Broselow Tape (broselow + tape)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Internationalizing the Broselow Tape: How Reliable Is Weight Estimation in Indian Children

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 5 2008
Naresh Ramarajan AB
Abstract Objectives:, The Broselow pediatric emergency weight estimation tape is an accurate method of estimating children's weights based on height,weight correlations and determining standardized medication dosages and equipment sizes using color-coded zones. The study objective was to determine the accuracy of the Broselow tape in the Indian pediatric population. Methods:, The authors conducted a 6-week prospective cross-sectional study of 548 children at a government pediatric hospital in Chennai, India, in three weight-based groups: <10 kg (n = 175), 10,18 kg (n = 197), and >18 kg (n = 176). Measured weight was compared to Broselow-predicted weight, and the percentage difference was calculated. Accuracy was defined as agreement on Broselow color-coded zones, as well as agreement within 10% between the measured and Broselow-predicted weights. A cross-validated correction factor was also derived. Results:, The mean percentage differences were ,2.4, ,11.3, and ,12.9% for each weight-based group. The Broselow color-coded zone agreement was 70.8% in children weighing less than 10 kg, but only 56.3% in the 10- to 18-kg group and 37.5% in the >18-kg group. Agreement within 10% was 52.6% for the <10-kg group, but only 44.7% for the 10- to 18-kg group and 33.5% for the >18-kg group. Application of a 10% weight-correction factor improved the percentages to 77.1% for the 10- to 18-kg group and 63.0% for the >18-kg group. Conclusions:, The Broselow tape overestimates weight by more than 10% in Indian children >10 kg. Weight overestimation increases the risk of medical errors due to incorrect dosing or equipment selection. Applying a 10% weight-correction factor may be advisable. [source]


Can the Broselow Tape Be Used to Estimate Weight and Endotracheal Tube Size in Korean Children?

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 5 2007
Hye Young Jang MD
BackgroundThe Broselow pediatric emergency tape (BT) was developed to provide a length-based estimate of body weight and equipment size during resuscitation. ObjectivesTo conduct a validation study on the use of the BT in Korean children. MethodsAnesthesia records from children were retrospectively reviewed. The measured weights of the subjects were compared with the BT weight estimates by using Bland-Altman analysis. The accuracy of the BT and age-based formula in predicting the endotracheal tube (ETT) size were also compared. The authors drew a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve to evaluate the cutoff height that would be acceptable for the application of BT without error in Korean children. ResultsA total of 665 children (mean [ SD] age, 5.1 [ 3.3] years, 61.8% male) were enrolled. The average measured weight of the Korean children was 1.54 kg heavier than the BT estimates (95% CI = 1.24 to 1.85 kg). The BT estimates showed better agreement with the actually used ETT sizes than did the age-based formula estimates (86.9% vs. 34.9%, p < 0.001). The cutoff height of the ROC curve was 127.15 cm. When the BT was used in children who were shorter than the cutoff height, 98.8% of the enrolled children's estimated weights were within the limits of agreement. ConclusionsThe BT can be used in Korean children as a helpful adjunct during resuscitation to estimate the weight and ETT size. [source]


The Use of the Broselow Tape in Pediatric Resuscitation

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 5 2007
Robert C. Luten MD
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Use of the Broselow Tape May Result in the Underresuscitation of Children

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 10 2006
ACNP, Carolyn T. Nieman MSN
Abstract Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the concordance of the Broselow tape with the measured heights and weights of a community-based population of children, especially in light of the increase in obesity in today's children. Methods The authors examined more than 7,500 children in a cross-sectional, descriptive study in two different cohorts of children to compare their actual weight with their predicted weight by a color-coded tape measure. Results In all patients, the percent agreement and , values of the Broselow color predicted by height versus the actual color by weight for the 2002A tape were 66.2% and 0.61, respectively. The concordance was best in infants, followed by school-age children, toddlers, and preschoolers (,= 0.66, 0.44, 0.39, and 0.39, respectively; percent agreement, 81.3%, 58.2%, 60.7%, and 64.0%, respectively). The tapes accurately predicted (within 10%) medication dosages for resuscitation in 55.3%,60.0% of the children. The number of children who were underdosed (by ,10%) exceeded those who were overdosed (by ,10%) by 2.5 to 4.4 times (p < 0.05). The tapes accurately predicted uncuffed endotracheal tube sizes when compared with age-based guidelines in 71% of the children, with undersizing (,0.5 mm) exceeding oversizing by threefold to fourfold (p < 0.05). Conclusions The Broselow tape color-coded system inaccurately predicted actual weight in one third of children. Caregivers need to take into consideration the accuracy of this device when estimating children's weight during the resuscitation of a child. [source]


Emergency weight estimation in Pacific Island and Maori children who are large-for-age

EMERGENCY MEDICINE AUSTRALASIA, Issue 3 2005
Lynn Theron
Abstract Objective:, Methods to estimate weights of children requiring resuscitation appeared to underestimate the weight of Pacific Island and Maori children. This study sought to quantify differences between real and estimated weights, study links with ethnicity and derive a new estimation method for large-for-age children. Method:, Data were collected prospectively for 3 months. Weights were estimated by formulae described by Shann, Leffler, the Advanced Paediatric Life Support (APLS) formula, the Oakley resuscitation chart and the Broselow tape. Results:, Of the 909 children included, 46% were of Pacific Island and 25% were of Maori origin. Differences between actual and estimated weights were significantly greater (P < 0.05) for the Pacific Island group using all methods of estimation. Maori differences were significantly greater than European differences using Oakley and Broselow methods (P < 0.05). The Broselow tape was the method most likely to underestimate weight in Pacific Island and Maori children. A new formula was derived from non-linear regression analysis, leading to a new chart. Conclusion:, Current emergency methods underestimate weight in Pacific Island and Maori children. We recommend a new chart for these children. [source]


Internationalizing the Broselow Tape: How Reliable Is Weight Estimation in Indian Children

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 5 2008
Naresh Ramarajan AB
Abstract Objectives:, The Broselow pediatric emergency weight estimation tape is an accurate method of estimating children's weights based on height,weight correlations and determining standardized medication dosages and equipment sizes using color-coded zones. The study objective was to determine the accuracy of the Broselow tape in the Indian pediatric population. Methods:, The authors conducted a 6-week prospective cross-sectional study of 548 children at a government pediatric hospital in Chennai, India, in three weight-based groups: <10 kg (n = 175), 10,18 kg (n = 197), and >18 kg (n = 176). Measured weight was compared to Broselow-predicted weight, and the percentage difference was calculated. Accuracy was defined as agreement on Broselow color-coded zones, as well as agreement within 10% between the measured and Broselow-predicted weights. A cross-validated correction factor was also derived. Results:, The mean percentage differences were ,2.4, ,11.3, and ,12.9% for each weight-based group. The Broselow color-coded zone agreement was 70.8% in children weighing less than 10 kg, but only 56.3% in the 10- to 18-kg group and 37.5% in the >18-kg group. Agreement within 10% was 52.6% for the <10-kg group, but only 44.7% for the 10- to 18-kg group and 33.5% for the >18-kg group. Application of a 10% weight-correction factor improved the percentages to 77.1% for the 10- to 18-kg group and 63.0% for the >18-kg group. Conclusions:, The Broselow tape overestimates weight by more than 10% in Indian children >10 kg. Weight overestimation increases the risk of medical errors due to incorrect dosing or equipment selection. Applying a 10% weight-correction factor may be advisable. [source]