Business History (business + history)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


HIDDEN DISCIPLINES IN MALAYSIA: THE ROLE OF BUSINESS HISTORY IN A MULTI-DISCIPLINARY FRAMEWORK

AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 3 2009
Article first published online: 28 OCT 200, Shakila Yacob
business history; business economics; economic history; Malaysian history; multi-disciplinary studies Business history plays a crucial role in the understanding of the history and socioeconomic development of Malaysia. This paper analyses that role through an assessment of the most relevant colonial, post-colonial, and contemporary literature. Malaysian business history adopts a multidisciplinary approach, which has the potential to propel the discipline to address potentially sensitive political issues in Malaysia, though in the past business history's assimilation into other disciplines has discouraged, with notable exceptions, its potential to explore sensitive topics. In conclusion, the paper outlines the challenges faced by Malaysian business history academics and argues for extending the discipline's boundaries. [source]


Asia-Pacific Economic and Business History (APEBH) Conference 2010 Bruce McComish Fund , Doctoral Student Sponsorship Sir Timothy Coghlan Prize Winner, Best Paper Published in AEHR 2008 Blackwell Publishing Conference Paper Prize, Asia-Pacific Economic and Business History Conference 2009 S. J. Butlin Prize McCarty Prize

AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 2 2009
Article first published online: 22 JUN 200
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Business Ethics and Business History: Neglected Dimensions in Management Education

BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2002
R. Warren
This article highlights two large gaps in the business school curriculum: the neglect of historical and ethical dimensions. An overview is provided of progress made so far in the UK in the evolution of business history as an academic discipline; and also of the take,up of business ethics in university teaching. Both have had some success, but overall the response to these areas has been somewhat lacklustre , at least in the UK. A justification is provided for adding both components to a fully relevant business education. When the two are combined, the result can be a highly rewarding combination that provides insights that may not be possible for management writers, who work only in the present. Corporate ethics, the social responsibility of companies, disclosure, the environment, the actions of multinational companies overseas, the dilemmas of whistle,blowing, the impact of lobby groups and health and safety issues can all be understood more fully by students if they approach these subjects from an ethical and historical standpoint. [source]


HIDDEN DISCIPLINES IN MALAYSIA: THE ROLE OF BUSINESS HISTORY IN A MULTI-DISCIPLINARY FRAMEWORK

AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 3 2009
Article first published online: 28 OCT 200, Shakila Yacob
business history; business economics; economic history; Malaysian history; multi-disciplinary studies Business history plays a crucial role in the understanding of the history and socioeconomic development of Malaysia. This paper analyses that role through an assessment of the most relevant colonial, post-colonial, and contemporary literature. Malaysian business history adopts a multidisciplinary approach, which has the potential to propel the discipline to address potentially sensitive political issues in Malaysia, though in the past business history's assimilation into other disciplines has discouraged, with notable exceptions, its potential to explore sensitive topics. In conclusion, the paper outlines the challenges faced by Malaysian business history academics and argues for extending the discipline's boundaries. [source]


The Oxford handbook of business history , Edited by Geoffrey Jones and Jonathan Zeitlin

ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 2 2009
JOHN F WILSON
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Theorizing TQM: An Austrian and Evolutionary Economics Interpretation

JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, Issue 2 2000
Todd H. Chiles
Born out of management practice, the principles of TQM (total quality management) have had a profound and unparalleled impact on modern business history. However, as a body of practical knowledge, TQM has been largely atheoretical. As a consequence, this important management philosophy has remained amorphous and shrouded in considerable conceptual haziness and ambiguity. Recent theorizing, primarily emphasizing the application of organizational behaviour theories to TQM, has begun to provide greater clarity, but much work remains to be done. This paper attempts to contribute to this nascent theory-building literature by employing theory from market process economics (MPE), namely, Austrian and evolutionary economics, which explains how processes of dynamic change, adaptation, and learning are driven by entrepreneurial creativity. We contend that the patterns in this body of theory match, to a remarkable degree, the patterns of practical knowledge contained in the TQM literature. We demonstrate this ,pattern-matching' by showing that MPE effectively provides the theoretical underpinnings of TQM's three main principles , customer focus, continuous improvement and teamwork , as well as the respective TQM topics of customer perceptions, adaptation in dynamic environments, and knowledge creation. Having established MPE as a credible theoretical lens for interpreting TQM, it can be used to clarify fuzzy areas that have remained in the TQM literature with the potential to take us beyond what we know now. We illustrate this with three examples that show how we can resolve debates in TQM over incentive systems, recognize that TQM embraces methodological pluralism in the collection and analysis of data, and highlight hidden dangers that attend benchmarking. While MPE has no monopoly on theoretical interpretations of TQM, it is unique in its ability to comprehensively cover the incredible breadth of this practical body of knowledge, and in its interpretation of TQM as a dynamic economic endeavour. [source]


HIDDEN DISCIPLINES IN MALAYSIA: THE ROLE OF BUSINESS HISTORY IN A MULTI-DISCIPLINARY FRAMEWORK

AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 3 2009
Article first published online: 28 OCT 200, Shakila Yacob
business history; business economics; economic history; Malaysian history; multi-disciplinary studies Business history plays a crucial role in the understanding of the history and socioeconomic development of Malaysia. This paper analyses that role through an assessment of the most relevant colonial, post-colonial, and contemporary literature. Malaysian business history adopts a multidisciplinary approach, which has the potential to propel the discipline to address potentially sensitive political issues in Malaysia, though in the past business history's assimilation into other disciplines has discouraged, with notable exceptions, its potential to explore sensitive topics. In conclusion, the paper outlines the challenges faced by Malaysian business history academics and argues for extending the discipline's boundaries. [source]


The future of management: does business history have anything to tell us?

AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 1 2003
Paul. L. Robertson
Although many of the environmental factors described by Alfred D. Chandler, Jr are altering under the impact of technological change, this will not necessarily lead to wholesale changes in the roles played by managers. Many of the functions of managers will remain intact, even if new technologies alter how they are executed. Moreover, the managerial and organizational capabilities developed to control ,Chandlerian' firms are adaptable and will continue to be exercised despite transformations in the contexts that initially inspired them. [source]


Business Ethics and Business History: Neglected Dimensions in Management Education

BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2002
R. Warren
This article highlights two large gaps in the business school curriculum: the neglect of historical and ethical dimensions. An overview is provided of progress made so far in the UK in the evolution of business history as an academic discipline; and also of the take,up of business ethics in university teaching. Both have had some success, but overall the response to these areas has been somewhat lacklustre , at least in the UK. A justification is provided for adding both components to a fully relevant business education. When the two are combined, the result can be a highly rewarding combination that provides insights that may not be possible for management writers, who work only in the present. Corporate ethics, the social responsibility of companies, disclosure, the environment, the actions of multinational companies overseas, the dilemmas of whistle,blowing, the impact of lobby groups and health and safety issues can all be understood more fully by students if they approach these subjects from an ethical and historical standpoint. [source]