrations

    JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 1 2007
    América Patricia Pontigo-Loyola DrO
    Abstract Objectives: To determine the experience, prevalence, and severity of dental caries in adolescents naturally exposed to various fluoride concentrations. Methods: A cross-sectional census was conducted on 1,538 adolescents aged 12 and 15 years living at high altitude above sea level (>2,000 m or >6,560 ft) in above-optimal fluoridated communities (levels ranging from 1.38 to 3.07 ppm) of Hidalgo, Mexico. Sociodemographic and socioeconomic data were collected using questionnaires. Two previously trained and standardized examiners performed the dental exams. Results: Caries prevalence was 48.6 percent and mean of decay, missing, and filling teeth (DMFT) for the whole population was 1.15 ± 1.17. In terms of severity, 9.6 percent of the adolescents had DMFT , 4, and 1.7 percent had ,7. The significant caries index (SiC) was 2.41 in the group of 12-year-olds, and 3.46 in the 15-year-olds. Higher experience and prevalence were observed in girls, in children with dental visit in the past year, those in the wealthiest socioeconomic status (SES) (quartiles 2, 3, and 4), those whose locale of residence is in San Marcos and Tula Centro, and in fluorosis-free children and those with moderate/severe fluorosis. In an analysis of caries severity (DMFT , 4), both adolescents with very mild/mild and moderate/severe dental fluorosis have higher caries severity. Conclusions: The results indicated that caries experience, prevalence, and severity as well as SiC index among 12- and 15-year-old adolescents were relatively low. Sociodemographic and socioeconomic variables commonly associated with dental caries were also observed in Mexican adolescents. Unlike other studies, we found that caries increased with higher SES. Fluoride exposure (measured through fluorosis presence) does not appear to be reducing the caries prevalence (DMFT > 0) or caries severity (DMFT , 4) in these high-altitude communities. [source]


    Demographic Factors Associated with Dental Utilization Among Community Dwelling Elderly in the United States, 1997

    JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 1 2006
    Daniel D. Skaar DDS
    Abstract Objectives: The purpose of this study was to characterize dental service utilization in 1997 by community dwelling Medicare beneficiaries. Methods: The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, or MCBS, is a continuous annual series of nationally representative surveys of Medicare beneficiaries. Univariate comparisons were made between dependent variables (dental utilization and types of dental services) by each of the independent variables (age group, gender, race, income, education, population density, marital status and US Census Bureau regions using weighted proportions to test for independence between dependent and independent variables. Results: Overall, an estimated 41% of the population had a dental visit. Although utilization declined with aging, 24% of those 85 and older visited a dentist. Conclusions: This descriptive study provides important information about dental utilization and services in the American elderly population. Younger, high income, white or educated elderly Americans had higher dental utilization. [source]


    Dental Insurance and Clinical Dental Outcomes in NHANES III

    JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 4 2005
    Tonya R. Stancil PhD
    Abstract Objectives: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) 1988,1994 is one of the few nationally representative data sets with information on both private dental insurance and a clinical dental exam. The objective of this analysis was to examine the possible associations between private dental insurance and clinical exam outcomes, demographic variables, and dental visits. Methods: Using NHANES III data, analysis was limited to persons aged 20 years or older who had a dental exam and reported on their private dental insurance status. Initial analyses were based on comparisons between those with and without private dental insurance. Propensity scoring method was used to examine the effects of dental insurance on clinical exam variables. Results: The percentage of individuals with private dental insurance was significantly greater among non-Hispanic blacks, those with higher educational attainment, those living at/above the federal poverty level, and those with a dental visit in the past year compared to their respective counterparts. Those with untreated caries, those with a loss of attachment of greater than 4 mm, and those with 12,27 missing teeth were significantly less likely to have dental insurance (p<0.05) than their respective counterparts. Conclusions: These results suggest that having private dental insurance is associated with better clinical oral health status. [source]


    The Impact of HIV on Oral Health and Subsequent Use of Dental Services

    JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 2 2003
    Aram Dobalian PhD
    Abstract Objective: This study examined differences in health and access to dental services among a nationally representative sample of patients with HIV using Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use. Methods: This investigation is a longitudinal study that used structural equation modeling to analyze data from the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study, a probability sample of 2,864 adults under treatment for HIV infection. Key predisposing variables included sex, drug use, race/ethnicity, education, and age. Enabling factors included income, insurance, and regular source of care. Need factors included mental, physical, and oral health. Dependent variables included whether a respondent utilized dental services and number of visits. Results: More education, dental insurance, usual source of dental care, and poor oral health predicted a higher probability of having a dental visit. African Americans, Hispanics, those exposed to HIV through drug use or heterosexual contact, and those in poor physical health were less likely to have a dental visit. Of those who visited dental professionals, older persons, those with dental insurance, and those in worse oral health had more visits. African Americans and persons in poor mental health had fewer visits. Conclusions: Persons with more HIV-related symptoms and a diagnosis of AIDS have a greater need for dental care than those with fewer symptoms and without AIDS, but more pressing needs for physical and mental health services limit their access to dental services. Providers should better attend to the oral health needs of persons with HIV who are in poor physical and mental health. [source]


    An Exploratory Qualitative Study Examining the Social and Psychological Processes Involved in Regular Dental Attendance

    JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 1 2000
    Barry J. Gibson BSc, MMedSc
    Abstract Objective: This study aimed to provide a description of the psychosocial process involved in regular dental attendance. Methods: The study design was a qualitative cross-sectional study using unstructured and semistructured interviews and observations of regular dental visits. The study participants included 12 men and 18 women attending general dental practices and six men and four women attending an emergency dental service. The data were systematically recorded and subjected to line-by-line grounded theory coding around the main concerns of those attending the dentist. Results: The main concern of those attending for a regular dental visit was checking their oral health. The six-month recall was conceptualized as a checking cycle in six phases: recalling, responding, inducing (i), waiting, inducing (ii), and telling. The possible outcomes of the cycle were maintaining oral health, sustaining oral health, and a further checking cycle. Variations in checking cycles resulted from reordering and normalizing pressures within participants' lifestyles. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that people's patterns of dental attendance are similar to those of other chronic illnesses. An understanding of the dynamic psychosocial processes involved in frequent dental attendance may be achieved when further research into this phenomenon is conducted. [source]


    Dental health status of liver transplant candidates

    LIVER TRANSPLANTATION, Issue 2 2007
    James Guggenheimer
    A prerequisite dental evaluation is usually recommended for potential organ transplant candidates. This is based on the premise that untreated dental disease may pose a risk for infection and sepsis, although there is no evidence that this has occurred in organ transplant candidates or recipients. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental disease and oral health behaviors in a sample of liver transplant candidates (LTCs). Oral examinations were conducted on 300 LTCs for the presence of gingivitis, dental plaque, dental caries, periodontal disease, edentulism, and xerostomia. The prevalence of these conditions was compared with oral health data from national health surveys and examined for possible associations with most recent dental visit, smoking, and type of liver disease. Significant risk factors for plaque-related gingivitis included intervals of more than 1 yr since the last dental visit (P = 0.004), smoking (P = 0.03), and diuretic therapy (P = 0.005). Dental caries and periodontal disease were also significantly associated with intervals of more than 1 yr since the last dental visit (P = 0.004). LTCs with viral hepatitis or alcoholic cirrhosis had the highest smoking rate (78.8%). Higher rates of edentulism occurred among older LTCs who were less likely to have had a recent dental evaluation (mean 88 months). In conclusion, intervals of more than 1 yr since the last dental visit, smoking, and diuretic therapy appear to be the most significant determinants of dental disease and the need for a pretransplantation dental screening evaluation in LTCs. Edentulous patients should have periodic examinations for oral cancer. Liver Transpl 13:280,286, 2007. © 2007 AASLD. [source]


    Access to dental care by young South Australian adults

    AUSTRALIAN DENTAL JOURNAL, Issue 3 2003
    KF Roberts-Thomson
    Abstract Background: Despite reported concern over the dental care of young adults little research has been done on their use of dental services in Australia. The aim of this study was to investigate the patterns of dental utilization of young South Australian adults aged 20,24 years. Methods: A random sample of 2300 young adults was selected from the electoral roll. Partial or complete addresses and possible phone numbers were obtained for 1921 persons. Telephone interviews were conducted for 1261 subjects to obtain information on socio-demographics, health behaviour and dental visiting (response rate 65.6 per cent). Results: One third of young adults (34 per cent) had not made a dental visit in the previous two years and 38 per cent usually visited for a problem rather than a check-up. Making a dental visit in the last two years was significantly associated with a number of socio-demographic variables including age and gender, with holders of private dental insurance and those who have not avoided care because of cost having higher odds of making a visit and males and government concession card holders having lower odds of visiting. Usual reason for visiting a dentist for a problem was significantly associated with no private dental insurance, holding a government concession card, no tertiary education and avoiding care because of cost. Conclusions: This study suggests that demographic and economic factors influenced use of dental services and reason for visiting of young South Australian adults. [source]


    Predictors of dental care utilization among working poor Canadians

    COMMUNITY DENTISTRY AND ORAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, Issue 3 2009
    V. E. Muirhead
    Abstract,,, Objective:, This study used the Gelberg,Andersen Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations to identify predictors of dental care utilization by working poor Canadians. Methods:, A cross-sectional stratified sampling study design and telephone survey methodology was used to collect data from a nationally representative sample of 1049 working poor individuals aged 18 to 64 years. Working poor persons worked ,20 h a week, were not full-time students and had annual family incomes <$34 300. A pretested questionnaire included sociodemographic items, self-reported oral health measures and two dental care utilization outcomes: time since their last dental visit and the usual reason for dental visits. Results:, Hierarchical stepwise logistic analyses identified independent predictors associated with visiting the dentist >1 year ago: male gender (OR = 1.63; P = 0.005), aged 25,34 years (OR = 2.05; P = 0.02), paying for dental care with cash or credit (OR = 2.31; P < 0.001), past welfare recipients (OR = 1.65; P = 0.03), <21 teeth (OR = 4.23; P < 0.001) and having a perceived need for dental treatment (OR=2.78; P < 0.001). Sacrificing goods or services to pay for dental treatment was associated with visiting the dentist within the past year. The predictors of visiting the dentist only when in pain/trouble were lone parent status (OR = 4.04; P < 0.001), immigrant status (OR = 1.72; P = 0.006), paying for dental care with cash or credit (OR = 2.71; P < 0.001), a history of an inability to afford dental care (OR = 1.62; P = 0.01), a satisfactory/poor/very poor self-rated oral health (OR = 2.10; P < 0.001), number of teeth <21 (OR = 2.58; P < 0.001) and having a perceived need for dental treatment (OR = 2.99; P < 0.001). Conclusions:, This study identified predisposing and enabling vulnerabilities that jeopardize the dental care-seeking practices of working poor persons. Dental care utilization was associated with relinquishing spending on other goods and services, which suggests that dental care utilization is a competing financial demand for economically constrained adults. [source]


    Parsimonious prediction model for the prevalence of dental visits

    COMMUNITY DENTISTRY AND ORAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, Issue 5 2008
    Hazem Seirawan
    Abstract,,, Objectives:, To analyze the prevalence of dental visits within the last year in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System or BRFSS (2003) national database by simple sociodemographic factors, and to predict prevalence in States that have not participated in BRFSS 2003. Methods:, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System is a cross-sectional telephone survey conducted by the state-level authorities in the United States and based on a standardized questionnaire to determine the distribution of risk behaviors and health practices among noninstitutionalized adults. A multivariable logistic regression model considers the complex sample design of the BRFSS was used to predict the prevalence of dental visits based on four nonclinic parsimonious variables. Results:, White race, high income (,$35 000), education above high school, and marital status were associated with an annual dental visit with odds ratios of 1.38, 2.09, 1.61, and 1.18, respectively. Utah had the highest percentage (78%) of estimated annual users, while ,Virgin Islands' had the lowest percentage (59%). The model's correct classification rate was 61.5%. Conclusions:, State and local governments, health promotion organizations, insurance companies, and organizations that administer public health programs (such as Medicare and Medicaid in the U.S.) will benefit by applying this model to the available nonclinical databases, and will be able to improve planning of dental health services and required dental workforce. [source]


    Oral and general health behaviours among Chinese urban adolescents

    COMMUNITY DENTISTRY AND ORAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, Issue 1 2008
    Poul Erik Petersen
    Abstract,,, Objectives:, The objectives of this study were to measure the association of general and oral health-related behaviours with living conditions and to explore the interrelationships between general and oral health-related behaviours in Chinese urban adolescents. Methods:, A cross-sectional survey of 2662 adolescents was conducted in eight Chinese provincial capitals. The response rate was 92%. The study population was selected through multistage cluster sampling and comprised three age groups: 11, 13 and 15 years. Data on oral and general health, lifestyles as well as living conditions were collected by means of self-administered structured questionnaires. Several additive indices were constructed from answers to the questions on specific behaviour, and participants were categorized according to scores on each component of health-related behaviour for statistical analyses by frequency distributions, regression analyses and factor analyses. Results:, Oral health-related behaviours among adolescents were associated with socioeconomic status of parents, school performance and peer relationships. The odds of a dental visit was 0.63 in adolescents of poorly educated parents and the corresponding figure for regular oral hygiene practices was 0.62. Odds of tobacco use was 3 for adolescents with poor performance in school while odds of consuming sugary foods/drinks was 1.3. Adolescents with high levels of preventive oral health practices also demonstrated general health-promoting behaviours. In factor analysis of general and oral health-related behaviours, three factors were isolated: (a) risk behaviours (loadings 0.48,0.66), (b) health-promoting behaviours (loadings 0.60,0.64) and (c) help-seeking behaviours (loadings 0.56,0.67). Conclusion:, The findings support a multidimensional model of health behaviour. Several approaches and multiple methods should be applied in oral health education in order to modify behaviours that affect oral health. [source]


    Testing the effect of including oral health in general health checks for elderly patients in medical practice , a randomized controlled trial

    COMMUNITY DENTISTRY AND ORAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, Issue 1 2007
    C. Lowe
    Abstract,,, Aim:, To test the feasibility and effectiveness of an oral health referral process for elderly patients (aged 75 years or over) attending a preventive health check (PHC) with their general medical practitioner. Objectives:, To evaluate the effectiveness of the process in increasing dental attendance at baseline and 6 months after the intervention. To identify key characteristics of those who accepted an oral health visit (OHV). To determine the proportion of people attending the OHV who required treatment and subsequently attended a dentist. Setting:, Three general medical practices in east Cheshire, UK. Design:, A randomized controlled trial. Method:, Elderly patients attending their general medical practice for PHCs were randomly assigned to a test group, who were invited to attend for an OHV, and to a control group, who received no intervention. Six months after the PHC the effectiveness of the process was measured. Results:, Some 50% of those invited for an OHV accepted. Those accepting were more likely to be edentulous, wear dentures or have a current oral health problem, than those declining. Regression analysis showed the best predictors of acceptance to be having a current dental problem or pain and not having a regular dentist. The mean time since their last dental visit was 8.1 years which was significantly longer than those declining the OHV. 63% of individuals attending the OHV were assessed as having a realistic treatment need and 70% of those referred went on to complete the course of treatment. In the test group a highly significant increase in reported dental visiting was found at sixth month evaluation. The primary care staff were happy to include the dental checklist and felt it was a valuable addition to the PHC. Conclusions:, The offer of an OHV was taken up most readily by those with current oral problems, or pain and those with no regular dentist. The inclusion of a dental checklist within the PHC for elderly patients together with help with arranging a dental appointment shows promise as a way of ensuring the dental needs of this group are met. [source]


    Dental fear in adults: a meta-analysis of behavioral interventions

    COMMUNITY DENTISTRY AND ORAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, Issue 4 2004
    Gerd Kvale
    Abstract , Objectives:, The aim of this meta-analytic and systematic quantitative approach is to examine the effects of behavioral interventions for dental anxiety and dental phobia. Methods:, Eighty studies were identified where dental fear treatment with behavioral methods was evaluated. Thirty-eight of 80 met entry criteria and were included in a meta-analysis. Results:, The calculated effect sizes (ESs) for self-reported anxiety after intervention indicate positive changes in 36 of the 38 studies and no changes in two. The overall ES = 1.8 (95% CI: 1.6, 1.8). The percent of subjects with post-treatment dental visits in the first 6 months post-treatment varied between 50 and 100%. The overall ES for attendance at dental visits, weighted by sample size, is 1.4 (95% CI: 1.3, 1.6). The homogeneity analysis indicates that the studies cannot be adequately described in one ES. The reported percentage of subjects with a dental visit between 6 months and 4 years post-treatment varied from 48 to 100%. The overall weighted ES for visiting the dentist, adjusted for drop-outs in the studies, is 1.2 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.4). Conclusions:, Despite extensive heterogeneity, changes in self-reported anxiety represent medium to large ESs. Patients signing up for a behavioral intervention for dental fear can be expected to report a significant reduction in their fear, and this effect generally seems to be lasting. Mean long-term attendance (>4 years after treatment) is 77%. [source]


    Consumption of dental services among adults in Denmark 1994,2003

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ORAL SCIENCES, Issue 3 2007
    Lisa B. Christensen
    The purpose of the present study was to measure the consumption of dental services among adults in Denmark and to analyze at what level socio-demographic/socio-economic factors influence dental attendance and oral examinations. A sample of 10% of the total population of 18 yr or older was randomly drawn from a population register, based on a cross-sectional design. Information on the use of dental services was retrieved from public registers along with data on gender, age-group, regions, ethnicity, education, marital status, and income. In addition, a cohort of persons was drawn from the sample in 1999 including only persons who were registered as residents in Denmark from 1999 to 2003. Over time, an increase in the number of dental visits and oral examinations was found among persons older than 45 yr, whereas a decrease was observed in the younger age-groups. Logistic regression analysis was applied to determine the effect of various variables on the experience of dental visits and oral examinations, and relatively high odds for dental attendance and oral examinations was found for the following: younger adults; women; married persons; high income; high education; and persons of Danish origin. The present dental healthcare system does not yet seem to have established mechanisms to address social inequalities in the consumption of dental services. [source]


    Attitudes and opinions of oral health and oral care among community-dwelling elderly subjects in Sweden: an interview study

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DENTAL HYGIENE, Issue 1 2004
    K Andersson
    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate attitudes and opinions of old, independently living people about their oral health and how it has affected them through life. Material and methods: A random selection of 12 individuals was made in a group of 79 individuals who earlier participated in a study about self-reported oral health. The average age was 78.4 years. An interview guide was used as support to focus on oral health. The respondents themselves decided what was important within the topics. The respondents were encouraged to speak freely about their childhood, family, social relations, memories from early dental care, general health situation, experience from health care, life and their future. The interviews were recorded and extended from 60 to 90 min. All of them were transcribed and analysed with phenomenological method inspired by Giogi. The analysis was made by two researchers independently. After 11 interviews, no new information was found; similar opinions, answers and stories recurred. Results: Seven of 11 respondents were born and grown up in the countryside and had moved to Stockholm in the forties. Awareness about dental care was generally low. Many of them have terrible memories from early dental visits, and the dentist was authoritarian and rough. Many had no memories of brushing their teeth as a child. Most of the respondents went to dentists as adults and when they could afford to pay by themselves. After retirement, all have continuous dental care and have visited a dental hygienist during the last 20 years. Nine of 11 have regular contact with a dental hygienist. Most of them are satisfied with their oral health and want to continue being clean and healthy in the mouth. Conclusions: Most of the respondents experienced an improved oral health, information and instructions from the dental hygienist have affected their self-care. Many tell that they have become more aware and carry out the oral hygiene more carefully after retirement. All of them experience that oral health affects the quality of life. [source]


    Periodontal disease among indigenous people in the Amazon rain forest

    JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PERIODONTOLOGY, Issue 11 2001
    Mauricio Ronderos
    Abstract Background: People are not all equally susceptible to periodontitis. To understand the epidemiology and natural history of this disease, it is important to study populations with varying genetic backgrounds and environmental exposures. Aim: Characterize the periodontal condition of a sample of indigenous adults in a remote region of the Amazon rain forest and determine the association of periodontal disease with various demographic, behavioral and environmental factors. Methods: A cross-sectional evaluation of 244 subjects aged 20,70 years was conducted. Pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP), plaque and calculus were assessed for the Ramfjord index teeth. Results: These people had high levels of plaque, calculus and BOP. The mean PD was rather shallow (2.45 mm in 20,29 year-olds to 2.73 mm in 50+ year-olds) and did not increase significantly with age. Mean CAL (0.57 mm in 20,29 year-olds and 2.26 mm in 50+ year-olds) and mean location of the free gingival margin in relation to the cemento-enamel junction changed significantly with age (p<0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed that increasing age, bleeding on probing and calculus scores were positively associated with mean CAL (p<0.01). Sex, ethnicity, level of modern acculturation, use of coca or tobacco paste, frequency of dental visits and plaque were not associated with mean CAL. Conclusions: Periodontal disease in these people was mainly associated with gingival recession rather than deep pockets. Most people had clinical attachment loss but despite poor oral hygiene and extensive gingival inflammation, they did not have very severe periodontal destruction. [source]


    Dental visits by Australian preschool children

    JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, Issue 6 2003
    LM Slack-Smith
    Objective: To provide population-based data on dental visits in preschool children, to assist in the planning of such services and preventive programs. Methodology: Dental visits in young children are described and associated factors are investigated using data from the 1995 National Health Survey. Results: Thirty-eight per cent of children aged 3,4 years had ever visited a dental professional with 31% having visited a dental professional in the previous 12 months (total n = 1596). Factors associated with having ever visited a dental professional included age in years (,2 = 74.16, P < 0.0001), state of residence (,2 = 25.81, P= 0.0005) and private health insurance (,2 = 7.96, P= 0.005). Similar factors were associated with visits in last 12 months. Western Australia had the lowest proportion of preschool children aged 3,4 years having ever visited a dental professional (29%) while South Australia had the highest proportion (48%). The major reasons given for dental visits were check-up and fillings. Conclusion: Data regarding children not as likely to attend dental services can be used to target services and assist in ensuring preschool children receive appropriate dental care. [source]


    Relationships Between Caregivers' Responses to Oral Health Screening Questions and Early Childhood Caries

    JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 4 2009
    Christopher R. Roberts DDS
    Abstract Objective: This study evaluated relationships between caregiver responses to oral health screening questions and caries in young children. Methods: Two samples of caregivers answered identical eight-item screening questionnaires about their oral health. One sample included children enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) who were 24 to 42 months of age; the other sample included 3- to 5-year-old children attending a pediatric dental clinic. Using chi-square and relative risk, questionnaire findings were related to children's caries history based on clinical caries exams. Results: Questions significantly (P < 0.05) related to children's caries in the older sample included caregivers' poorer rating of their oral health, less frequent dental visits, current or recent caries, and history of tooth loss due to caries. However, only questions pertaining to tooth loss were related to caries in the younger sample. Conclusion: Caregivers' reported loss of teeth due to caries was significantly associated with caries development in their children in both samples, and may be a useful means for early identification of children at high risk. [source]


    Dental Service Utilization among Urban and Rural Older Adults in China , A Brief Communication

    JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 3 2007
    Bei Wu PhD
    Abstract Objectives: China's health care system is bifurcated in nature between rural and urban areas. In addition, there is a huge gap in socioeconomic status between rural and urban residents. The purpose of the study was to examine the factors related to dental visits among elders in rural and urban areas of Shanghai, China. Methods: Using a stratified random sampling method, a cross-sectional, face-to-face survey was conducted among elders aged 60 years and above in Shanghai during 2003-04. A total of 1,044 older respondents were included in the sample. Results: There was a significant urban and rural difference in dental visit rates over the 12-month period of the study. Results from the logistic regression analysis suggested that residing in urban areas was a significant positive factor related to dental visits. In addition, being younger, being able to pay out-of-pocket medical expenses, having had regular medical checkups, having a higher number of limitations because of chronic conditions, and being more concerned about eating a healthy diet were associated with increased odds of dental visits. Conclusions: Results suggest that urban,rural differences, as reflected in the socioeconomic status gap, disparity in medical insurance coverage, and access to dental care, have a significant impact on the use of dental services by Chinese elders. Individual sociodemographic characteristics, health status, and health attitude are important explanatory variables. [source]


    Dental Insurance and Clinical Dental Outcomes in NHANES III

    JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 4 2005
    Tonya R. Stancil PhD
    Abstract Objectives: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) 1988,1994 is one of the few nationally representative data sets with information on both private dental insurance and a clinical dental exam. The objective of this analysis was to examine the possible associations between private dental insurance and clinical exam outcomes, demographic variables, and dental visits. Methods: Using NHANES III data, analysis was limited to persons aged 20 years or older who had a dental exam and reported on their private dental insurance status. Initial analyses were based on comparisons between those with and without private dental insurance. Propensity scoring method was used to examine the effects of dental insurance on clinical exam variables. Results: The percentage of individuals with private dental insurance was significantly greater among non-Hispanic blacks, those with higher educational attainment, those living at/above the federal poverty level, and those with a dental visit in the past year compared to their respective counterparts. Those with untreated caries, those with a loss of attachment of greater than 4 mm, and those with 12,27 missing teeth were significantly less likely to have dental insurance (p<0.05) than their respective counterparts. Conclusions: These results suggest that having private dental insurance is associated with better clinical oral health status. [source]


    Changing Dentate Status of Adults, Use of Dental Health Services, and Achievement of National Dental Health Goals in Denmark by the Year 2000

    JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 3 2004
    DrOdontSci, MSc (Sociology);, Poul Erik Petersen DDS
    ABSTRACT Objectives: This study analyzes the current profile of dentate status and use of dental health services among adults in Denmark at the turn of the millennium, assesses the impact on dentate status of sociodemographic factors and use of dental health services in adulthood and in childhood, and highlights the changes over time in dental health conditions among adults. Finally, the intention of the study was to evaluate the Danish dental health care system's level of achievement of the official goals for the year 2000 as formulated by the World Health Organization and the National Board of Health. The subjects of this study included a national representative sample of 16,690 Danish citizens aged 16 years and older (response rate=74.2%). A subsample (n=3,818) took part in a survey of dental care habits in childhood and prevalence of removable dentures; 66 percent of persons selected responded. Methods: Personal interviews were used to collect information on dentate status, use of dental health services and living conditions; data on dental care habits in childhood and prevalence of removable dentures were collected by self-administered questionnaires. Results: In all, 8 percent of interviewed persons were edentulous, while 80 percent had 20 or more natural teeth. At age 65,74 years, 27 percent were edentulous and 40 percent had 20 teeth or more; 58 percent wore removable dentures. Dentate status and prevalence of dentures were highly related to educational background and income, particularly for older age groups. Among persons interviewed, 80 percent paid regular dental visits and visits were most frequent among persons of high education and income. At age 35,44 years 95 percent had participated in regular dental care in childhood compared to 49 percent of 65,74-year-olds. Multivariate analyses revealed that sociobehavioral factors had significant effects on dentate status. Conclusions: Compared to similar studies carried out in 1987 and 1994, the present survey indicates a positive trend of improved dentate status in adult Danes in general and regular use of dental health services increased considerably over time. The WHO goals for better dental health by the year 2000 were achieved for 35,44-year-olds, whereas the goal of more people with functional dentitions at age 65 years or older was not achieved. It remains a challenge to the Danish dental health system to help even out the social inequalities in dental health. [source]


    An Exploratory Qualitative Study Examining the Social and Psychological Processes Involved in Regular Dental Attendance

    JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 1 2000
    Barry J. Gibson BSc, MMedSc
    Abstract Objective: This study aimed to provide a description of the psychosocial process involved in regular dental attendance. Methods: The study design was a qualitative cross-sectional study using unstructured and semistructured interviews and observations of regular dental visits. The study participants included 12 men and 18 women attending general dental practices and six men and four women attending an emergency dental service. The data were systematically recorded and subjected to line-by-line grounded theory coding around the main concerns of those attending the dentist. Results: The main concern of those attending for a regular dental visit was checking their oral health. The six-month recall was conceptualized as a checking cycle in six phases: recalling, responding, inducing (i), waiting, inducing (ii), and telling. The possible outcomes of the cycle were maintaining oral health, sustaining oral health, and a further checking cycle. Variations in checking cycles resulted from reordering and normalizing pressures within participants' lifestyles. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that people's patterns of dental attendance are similar to those of other chronic illnesses. An understanding of the dynamic psychosocial processes involved in frequent dental attendance may be achieved when further research into this phenomenon is conducted. [source]


    Factors affecting oral health habits among children with cerebral palsy: Pilot study

    PEDIATRICS INTERNATIONAL, Issue 6 2007
    FERYAL SUBASI
    Abstract Background: The aim of the present study was to investigate the factors affecting the oral health habits of children with spastic-type cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: A total of 35 children with CP and their mothers were randomly selected for this cross-sectional study. Data regarding their sociodemographic characteristics and their oral health habits were collected during face-to-face interviews. Results: Logistic regression analysis indicated that mothers' irregular brushing habits were a risk factor for their children's lack of regular brushing habits (odds ratio: 6.4, P = 0.048). Additionally, a significant association was observed between the mother's length of time between dental visits and the length of time between children's dental visits (R2= 0.11, P = 0.046). Conclusions: Mothers' oral health habits, including brushing habits and frequency of dental visits, are important factors in promoting healthy and beneficial oral health habits in children with CP in Turkey. [source]


    Access to dental care among adults with physical and intellectual disabilities: residence factors

    AUSTRALIAN DENTAL JOURNAL, Issue 3 2009
    A Pradhan
    Abstract Background:, There is limited information about access and barriers to dental care among adults with disabilities. Methods:, A mailed questionnaire survey of carers of 18,44-year-old South Australians with physical and intellectual disabilities (care recipients; n = 485) in family homes, community housing and institutions. Bivariate associations were tested using chi-square tests. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 per cent confidence intervals (CI) were estimated for irregular dental visits (IDV). Results:, Carers from family homes and community housing were more likely to report problems in obtaining dental care than those at institutions (p < 0.001). Lack of dentists with adequate skills in special needs dentistry (SND) was the most frequently reported problem for carers from family homes and community housing. IDV were less likely (p < 0.01) for care recipients in institutions and community housing than in family homes. After adjusting for care recipients' age, gender and disability, odds of IDV was lower in community housing (OR = 0.2, 95% CI = 0.1, 0.3) and in institutions (OR = 0.1, 95% CI = 0.04, 0.3) relative to family homes. Conclusions:, Care recipients in institutions and community housing had better access to dental care than those at family homes. The shortage of dentists in SND and treatment costs needs to be addressed. [source]


    Public dental service utilization among adults in South Australia

    AUSTRALIAN DENTAL JOURNAL, Issue 2 2009
    L Luzzi
    Abstract Background:, Longitudinal patterns of public dental service use may reflect access issues to public dental care services. Therefore, patterns of dental service use among South Australian adult public dental patients over a 3˝-year period were examined. Methods:, Public dental patients (n = 898) initially receiving a course of emergency dental care (EDC) or general dental care (GDC) at baseline were followed for up to 3˝ years. Patient clinical records were accessed electronically to obtain information on dental visits and treatment received at those visits. Results:, Some 70.7 per cent of EDC and 51.3 per cent of GDC patients returned for dental treatment post-baseline. EDC patients returned within a significantly shorter time period post-baseline, received significantly more courses of care and were visiting more frequently than GDC patients. A greater proportion of EDC patients received oral surgery, restorative, endodontic and prosthodontic services, but fewer received periodontic services. EDC patients received significantly more oral surgery and fewer preventive services per follow-up year, on average, than GDC patients. Large proportions of EDC (52.4 per cent) and GDC (63.8 per cent) patients who returned sought emergency care post-baseline. Conclusions:, Patients appeared to be cycling through emergency dental care because of lack of access to general care services, highlighting access problems to public dental care. [source]