Broken-line Regression Analysis (broken-line + regression_analysis)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Dietary vitamin A requirement of juvenile Amur sturgeon (Acipenser schrenckii)

JOURNAL OF APPLIED ICHTHYOLOGY, Issue 5 2008
H. Wen
Summary The present experiment was conducted to determine the dietary vitamin A requirement of juvenile Amur sturgeon (Acipenser schrenckii) by formulating seven semipurified diets containing 10, 258, 510, 1050, 2020, 4100 and 8300 IU vitamin A (as retinol acetate) kg,1 diet, respectively. Each experimental diet was fed to triplicate groups of 20 juveniles each with initial average weights of 12.09 0.22 g in 405-L aquaria and maintained at 25.0 2.0C for 8 weeks. Fish fed the basal diet (10 IU vitamin A kg,1 diet) exhibited poor appetite and activity, whereas these signs were not observed in any group fed vitamin A-supplemented diets. Weight gain, feed efficiency and hepatosomatic index increased significantly with increases in the dietary vitamin A level, reaching a peak with the vitamin A 1050 IU kg,1 diet, and then decreasing. Muscle chemical compositions were not affected by the dietary vitamin A levels. Vitamin A concentrations in liver and muscle increased significantly as the vitamin A levels increased within a range of 10,4100 IU kg,1 diet; above this level there were no significant changes. Broken-line regression analysis of weight gain and liver vitamin A concentration against the dietary vitamin A level showed that juvenile Amur sturgeon required a minimum of 923 IU vitamin A kg,1 in the diet for maximal growth, and 1981 IU kg,1 for highest liver vitamin A accumulation. [source]


Estimation of dietary biotin requirement of Japanese seabass, Lateolabrax japonicus C.

AQUACULTURE NUTRITION, Issue 3 2010
J. LI
Abstract A 9-week feeding experiment was conducted to determine the dietary biotin requirement of Japanese seabass, Lateolabrax japonicus C. Six isonitrogenous and isoenergetic purified diets (Diets 1,6) containing 0, 0.01, 0.049, 0.247, 1.238 and 6.222 mg biotin kg,1 diet were fed twice daily to triplicate groups (30 fish per group) of fish (initial average weight 2.26 0.03 g) in 18 fibreglass tanks (300 L) filled with 250 L of water in a flow-through system. Water flow rate through each tank was 2 L min,1. Water temperature ranged from 25.0 to 28.0 C, salinity from 28.0 to 29.5 g L,1, pH from 8.0 to 8.1 and dissolved oxygen content was approximately 7 mg L,1 during the experiment. After the feeding experiment, fish fed Diet 1 developed severe biotin deficiency syndromes characterized by anorexia, poor growth, dark skin colour, atrophy and high mortality. Significant lower survival (73.3%) was observed in the treatment of deficient biotin. The final weight and weight gain of fish significantly increased with increasing dietary biotin up to 0.049 mg kg,1 diet (P < 0.05), and then slightly decreased. Both feed efficiency ratio and protein efficiency ratio showed a very similar change pattern to that of weight gain. Dietary treatments did not significantly affect carcass crude protein, crude lipid, moisture and ash content. However, liver biotin concentration (0,6.1 ,g g,1) significantly increased with the supplementation of dietary biotin (P < 0.05), and no tissue saturation was found within the supplementation scope of biotin. Broken-line regression analysis of weight gain showed that juvenile Japanese seabass require a minimum of 0.046 mg kg,1 biotin for maximal growth. [source]


Re-evaluation of total sulphur amino acid requirement and determination of replacement value of cystine for methionine in semi-purified diets of juvenile Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

AQUACULTURE NUTRITION, Issue 3 2009
T.N. NGUYEN
Abstract Two feeding experiments were conducted to re-evaluate the total sulphur amino acid (TSAA; methionine and cystine) requirement and determine the replacement value of cystine for methionine of juvenile Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Semi-purified diets used in both experiments contained 3510 kcal gross energy and 280 g of protein per kilogram diet from casein, gelatin and crystalline amino acids. The basal diet of the first experiment contained 3.1 g methionine and 0.4 g cystine per kilogram. l -methionine was added to the seven remaining diets at 1.0 g kg,1 increment to produce methionine levels ranging from 3.1 to 10.1 g kg,1 diet. Each diet was fed to four replicate groups of juvenile Nile tilapia (1.28 g mean weight) in a recirculation system for 8 weeks. Broken-line regression analysis of weight gain data indicated that the TSAA requirement of juvenile Nile tilapia was 8.5 g kg,1 of the diet or 30.4 g kg,1 of dietary protein. In the second experiment, TSAA level was set at 95% of the requirement value determined in the first experiment. Seven diets were made with different ratios of l -methionine and l -cystine (20 : 80, 30 : 70, 40 : 60, 50 : 50, 60 : 40, 70 : 30 and 80 : 20, based on an equimolar sulphur basis). Each diet was also fed to four replicate groups of juvenile Nile tilapia (4.14 g mean weight) in a recirculation system for 8 weeks. Regression analysis of weight gain data using broken-line model indicated that cystine (on a molar sulphur basis) could replace up to 49% of methionine requirement in semi-purified diets for juvenile Nile tilapia. [source]


Nutrient values of dietary ascorbic acid (l -ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate) on growth, survival and stress tolerance of larval shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei

AQUACULTURE NUTRITION, Issue 2 2009
J. NIU
Abstract l -ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (ApP) was used as a vitamin C source to investigate the ascorbic acid (AsA) requirements on growth performance and stress resistance of the larval white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. Five isoenergetic and isonitrogenous fish meal-fish protein hydrolysate-based diets with five levels of ApP, AsA equivalent to 91.8, 188, 271, 360 and 436 mg kg,1 diet were fed to triplicate groups of L. vannamei (mean initial wet weight 1 mg) for 32 days. The diet with AsA 91.8 mg kg,1 showed high cumulative mortality after 10 days of feeding. After the 32-day trial, the shrimp that fed the diet had significantly lower survival and weight gain (WG, %) than those that fed 188, 271, 360 and 436 mg AsA kg,1 diets. Specific growth rate (SGR, % day,1) and final body wet weight (FBW, mg) showed the same pattern as WG (%). There were no significant differences in growth performance (FBW, WG and SGR) among the groups that fed 188, 271, 360 and 436 mg kg,1 of AsA at the termination of feeding trial. Broken-line regression analysis on WG indicated that 191 mg AsA kg,1 in the diet was the optimum for larval L. vannamei. On the contrary, dietary level of more than 360 mg AsA kg,1 was needed to ensure high resistance to stressful conditions such as low dissolved oxygen stressors. [source]


Quantitative dietary threonine requirement of juvenile Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone) reared in low-salinity water

AQUACULTURE RESEARCH, Issue 8 2009
Ming-Yan Huai
Abstract An 8-week feeding trial was conducted to determine the threonine requirement of juvenile Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone) in low-salinity water (0.50,1.50 g L,1). Diets 1,6 were formulated to contain 360 g kg,1 crude protein with fish meal, wheat gluten and pre-coated crystalline amino acids with six graded levels of l -threonine (9.9,19.0 g kg,1 dry diet). Diet 7, which was served as a reference, contained only intact proteins (fish meal and wheat gluten). Each diet was randomly assigned to triplicate groups of 30 shrimps (0.480.01 g), each four times daily. Shrimps fed the reference diet had similar growth performance and feed utilization efficiency compared with shrimps fed the diets containing 13.3 g kg,1 or higher threonine. Maximum specific growth rate (SGR) and protein efficiency ratio were obtained at 14.6 g kg,1 dietary threonine, and increasing threonine beyond this level did not result in a better performance. Body compositions, triacyglycerol and total protein concentrations in haemolymph were significantly affected by the threonine level; however, the threonine contents in muscle, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities in haemolymph were not influenced by the dietary threonine levels. Broken-line regression analysis on SGR indicated that optimal dietary threonine requirement for L. vannamei was 13.6 g kg,1 dry diet (37.8 g kg,1 dietary protein). [source]


Vitamin C requirement of kuruma shrimp postlarvae, Marsupenaeus japonicus (Bate), using l -ascorbyl-2-monophosphate-Na/Ca

AQUACULTURE RESEARCH, Issue 8 2005
Yin Yin Moe
Abstract l -ascorbyl-2-monophosphate-Na/Ca (AMP-Na/Ca) was used as a vitamin C source to investigate the ascorbic acid (AsA) requirements on growth performance and stress resistance of the post-larval kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus. Purified carrageenan-microbound diets with six levels of AMP-Na/Ca, AsA equivalent to 0, 20, 56, 87, 759 and 1697 mg kg,1 diet were fed to triplicate groups of M. japonicus (mean initial weight 160.3 mg) for 30 days. The diets with AsA 0, 20 and 56 mg kg,1 showed high cumulative mortality after 10 days of feeding. After the 30-day trial, the shrimp fed these diets had significantly lower survival and weight gain (WG, %) than those fed the 87, 759 and 1697 mg AsA kg,1 diets. Specific growth rate and individual dry weight showed the same pattern as WG (%). There were no significant differences in growth performance among the groups fed the AsA levels at 87, 759 and 1697 mg kg,1 at the termination of feeding trial. Broken-line regression analysis indicated that 91.8 mg AsA kg,1 in the diet was the optimum for post-larval shrimp. On the other hand, dietary level of more than 800 mg AsA kg,1 was needed to ensure high resistance to stressful conditions such as osmotic and formalin stressors. [source]


Effects of digestible protein levels in isonitrogenous diets on growth performance and tissue composition of juvenile Atractoscion nobilis

AQUACULTURE NUTRITION, Issue 1 2010
E. DURAZO
Abstract A study was undertaken to estimate the effects of isonitrogenous diets (ca. 604 g kg,1 crude protein) containing formaldehyde-treated (FT) fish meal and graded levels of digestible protein (DP) (541, 491, 372, 347 and 247 g kg,1) on growth performance and tissue composition of juveniles white seabass. Five diets were formulated to contain increasing levels of FT fish meal (from 0 to 384 g kg,1) and decreasing levels of non-treated fish meal (from 480 to 96 g kg,1). Each dietary treatment was fed in triplicate to apparent satiation to groups of 25 fish for 50 days. Significantly higher growth performance and feed conversion ratio were obtained in fish-fed diets containing 491 or 541 g kg,1 DP, compared with all other treatments. Apparent digestibility coefficient of protein in the diets was not significantly affected by the inclusion of treated fish meal in the diets. Estimation of protein requirements using a broken-line regression analysis indicated that maximum weight gain would be obtained with a diet containing 503 23 g kg,1 DP. The results from this study suggest that a single-diet formulation using protein treated with formaldehyde as filler might be useful to estimate the requirement of DP for fish. [source]


Dietary vitamin E requirement of the red drum Sciaenops ocellatus

AQUACULTURE NUTRITION, Issue 3 2009
L.I. PENG
Abstract A 12-week feeding trial was conducted to establish the minimum dietary vitamin E requirement of juvenile red drum by broken-line regression analysis. The semi-purified basal diet was supplemented with 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 or 80 IU vitamin E kg,1 as all-rac -,-tocopheryl acetate. Juvenile red drum were conditioned by feeding the basal diet for 8 weeks prior to the feeding trial to reduce whole-body vitamin E levels. Then, fish initially averaging 12.2 0.4 g fish,1 (mean SD) were fed the experimental diets at a rate approaching apparent satiation for 12 weeks. Weight gain and feed efficiency responses of fish fed diets were significantly (P < 0.01) altered by the level of vitamin E supplementation but not strictly in a dose-dependent manner. Vitamin E concentrations in liver and plasma also were significantly (P < 0.001) influenced by dietary vitamin E level. Plasma ascorbic acid in fish fed the basal diet tended (P = 0.066) to be lower than in fish fed diets containing the various levels of vitamin E. In addition, fish fed the basal diet showed edema in the heart, while fish fed all other diets were normal. Fish fed 60 or 80 IU all-rac -,-tocopheryl acetate kg,1 diet had significantly higher respiratory burst of head kidney macrophages than fish fed all other diets, although dietary effects on hematocrit and neutrophil oxidative radical production were not significant. The minimum dietary vitamin E requirement of juvenile red drum was established based on broken-line regression of liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances to be 31 mg all-rac -,-tocopheryl acetate kg,1 diet. [source]


Effects of feeding levels on growth performance, feed utilization, body composition and apparent digestibility coefficients of nutrients for juvenile Chinese sucker, Myxocyprinus asiaticus

AQUACULTURE RESEARCH, Issue 7 2010
Yong-Chao Yuan
Abstract An experiment was conducted to determine effects of feeding levels on growth performance, feed utilization, nutrient deposition, body composition and apparent digestibility coefficients (ADCs) of nutrients for juvenile Chinese sucker (initial weight, 11.770.22 g). Chinese sucker were fed a practical diet from 0% (starvation) to 4.0% (at 0.5% increments) body weight (bw) day,1 for 8 weeks. The results showed that growth performance, feed utilization, nutrient deposition, body composition and ADCs of dry matter, protein and energy were significantly (P<0.05) affected by feeding levels. Survival was the lowest for the starvation group. Final mean body weight, growth rate, thermal-unit growth coefficient (TGC) increased with feeding rate from 0% to 3.0% bw day,1 (P<0.05) and showed no significant differences above the level (P>0.05). Feed conversion rate was significantly lower at a feeding level of 2.5% bw day,1 than above and below the level (P<0.05). Protein efficiency ratio was markedly highest at the 2.5% bw day,1 ration level (P<0.05). Fish fed at the feeding level (1.0% bw day,1), which represented a maintenance ration (energy gain was less than 2.27 kJ fish,1 day,1), showed positive protein deposition but negative lipid deposition. This indicates that fish fed a maintenance ration mobilize body lipid reserve to support protein deposition. Lipid contents of whole body, muscle and liver increased with increasing feeding rates from 0.5% to 3.0% bw day,1 and showed no significant differences above the level (P>0.05). Protein contents of whole-body composition increased with feeding rate from 0.5 to 3.0% bw day,1 (P<0.05) and showed no significant differences above the level (P>0.05), whereas muscle and liver remained relatively stable with the different ration amount with the exception of fish fed a ration of 0.5% bw day,1, at which Chinese sucker possessed significantly lower body protein concentration (P<0.05). The ADCs of dry matter, protein and energy decreased with increasing feeding levels from 0.5% to 3.0% bw day,1 and then remained relatively constant over the level. Based on the broken-line regression analysis using WG data, the optimum and maintenance feeding levels for Chinese sucker were 3.10% bw day,1 and 0.45% bw day,1 respectively. [source]