Breast Health (breast + health)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Cultural Perspectives of International Breast Health and Breast Cancer Education

JOURNAL OF NURSING SCHOLARSHIP, Issue 2 2007
Karen Dow Meneses
Purpose: To (a) describe teaching,learning strategies to foster cultural exchange among participants in the Train-The-Trainer (TTT) International Breast Health Program; (b) describe participants' perceptions of cultural influences on breast health and breast cancer; and (c) explore lessons learned about cultural influences on breast health TTT educational programs. Organizing Construct: The TTT curriculum was grounded in the belief that nurses can effectively deliver breast health and breast cancer education, that educational programs must be culturally relevant and sensitive to the needs of the target population, and that an urgent need exists worldwide to reduce the burden of breast cancer. Methods: A total of 32 nurses from 20 countries participated in three TTT programs held before the biennial meetings of the International Society of Nurses in Cancer Care (ISNCC) since 2000, with follow-up by E-mail survey. Narrative descriptions of their perspectives and experiences are reported. Results: Teaching,learning strategies incorporated cultural values into a TTT program to engage participants in sharing their individual and collective experiences about women with breast cancer. Conclusions: Developing countries are increasingly multicultural. Developed countries have large immigrant populations that generally maintain the cultural values and practices about breast cancer from the country of origin. These "lessons learned" are important in planning other educational programs. [source]


Young Women's Breast Health Needs

NURSING FOR WOMENS HEALTH, Issue 6 2002
Carolyn Davis Cockey
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Guidelines for International Breast Health and Cancer Control,Implementation

CANCER, Issue S8 2008
Article first published online: 3 OCT 200
First page of article [source]


Promoting breast health: older women's perceptions of an innovative intervention to enhance screening

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OLDER PEOPLE NURSING, Issue 2 2006
Robin Y. Wood EdD
Aims and objectives., This study is a continuation of prior funded research in which we tested the use of age and ethnically sensitive video breast health kits to increase knowledge about breast cancer and enhance the screening practices of breast self-examination and mammography among older Caucasian and African-American women. Background., Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women worldwide and accounts for 23% of all cancers. Mammography is currently the best procedure available for mass screening of breast cancer. However, underutilization of mammography is a problem among older women in the United States. Elders are at the greatest risk for developing and dying from breast cancer but they are the least likely group to be screened routinely with mammograms or to practice breast self-examination, particularly if they are African-American. Design., Participatory qualitative evaluation focus groups were used to assess the overall impact of the video kit intervention programme and to elucidate the quantitative findings of the original study. Methods., Four focus groups were conducted in two diverse settings with a purposive sample of 23 participants (N = 23). The overall sample was predominantly African-American (87%) with mean age of 71 7.9 years and mean education completed of 12 3.4 years. Results., Five major themes emerged from group discussions: usability and appeal of the intervention, fear and empowerment, personal relevance and intergenerational sharing, impact on screening behaviours, and story telling. Conclusions., Analyses suggest that customized media materials constructed especially for older African-American women empowered participants in this sample to action regarding their own breast health. Relevance to clinical practice., These findings may translate to global populations where risk is increasing but screening programmes are not widely available. Given that older women are historically difficult to access and impact, further design and evaluation of innovative and sensitive educational programmes such as the one described here are recommended. [source]


Cultural Perspectives of International Breast Health and Breast Cancer Education

JOURNAL OF NURSING SCHOLARSHIP, Issue 2 2007
Karen Dow Meneses
Purpose: To (a) describe teaching,learning strategies to foster cultural exchange among participants in the Train-The-Trainer (TTT) International Breast Health Program; (b) describe participants' perceptions of cultural influences on breast health and breast cancer; and (c) explore lessons learned about cultural influences on breast health TTT educational programs. Organizing Construct: The TTT curriculum was grounded in the belief that nurses can effectively deliver breast health and breast cancer education, that educational programs must be culturally relevant and sensitive to the needs of the target population, and that an urgent need exists worldwide to reduce the burden of breast cancer. Methods: A total of 32 nurses from 20 countries participated in three TTT programs held before the biennial meetings of the International Society of Nurses in Cancer Care (ISNCC) since 2000, with follow-up by E-mail survey. Narrative descriptions of their perspectives and experiences are reported. Results: Teaching,learning strategies incorporated cultural values into a TTT program to engage participants in sharing their individual and collective experiences about women with breast cancer. Conclusions: Developing countries are increasingly multicultural. Developed countries have large immigrant populations that generally maintain the cultural values and practices about breast cancer from the country of origin. These "lessons learned" are important in planning other educational programs. [source]


Why Current Breast Pathology Practices Must Be Evaluated.

THE BREAST JOURNAL, Issue 5 2007
A Susan G. Komen for the Cure White Paper: June 200
To this end, the organization has a strong interest and proven track record in ensuring public investment in quality breast health and breast cancer care. Recently, Susan G. Komen for the Cure identified major issues in the practice of pathology that have a negative impact on the lives of thousands of breast cancer patients in the United States. These issues were identified through a comprehensive literature review and interviews conducted in 2005,2006 with experts in oncology, breast pathology, surgery, and radiology. The interviewees practiced in community, academic, and cooperative group settings. Komen for the Cure has identified four areas that have a direct impact on the quality of care breast cancer patients receive in the United States, the accuracy of breast pathology diagnostics, the effects of current health insurance, and reimbursement policies on patients who are evaluated for a possible breast cancer diagnosis, the substantial decrease in tissue banking participation, particularly during a time of rapid advances in biologically correlated clinical science and the role for the Susan G. Komen for the Cure, pathology professional societies and the Federal government in ensuring that breast pathology practices meet the highest possible standards in the United States Concerns surrounding the quality and practice of breast pathology are not limited to diagnostic accuracy. Other considerations include, training and proficiency of pathologists who are evaluating breast specimens, the lack of integration of pathologists in the clinical care team, inadequate compensation for the amount of work required to thoroughly analyze specimens, potential loss in translational research as a result of medical privacy regulations, and the lack of mandatory uniform pathology practice standards without any way to measure the degree of variation or to remedy it. [source]