Clinical Psychology Training (clinical + psychology_training)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Trainee clinical psychologists' adaptation and professional functioning: a longitudinal study

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHOTHERAPY (AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF THEORY & PRACTICE), Issue 1 2003
Willem Kuyken
Clinical psychology training is a professionally formative period, which provides an opportunity to enable trainees to learn good self-care skills and mature approaches to learning. If realized, this can support lifelong learning and high levels of professional functioning. This study sought to use transactional coping theory and experiential learning theory to improve our understanding of what factors predict changes in psychological adaptation and professional functioning over the course of clinical psychology training. A mixed prospective within-persons and cross-sectional between-persons design was used. A sample of 183 trainee clinical psychologists (60.2% response rate) from 15 British clinical psychology training programmes participated at time one, 167 of whom participated at time 2 a year later (91.3% of the time 1 sample). They completed measures of appraisal, coping, social support and professional functioning at times 1 and 2. Path analyses suggested that trainees who appraised the demands of training as manageable, and reported greater access to appropriate support, engaged in less avoidance coping, reported fewer problems of psychological adaptation and were more likely to approach the task of learning and working appropriately and resiliently. Implications for clinical psychology training are suggested. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Psychotherapy in Australia: Clinical psychology and its approach to depression

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 8 2007
David J. Kavanagh
In Australia, clinical psychology training is dominated by cognitive and behavioral treatments (CBTs), although there is exposure to other theoretical orientations. Since 2001, over 20% of general medical practitioners (GPs) have received training in CBT, and psychiatry training increasingly incorporates CBT elements. Psychotherapy by medical practitioners is financially supported by universal health care funding with supplementation by patients and their private health insurance. Federally funded health benefits for up to 12 psychology consultations per year are provided on referral from GPs and psychiatrists, and initial takeup has been very strong. Mrs. A would be a typical patient for such a referral. However, she would not fulfill criteria for priority access from state-funded mental health services. Mrs. A would probably consult a GP and receive antidepressants, although she may also access a range of other community support programs. Access to and acceptance of psychotherapy would be greater in urban areas, and if she were of Anglo-Saxon and nonindigenous origin. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol: In Session 63: 725,733, 2007. [source]


Trainee clinical psychologists' adaptation and professional functioning: a longitudinal study

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHOTHERAPY (AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF THEORY & PRACTICE), Issue 1 2003
Willem Kuyken
Clinical psychology training is a professionally formative period, which provides an opportunity to enable trainees to learn good self-care skills and mature approaches to learning. If realized, this can support lifelong learning and high levels of professional functioning. This study sought to use transactional coping theory and experiential learning theory to improve our understanding of what factors predict changes in psychological adaptation and professional functioning over the course of clinical psychology training. A mixed prospective within-persons and cross-sectional between-persons design was used. A sample of 183 trainee clinical psychologists (60.2% response rate) from 15 British clinical psychology training programmes participated at time one, 167 of whom participated at time 2 a year later (91.3% of the time 1 sample). They completed measures of appraisal, coping, social support and professional functioning at times 1 and 2. Path analyses suggested that trainees who appraised the demands of training as manageable, and reported greater access to appropriate support, engaged in less avoidance coping, reported fewer problems of psychological adaptation and were more likely to approach the task of learning and working appropriately and resiliently. Implications for clinical psychology training are suggested. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Personality style, psychological adaptation and expectations of trainee clinical psychologists

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHOTHERAPY (AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF THEORY & PRACTICE), Issue 4 2002
Jeni Brooks
The literature suggests that personality affects how individuals experience stress, cope, utilize social support and psychologically adapt. This study examined the personality style, psychological adaptation and expectations of 364 UK trainee clinical psychologists. Personality traits characterizing the sample were: enhancing, modifying, extraversing, outgoing, and agreeing. Mean overall personality adjustment was significantly better than the normal population. The sample scored significantly poorer on self-esteem, anxiety and depression, but well outside the defined range for poor adaptation. A small percentage (8%, n = 31) had ,poor' personality adjustment scores, scored worse on indicators of psychological adaptation and reported greater shortfall of course aspects compared with expectations. However, 41% scored as having a significant problem on one or more of: anxiety, depression, low self-esteem and work adjustment. About one-third had a probable substance use problem. In regression analyses, poor personality adjustment, and different areas of expectation-shortfall, especially impact of training on life variously predicted anxiety, depression, and poor work adjustment. Satisfaction with social support was not predictive of adaptation after personality adjustment was accounted for. Implications for clinical psychology training include the need for enhanced expectation-management through pre-course marketing, and better attention to trainees' personal and professional development throughout training. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]