Breastfeeding Initiation (breastfeeding + initiation)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The Association of Couples' Relationship Status and Quality With Breastfeeding Initiation

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 5 2007
Christina M. Gibson-Davis
Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Survey (N= 3,567), we examine the links between relationship status, relationship quality, and race and ethnicity in breastfeeding initiation. We consider four relationship types: married, cohabiting, romantically involved but not cohabiting (termed visiting), and nonromantically involved mothers. We find that even after adjusting for a wide range of sociodemographic factors, married mothers were more likely to breastfeed than unmarried mothers and that racial and ethnic differences in breastfeeding do not result from differences in marriage rates. Among unwed mothers, paternal provision of money or other assistance during pregnancy decreases the likelihood of breastfeeding. We conclude that relationship status, above and beyond demographic characteristics, is an important correlate of breastfeeding. [source]


Effect of Delivery Method and Timing of Breastfeeding Initiation on Breastfeeding Outcomes in Taiwan

BIRTH, Issue 2 2007
Li-Yin Chien RN
ABSTRACT: Background: Few studies have examined the independent effect of delivery method and timing of breastfeeding initiation on the prevalence of breastfeeding. The objectives of this study were to examine the effect of method of delivery and timing of breastfeeding initiation on the prevalence of breastfeeding at 1 and 3 months after delivery using a national sample from Taiwan. Methods: The study population of 2,064 women who gave birth to infants without congenital anomalies at hospitals in Taiwan from June through October 2003, inclusively, participated in a postal questionnaire survey. Results: Multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis showed that women with cesarean delivery had a lower odds of breastfeeding at 1 and 3 months after delivery. Women with assisted vaginal delivery had lower odds of breastfeeding at 3 months after delivery compared with women with unassisted vaginal delivery. Initiation of breastfeeding within 30 minutes of delivery was associated with higher odds of breastfeeding at 1 and 3 months after delivery. Women who did not initiate breastfeeding during hospital stay but breastfed at 1 month after delivery had lower odds of breastfeeding at 3 months after delivery. Conclusions: The findings suggest the importance of conservative use of operative obstetrical intervention due to its negative impact on breastfeeding. Health professionals need to support mothers who have experienced cesarean and assisted vaginal delivery to increase their breastfeeding. Hospital staff should improve practice with respect to early initiation of breastfeeding. (BIRTH 34:2 June 2007) [source]


The Association of Couples' Relationship Status and Quality With Breastfeeding Initiation

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 5 2007
Christina M. Gibson-Davis
Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Survey (N= 3,567), we examine the links between relationship status, relationship quality, and race and ethnicity in breastfeeding initiation. We consider four relationship types: married, cohabiting, romantically involved but not cohabiting (termed visiting), and nonromantically involved mothers. We find that even after adjusting for a wide range of sociodemographic factors, married mothers were more likely to breastfeed than unmarried mothers and that racial and ethnic differences in breastfeeding do not result from differences in marriage rates. Among unwed mothers, paternal provision of money or other assistance during pregnancy decreases the likelihood of breastfeeding. We conclude that relationship status, above and beyond demographic characteristics, is an important correlate of breastfeeding. [source]


A Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Breastfeeding Intervention Delivery Methods

JOURNAL OF OBSTETRIC, GYNECOLOGIC & NEONATAL NURSING, Issue 6 2009
Barbara Pate
ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze breastfeeding intervention delivery methods to determine the likelihood of successful breastfeeding outcomes of e-based interventions compared to provider-based interventions. Data Sources: Eligible studies were identified by searching MEDLINE, CINAHL, Academic Search Elite, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition, SOC INDEX, and PsycINFO. Study Selection: Studies were included if they were conducted in a developed country, published between the years 2004 and 2008, included a concurrent control group, and reported frequency data on breastfeeding initiation or duration. The suitability of design and quality of execution were evaluated using the Centers for Disease Control procedure for systematic reviews. Twenty-one articles met the criteria for inclusion. Data Extraction: Study design, demographics, intervention/control conditions, settings, sampling strategies, potential threats to validity, and breastfeeding outcomes were abstracted and entered into a database for analysis and synthesis. Data Synthesis: Odds ratios were calculated for each individual study, and studies were stratified into 2 groups by intervention delivery type. The pooled results indicated that studies using e-based interventions had a moderate effect on breastfeeding (odds ratio=2.2 [1.9-2.7], d=0.5); whereas provider-based interventions had very little to no effect (odds ratio=1.1 [1.0-1.2], d=0.03). Conclusions: Results indicate that breastfeeding promotion programs delivered via the Internet may be an appealing alternative to time-consuming and expensive provider-based breastfeeding education and support. [source]


Epidural analgesia and breastfeeding: a randomised controlled trial of epidural techniques with and without fentanyl and a non-epidural comparison group

ANAESTHESIA, Issue 2 2010
M. J. A. Wilson
Summary We compared breastfeeding initiation and duration in 1054 nulliaparae randomised to bupivacaine Control epidural, Combined Spinal Epidural or Low Dose Infusion and 351 matched non-epidural comparisons. Women were interviewed after delivery and completed a postal questionnaire at 12 months. Regression analysis determined factors which independently predicted breastfeeding initiation. Breastfeeding duration was subjected to Kaplan,Meier analysis. A similar proportion of women in each epidural group initiated breastfeeding. Women with no epidural did not report a higher initiation rate relative to epidural groups and those who received pethidine reported a lower initiation rate than control epidural (p = 0.002). Older age groups (p < 0.001) and non-white ethnicity (p < 0.026) were predictive of breastfeeding. Epidural fentanyl dose, delivery mode and trial group were not predictive. Mean duration for breastfeeding was similar across epidural groups (Control 13.3, Combined Spinal Epidural 15.5, Low Dose Infusion 15.0 weeks). Our data do not support an effect of epidural fentanyl on breastfeeding initiation. [source]


Effect of Delivery Method and Timing of Breastfeeding Initiation on Breastfeeding Outcomes in Taiwan

BIRTH, Issue 2 2007
Li-Yin Chien RN
ABSTRACT: Background: Few studies have examined the independent effect of delivery method and timing of breastfeeding initiation on the prevalence of breastfeeding. The objectives of this study were to examine the effect of method of delivery and timing of breastfeeding initiation on the prevalence of breastfeeding at 1 and 3 months after delivery using a national sample from Taiwan. Methods: The study population of 2,064 women who gave birth to infants without congenital anomalies at hospitals in Taiwan from June through October 2003, inclusively, participated in a postal questionnaire survey. Results: Multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis showed that women with cesarean delivery had a lower odds of breastfeeding at 1 and 3 months after delivery. Women with assisted vaginal delivery had lower odds of breastfeeding at 3 months after delivery compared with women with unassisted vaginal delivery. Initiation of breastfeeding within 30 minutes of delivery was associated with higher odds of breastfeeding at 1 and 3 months after delivery. Women who did not initiate breastfeeding during hospital stay but breastfed at 1 month after delivery had lower odds of breastfeeding at 3 months after delivery. Conclusions: The findings suggest the importance of conservative use of operative obstetrical intervention due to its negative impact on breastfeeding. Health professionals need to support mothers who have experienced cesarean and assisted vaginal delivery to increase their breastfeeding. Hospital staff should improve practice with respect to early initiation of breastfeeding. (BIRTH 34:2 June 2007) [source]


Influence of Knowledge and Attitudes on Exclusive Breastfeeding Practice Among Rural Jamaican Mothers

BIRTH, Issue 4 2004
Leia M. Chatman BS
The impact of knowledge about and attitude toward breastfeeding on the duration of exclusive breastfeeding is also poorly understood. The objective of this study was to gather information about factors that influence exclusive breastfeeding and its duration. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 11 health centers within the parish of Saint Ann, Jamaica. A pretested questionnaire collected information on breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes toward intention to breastfeed and other relevant sociodemographic characteristics. Results: Information was documented for 599 mother-child pairs. The prevalence of breastfeeding initiation was 98.2 percent; of mothers who initiated breastfeeding, 22.2 percent practiced it exclusively (at least 6 months). No difference occurred between exclusive and nonexclusive breastfeeding mothers in terms of knowledge about and attitudes toward breastfeeding. Of potential predictors assessed, the male partner's role as the main source of income for the family was the only significant predictor for exclusive breastfeeding. Women whose male partner was the main source of income for the family were twice as likely to exclusively breastfeed their infants compared with the referent group (mothers as main source of income)(OR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.4,3.0). In addition, the dominant reason for partial breastfeeding was maternal anxiety that breastmilk alone might not provide sufficient nourishment. Conclusion: The level of exclusive breastfeeding was extremely low at the study site. Formulation of strategies to aggressively promote exclusive breastfeeding practices is urgently needed there. Such interventions should consider involvement of the male partner, especially, with respect to the financial support, as well as alleviating maternal anxiety regarding nutritional adequacy of breastmilk. [source]


Breastfeeding Rates in Hong Kong: A Comparison of the 1987 and 1997 Birth Cohorts

BIRTH, Issue 3 2002
Gabriel M. Leung MD
ABSTRACT: Background: Low breastfeeding rates are an issue of international public health concern. Anecdotal reports suggest very low breastfeeding rates in Asia, but no population-based studies have been conducted in the region. To determine the secular trend in breastfeeding practice in an Asian postindustrialized metropolitan community, we examined data from two population-based birth cohorts of Hong Kong infants in 1987 and 1997. Methods: Annual population rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration were estimated from the birth cohorts, considering the change in breastfeeding rates over 10 years with correction for sociodemographic and birth characteristics. Factors associated with breastfeeding practice were identified using multivariate logistic regression modeling in a pooled analysis of individual data of both cohorts. Results: Overall, 26.8 percent of mothers initiated breastfeeding in 1987, and the rate increased to 33.5 percent in 1997. The rate would have been 27.4 percent in 1987 if the distributions of method of delivery, birthweight, birth order, maternal age, education, and employment status had been the same as in 1997. Only 7.6 percent of infants remained on the breast for more than 1 month in 1987 compared with 20.4 percent a decade later. Similarly, the rate for breastfeeding more than 3 months increased from 3.9 to 10.3 percent. Total breastfeeding duration was significantly longer in 1997 than 10 years earlier. Conclusions: This is the first systematic report of secular variations of breastfeeding rates in Asia. Hong Kong should set higher but realistic goals for breastfeeding that emphasize both initiation and maintenance. Given the wide latitude for improvement in terms of readily modifiable risk factors, such as smoking and cesarean section, these new goals should focus on improving rates in these targeted groups where breastfeeding rates are lowest. (BIRTH 29:3 September 2002) [source]


Region of birth, income and breastfeeding in a Swedish county

ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 11 2009
T Wallby
Abstract Aim:, To study the relationship between maternal region of birth, disposable income and breastfeeding initiation and duration. Methods:, The study population consisted of 12 197 term born, singleton infants, born 1997,2001 in the county of Uppsala. Data on breastfeeding at 1 week, 6 months and 12 months were collected from the register of statistics of the Child Health Care Unit in Uppsala and socioeconomic indicators from Swedish national registers. Multivariate analysis was conducted using Cox regression. Results:, No influence of disposable income or region of birth on breastfeeding initiation was observed. Breastfeeding rates at 6 months were lower for mothers with disposable incomes in quartile 1,3 compared with mothers with the highest incomes in quartile 4 (hazard ratios (HRs) 0.88,0.90, adjusted HRs 0.92). The breastfeeding rates at 12 months were higher for mothers born in all regions compared with mothers born in Sweden (HRs 1.25,2.45, adjusted HRs 1.20,2.14). Conclusions:, The findings in the present study show that disposable income is a strong predictor for breastfeeding at 6 months in the Swedish context. Region of birth of the mother predicted long term breastfeeding, ,12 months. This calls for professionals in the maternity and child health care to pay extra attention to breastfeeding in low-income mothers in all ethnic groups. [source]


Intended plans for breastfeeding duration: a simple tool to predict breastfeeding outcome

ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 3 2003
AM Vogel
Prenatal intended duration of breastfeeding has been shown to be a powerful predictor of breastfeeding initiation and duration. This provides a tool to establish the risks for short duration of breastfeeding. Conclusion: It is necessary to identify the factors that influence mothers' plans, and to find means to intervene effectively. [source]