Comparative Sociology (comparative + sociology)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Comparative Sociology of Law: Legal Fields, Legal Scholarships, and Social Sciences in Europe and the United States

LAW & SOCIAL INQUIRY, Issue 2 2006
Mauricio García-Villegas
This article attempts to gain a better understanding of the sociology(ies) of law in a comparative perspective through a structural and comparative explanation of the American and the French legal fields. It is argued that comparative sociology of law will not be able to explain the difference among countries, scholars, movements, and schools of thought in short, it will not be able to compare,as long as it avoids the analysis of some social and cultural presuppositions related to the context in which these differences take place. It focuses mainly on two of these presuppositions. First, legal fields, with their history, their internal structure, and their power relations, and second the type of relation between the legal field and the state. The empirical examination provided in this article explicitly seeks to offer insights for the reconstruction of Bourdieu's structural theory of the legal field. [source]


REJOINDER TO FRACCHIA AND LEWONTIN

HISTORY AND THEORY, Issue 1 2005
W. G. RUNCIMAN
ABSTRACT In their response to my article, Fracchia and Lewontin have not refuted any of my three principal objections to theirs; they have ignored altogether my suggestion that evolutionary game theory illustrates particularly clearly the benefits that neo-Darwinian concepts and methods can bring to the human behavioral sciences; and they have attributed to me a version of "methodological individualism" to which I do not subscribe. It is, as is usual at this stage of a Kuhnian paradigm shift, too soon to say how much selectionist theory can contribute to the human behavioral sciences in general and comparative sociology in particular. But selectionism's critics achieve nothing by alleging that its proponents are committed to propositions to which they do not in fact assent and deny propositions with which they in fact agree. [source]


Comparative Sociology of Law: Legal Fields, Legal Scholarships, and Social Sciences in Europe and the United States

LAW & SOCIAL INQUIRY, Issue 2 2006
Mauricio García-Villegas
This article attempts to gain a better understanding of the sociology(ies) of law in a comparative perspective through a structural and comparative explanation of the American and the French legal fields. It is argued that comparative sociology of law will not be able to explain the difference among countries, scholars, movements, and schools of thought in short, it will not be able to compare,as long as it avoids the analysis of some social and cultural presuppositions related to the context in which these differences take place. It focuses mainly on two of these presuppositions. First, legal fields, with their history, their internal structure, and their power relations, and second the type of relation between the legal field and the state. The empirical examination provided in this article explicitly seeks to offer insights for the reconstruction of Bourdieu's structural theory of the legal field. [source]


Urban outcasts: a comparative sociology of advanced marginality , By Loïc Wacquant

AREA, Issue 2 2010
Stuart Hodkinson
No abstract is available for this article. [source]