Brownian Motor (brownian + motor)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


A three-dimensional Brownian motor, realised with symmetric optical lattices

PHYSICA STATUS SOLIDI (B) BASIC SOLID STATE PHYSICS, Issue 5 2009
Anders Kastberg
Abstract A three-dimensional Brownian motor is realised using lasercooled caesium atoms trapped in a system of two static, and individually symmetric, optical lattices; a so-called double optical lattice. Isotropic fluctuations, emanating from light scattering, are rectified, and the diffusion of the ensemble of atoms is biased, with a resulting constant velocity that is controllable both in direction and magnitude. The working principle of the Brownian motor can be seen as a pulsation between two different potentials, both symmetric but around different points. The correlation between interferometric spatial offsets, and imbalance in optical pumping rates, leads to a spatio-temporal asymmetry sufficient for generating a controlled, directed motion ( 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim) [source]


Feedback control in flashing ratchets,

ANNALEN DER PHYSIK, Issue 2-3 2008
E.M. Craig
Abstract A flashing ratchet uses a time-dependent, spatially periodic, asymmetric potential to rectify thermal motion of Brownian particles. Here we review approaches to improve the particle flux in this type of Brownian motor by feedback strategies that switch the potential based on the instantaneous particle distribution. We review strategies that are based on the force experienced by the particles, and introduce a new feedback strategy that is based on the expected displacement that can be achieved. Langevin dynamics simulations show that this maximum net displacement strategy performs better than force-based strategies in the limit of very small particle numbers and not too high temperatures. We also review the effects of time delay and noisy channels on feedback control, and perform a feasibility analysis of an experimental system that can realize feedback control using a computer-controlled, scanning-line optical trap and suspended microspheres. [source]