Breast Cancer Survival (breast + cancer_survival)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Exercise Can Improve Breast Cancer Survival

CA: A CANCER JOURNAL FOR CLINICIANS, Issue 5 2005
Article first published online: 31 DEC 200
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Breast cancer survival in England, Norway and Sweden: a population-based comparison,

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CANCER, Issue 11 2010
Henrik Møller
Abstract Several international studies have found that survival from breast cancer is lower in the United Kingdom than in some other European countries. We have compared breast cancer survival between the national populations of England, Norway and Sweden, with a view to identifying subsets of patients with particularly good or adverse survival outcomes. We extracted cases of breast cancer in women diagnosed 1996,2004 from the national cancer registries of the 3 countries. The study comprised 303,657 English cases, 24,919 Norwegian cases and 57,512 cases from Sweden. Follow-up was in 2001,2004. The main outcome measures were 5-year cumulative relative survival and excess death rates, stratified by age and period of follow-up. In comparison with Norway and Sweden, the excess mortality in England was particularly pronounced in the first month and in the first year after diagnosis, and generally more marked in the oldest age groups. Compared with Norwegian patients, 81% of the excess deaths in the English patients occurred in the first 2 years after diagnosis. Our findings emphasise the importance of awareness of symptoms and early detection as the main strategy to improve breast cancer survival in the United Kingdom. [source]


Role of the Clinical Breast Examination in Breast Cancer Screening

JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 7 2001
Does This Patient Have Breast Cancer?
QUESTION: The authors, in an article for the JAMA section on the rational clinical examination, consider the evidence on whether and how to use clinical breast examination as a cancer screening technique. BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a common disease, particularly in older women. The authors note that by age 70 the annual incidence of breast cancer is one in 200 women. Breast cancer survival is strongly influenced by the stage of the disease at the time of diagnosis. As a result, it is important to consider how best to screen for this disease. In recent years there has been considerable attention in the clinical literature and in the popular media paid to the screening strategies of breast self-examination and of screening mammography, but somewhat less to the potential role of the breast examination by the healthcare provider. In actual clinical practice, the same woman may be the recipient of any, none, or all of these screening modalities. The best way to combine these screening strategies, particularly in the case of the older woman, remains a subject of some uncertainty and controversy. DATA SOURCES: Data were obtained from a MEDLINE search of the English-language literature for 1966 through 1997 and additional articles as identified by the authors. STUDY SELECTION CRITERIA: In their evaluation of the effectiveness of clinical breast examination, the authors included both controlled trials and case-controlled studies in which clinical breast examination was used as a component of the screening. Study of breast examination technique considered both clinical studies and studies using silicone breast models. DATA EXTRACTION: The combined data from the trials included information on approximately 200,000 women who received a breast cancer screening intervention (mammography and/or clinical breast examination). However, none of the studies made the direct comparison of a group receiving clinical breast examination as a sole intervention with a control group that did not receive any screening. Data on the utility of clinical breast examination were partially derived from studies where that screening modality was used in combination with mammography. MAIN RESULTS: A number of trials of cancer screening have demonstrated a reduction in mortality from the use of mammography and clinical breast examination as combined screening strategies compared with no screening, with the inference that the reduction in mortality comes from the earlier detection of breast cancer. The percentage of the detected cancers that are detected in the trials by clinical breast examination despite having been missed on mammography varies across the trials from a low of 3% of the detected cancers to a high of 45%. It is speculative whether the marginal contribution of clinical breast examination to the mortality reduction in these screening trials corresponds to the percentage of cancers detected by clinical breast examination alone. In most of the clinical trials, the technique of breast examination reportedly was not well described. It is unclear therefore how much the technique of breast examination used varied within and among the clinical trials. Data from studies using examinations of breast models made of silicone demonstrated that test performance accuracy correlated with a lengthier breast examination, better breast examination technique, and perhaps with examiner experience. The report includes data from six comparator studies and from two demonstration projects. Of the six comparator studies, four compared a screened population with an unscreened population and two compared different intensities of screening strategies. None of the eight clinical trials was directed to a geriatric population and in fact older women were excluded by upper age entry criteria from the six comparator studies. (The upper age limit for study entry in the six comparator studies varied from 49 to 64.) CONCLUSION: The authors drew on the pooled results of these eight studies to conclude that clinical breast examination has a sensitivity of 54% (95% confidence interval, 48.3,59.8) and a specificity of 94% (95% confidence interval, 90.2,96.9). The authors conclude that screening clinical breast examination should be done for women age older than 40. [source]


Breast cancer survival in England, Norway and Sweden: a population-based comparison,

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CANCER, Issue 11 2010
Henrik Møller
Abstract Several international studies have found that survival from breast cancer is lower in the United Kingdom than in some other European countries. We have compared breast cancer survival between the national populations of England, Norway and Sweden, with a view to identifying subsets of patients with particularly good or adverse survival outcomes. We extracted cases of breast cancer in women diagnosed 1996,2004 from the national cancer registries of the 3 countries. The study comprised 303,657 English cases, 24,919 Norwegian cases and 57,512 cases from Sweden. Follow-up was in 2001,2004. The main outcome measures were 5-year cumulative relative survival and excess death rates, stratified by age and period of follow-up. In comparison with Norway and Sweden, the excess mortality in England was particularly pronounced in the first month and in the first year after diagnosis, and generally more marked in the oldest age groups. Compared with Norwegian patients, 81% of the excess deaths in the English patients occurred in the first 2 years after diagnosis. Our findings emphasise the importance of awareness of symptoms and early detection as the main strategy to improve breast cancer survival in the United Kingdom. [source]


Social class is an important and independent prognostic factor of breast cancer mortality

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CANCER, Issue 5 2006
Christine Bouchardy
Abstract Reasons of the important impact of socioeconomic status on breast cancer prognosis are far from established. This study aims to evaluate and explain the social disparities in breast cancer survival in the Swiss canton of Geneva, where healthcare costs and life expectancy are among the highest in the world. This population-based study included all 3,920 female residents of Geneva, who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer before the age of 70 years between 1980 and 2000. Patients were divided into 4 socioeconomic groups, according to the woman's last occupation. We used Cox multivariate regression analysis to identify reasons for the socioeconomic inequalities in breast cancer survival. Compared to patients of high social class, those of low social class had an increased risk (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] 2.4, 95% CI: 1.6,3.5) of dying as a result of breast cancer. These women were more often foreigners, less frequently had screen-detected cancer and were at more advanced stage at diagnosis. They less frequently underwent breast-conserving surgery, hormonal therapy, and chemotherapy, in particular, in case of axillary lymph node involvement. When adjusting for all these factors, patients of low social class still had a significantly increased risk of dying of breast cancer (HR 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2,2.6). Overmortality linked to low SES is only partly explained by delayed diagnosis, unfavorable tumor characteristics and suboptimal treatments. Other factors, not measured in this study, also could play a role. While waiting for the outcome of other researches, we should consider socioeconomic status as an independent prognostic factor and provide intensified support and surveillance to women of low social class. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Recruiting and retaining breast cancer survivors into a randomized controlled exercise trial,

CANCER, Issue S11 2008
Survivorship Study, The Yale Exercise
Abstract BACKGROUND. Given observational findings that physical activity reduces breast cancer risk, improves survival, and improves quality of life in breast cancer survivors, a need has been identified for randomized controlled trials that testthe efficacy of exercise on biological mechanisms associated with breast cancer survival. The primary aims of the Yale Exercise and Survivorship Study were to 1) determine the feasibility of recruiting breast cancer survivors into a randomized controlled trial of the effects of exercise on biological markers and/or mechanisms associated with survival, 2) compare the effectiveness of various recruitment strategies on accrual rates and baseline characteristics, and 3) report adherence to the exercise trial. METHODS. Seventy-five postmenopausal breast cancer survivors self-referred into the trial or were recruited through the Connecticut Tumor Registry and randomly assigned to an exercise (n = 37) or usual-care (n = 38) group. The exercise group participated in 150 min/wk of supervised gym-based and home-based aerobic exercise for 6 months. The usual-care group was instructed to maintain current physical activity level. RESULTS. A total of 75 women (an accrual rate of 9.5%) were randomized to the trial. Rates of accrual were higher for women who self-referred into the study (19.8%) compared with women recruited via the cancer registry (7.6%); however, demographic, physiologic, and prognostic characteristics did not differ between the 2 recruitment strategies. On average, exercisers increased moderate- intensity to vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise by 129 minutes per week compared with 44 minutes per week among usual-care participants (P < .001). Women in the exercise-intervention group increased their average pedometer steps by 1621 steps per day compared with a decrease of 60 steps per day among women in the usual-care group (P < .01). CONCLUSIONS. Findings from this study will provide useful information for investigators who are conducting exercise trials in cancer populations, clinicians who are treating women diagnosed with breast cancer, and exercise professionals who are developing community-based exercise programs for cancer survivors. Cancer 2008. © 2008 American Cancer Society. [source]


Expression patterns of the ATM gene in mammary tissues and their associations with breast cancer survival

CANCER, Issue 9 2007
Chuanzhong Ye MD
Abstract BACKGROUND. The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene plays a critical role in cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis, and DNA repair. However, to date, no study has directly investigated the association between ATM gene expression and breast cancer survival. METHODS. ATM gene expression levels were evaluated in tumor and adjacent normal tissue from patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer or BBD using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays. Cox regression models were used to evaluate the association of ATM gene expression and survival in a cohort of 471 breast cancer patients. RESULTS. In breast cancer cases, ATM expression in cancer tissues was decreased by approximately 50% compared with adjacent normal tissues from the same patients. In BBD cases, the expression level of the ATM gene was similar in benign tumor tissue and adjacent normal tissues. No apparent difference was found in ATM gene expression levels in adjacent normal tissues obtained from cancer patients or BBD controls. Compared with patients with the lowest tertile of the ATM mRNA, patients in the upper 2 tertiles had more favorable disease-free survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.46, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.30,0.73 and HR = 0.52, 95% CI: 0.33,0.81, respectively) and overall survival (HR = 0.56, 95% CI: 0.35,0.92 and HR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.43,1.13, respectively). CONCLUSIONS. The ATM gene expression was down-regulated in breast cancer tissues and a high ATM gene expression level in breast cancer tissue was associated with a favorable prognosis. Cancer 2007. © 2007 American Cancer Society. [source]