Breast Biopsy (breast + biopsy)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Follow-Up Recommendations for Benign Breast Biopsies

THE BREAST JOURNAL, Issue 5 2006
Susanna Shin MD
Abstract: Histologically proven benign breast disease increases a woman's relative risk for subsequent cancer development. Yet follow-up guidelines for mammogram and clinical breast examination after a benign breast biopsy are lacking. Our objective was to determine if increased surveillance is indicated following a benign breast biopsy. Following institutional review board approval, a retrospective database review was conducted of prospectively gathered patients who had a benign breast biopsy (core or excisional) for an abnormality detected on mammogram, ultrasound, or clinical breast examination. Follow-up, for all subjects, was a clinical breast examination and mammogram or ultrasound at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after benign breast biopsy by a breast surgeon. End points were the need for additional biopsies or cancer detection. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-squared analysis. From January 2000 to July 2003, 156 patients age 18,86 years had a benign breast biopsy. During the 2 year follow-up, 20 patients (13%) required a subsequent biopsy. No significant difference was observed in mean age, race, menarche, menopause, parity, age at first live birth, use of oral contraceptives, history of prior biopsy, or the pathology of the initial lesion between those who needed a subsequent biopsy and those who did not. Seven excisional biopsies were performed (one at 6 months, four at 1 year, and two at 2 years follow-up) for growth of the benign breast biopsy lesion, and pathology remained concordant with the original diagnosis. Thirteen biopsies were done for new findings on mammogram or ultrasound. Three of these (1.9%) yielded a cancer diagnosis (one at 6 months, one at 1 year, and one at 2 years follow-up). No new lesions were identified on follow-up by clinical breast examination alone. Increased surveillance following a benign breast biopsy is necessary because of the increased need for subsequent biopsy or risk of cancer development. This should include imaging (mammography or ultrasound) and a clinical breast examination 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after a benign breast biopsy. [source]


Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia in Stereotactic Breast Biopsies: Enhanced Accuracy of Diagnosis with the Mammotome

THE BREAST JOURNAL, Issue 4 2001
Megha Joshi MD
Abstract: There is little literature assessing the incidence of subsequent carcinoma in patients diagnosed with atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) by mammotome. We reviewed 216 stereotactic mammotome biopsies (SMBs) and compared the results to the 121 automated tru-cut biopsies (ATC) performed at our breast care center from June 1994 to July 1998. The median age in the mammotome series was 57 years, compared to 56 years in the ATC group. An increase in biopsies for microcalcifications (49% versus 41%) was noted in the SMB series. This was accompanied by an increase in the number of cases with a diagnosis of pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (10% versus 4%). Compared to the tru-cut, in which 38% (3 of 8) of the cases diagnosed as atypical hyperplasia (AH) showed DCIS and/or invasive carcinoma on open biopsy, none of the cases diagnosed as AH on mammotome revealed carcinoma on open biopsy. ADH is more accurately diagnosed with SMB than by the ATC method and may not be an indication for subsequent open biopsy. [source]


Histologic Heterogeneity of Masses at Percutaneous Breast Biopsy

THE BREAST JOURNAL, Issue 4 2002
Elizabeth A. Morris MD
The purpose of this study was to determine whether different histologic findings are obtained from different areas of breast masses seen on mammography when targeted on stereotactic breast biopsy. Twenty-one masses (mean size, 1.8 cm; range, 0.7,5.5 cm) underwent stereotactic biopsy using a 14-gauge directional vacuum-assisted biopsy probe (Mammotome, Biopsys/Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Cincinnati, OH). The central and peripheral areas of the mass were targeted and biopsied separately, and histologic findings from the targeted center and periphery were compared. Six of 21 masses (29%) were heterogeneous, yielding different histologic results from the targeted center and periphery. In 4 heterogeneous masses, which constituted 4 of 21 masses (19%) in this study, surgical biopsy was recommended on the basis of findings obtained from only the center (n = 2) or the periphery (n = 2). Stereotactic biopsy findings in these 4 masses were atypia in 3 and radial scar in 1; none of these 4 masses had carcinoma at surgery. In all 4 masses that proved to be malignant, the diagnosis of carcinoma was made in specimens obtained from both the targeted center and the periphery of the mass. Breast masses can be heterogeneous, yielding different histologic findings from different areas of the mass. Our data suggest that sampling part but not all of a mass may miss certain histologic components of the mass, but should not result in a failure to diagnose carcinoma. [source]


Application of image-guided biopsy for impalpable breast lesions in Chinese women

ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Issue 1-2 2003
Flora H. F. Tsang
Background: Screening for breast cancer has resulted in an increasing number of mammographically detected lesions that require further management. The Advanced Breast Biopsy Instrumentation system is a recently added biopsy technique for the management of such lesions. The present paper will review the authors' experience in the use of this procedure in Chinese patients whose breast volume was smaller than that of Caucasians. Methods: Ninety-three patients were listed for the procedure and 78 (84%) underwent the procedure successfully. Ninety-two lesions were biopsied. Advanced Breast Biopsy Instrumentation (ABBI) was performed for clustered microcalcifications or abnormal mass/density. Minimally Invasive Breast Biopsy (MIBB), a suction-assisted core biopsy device, was employed for more scattered lesions. For small volume breasts, it may be required to bring the hand through the aperture to get the targeted lesions onto the digital image or, in the case of ABBI, to excise just beyond the deep margin of the lesion rather than the recommended depth. Results: The ABBI was performed for 43 (46.7%) lesions and MIBB for 49 (53.3%) lesions. Nine (9.8%) were diagnosed to have ductal carcinoma in situ, two (2.2%) had ductal carcinoma in situ with microinvasion and eight (8.7%) had invasive ductal carcinoma. All the malignant lesions required further management. In addition, 19 (20.7%) were found to have atypical hyperplasia. Patients' satisfaction and cosmetic outcome are good. Conclusion: The ABBI and MIBB procedures can be applied satisfactorily for biopsy of mammographic lesions with good ­cosmetic outcome in Chinese patients. [source]


Psychosocial adjustment in children of mothers with breast cancer

PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY, Issue 5 2001
Lizbeth A. Hoke
Thirty-five children of 28 mothers diagnosed with breast cancer during the previous year were compared to 34 children of 24 mothers with recent benign breast biopsies. Mothers and children, ages 8,16, completed questionnaires about mood, behavior problems and social functioning to assess whether children of mothers with breast cancer were at increased risk for adjustment problems. Significant differences were not found between children in the breast cancer group and the comparison group on any of the measures, even though mothers with breast cancer reported more psychological distress than mothers with benign biopsies. In addition, children in both groups were functioning better than normative samples on some adjustment measures. Variables measuring the mother's illness and treatment were not significantly related to children's adjustment in the breast cancer group. Findings suggested that some adolescents whose mothers had breast cancer did better in social and academic activities when their mothers were more distressed, while adolescents whose mothers had benign biopsies did less well when their mothers were distressed. The study's small sample size limits conclusions that can be drawn; however, clinical and research implications are discussed, given other reports that some children of parents with cancer may experience adjustment problems. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Review of 125 SiteSelect Stereotactic Large-Core Breast Biopsy Procedures

THE BREAST JOURNAL, Issue 3 2003
Christa C. Corn MD
Abstract: Advances in stereotactic breast biopsies have introduced a variety of devices that yield different sizes of tissue samples. The choice of biopsy device should be based on which technique is most likely to yield a definitive diagnosis at the time of the initial biopsy. This is a prospective study of 104 patients who underwent a total of 125 stereotactic breast biopsies using the SiteSelect large-core biopsy device. From May 1999 to June 2001, 104 patients underwent 125 stereotactic breast biopsies with the SiteSelect large-core biopsy device. One hundred four 15 mm SiteSelect biopsies, eighteen 10 mm SiteSelect biopsies, and three 22 mm SiteSelect biopsies were performed. Atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were found in 15% of the biopsies and infiltrating cancer was found in another 15% of the biopsies. Seventy-eight percent of the ADH and 90% of the DCIS lesions were associated with indeterminate calcifications noted on mammogram. Two of the 22 mm SiteSelect excisions yielded a specimen that contained the entire cancer with clear surgical margins. All of the patients with DCIS or invasive carcinoma underwent definitive surgical and adjuvant therapy. The sensitivity and specificity of SiteSelect in this series of patients was 100%. The SiteSelect biopsy procedure is safe, well tolerated by patients, and can be performed under local anesthesia. SiteSelect is comparable to an open excisional biopsy in its ability to obtain adequate tissue for accurate diagnosis, but excises significantly less normal surrounding breast tissue. Based on the data, indications for primary use of SiteSelect are indeterminate calcifications on mammogram, rebiopsy of a vacuum-assisted biopsy site that yielded atypia on pathologic examination, and complete excision of a lesion suspicious for invasive carcinoma in order to assess actual size and margin status. [source]


From Adjuvant Therapy to Breast Cancer Prevention: BCPT and STAR

THE BREAST JOURNAL, Issue 3 2001
Barbara K. Dunn MD
Abstract: The continued widespread prevalence of breast cancer supports placing a high priority on research aimed at its primary prevention, particularly among women who are at increased risk for developing this disease. The suggestion of potential agents for the primary chemoprevention of breast cancer evolved out of the treatment setting. Extensive experience with tamoxifen, a first-generation selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) showing efficacy, first, in the treatment of advanced breast cancer and, subsequently, as adjuvant therapy for early stage disease established the safety of this agent. Cumulative data from multiple adjuvant studies documented the efficacy of tamoxifen in reducing second primary breast cancers in the contralateral breast, supporting its potential as a chemopreventive agent for breast cancer. The safety and second primary data on tamoxifen, together with extensive information on its pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and antitumor effects, as well as its potentially beneficial effects on lipid metabolism and osteoporosis, led the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) to select tamoxifen for testing in the first prospective randomized phase III trial of the efficacy of a chemopreventive agent for preventing breast cancer in women at increased risk of the disease. Accordingly, in 1992 the NSABP started the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (P-1) in which 13,388 women 35 years of age who were at increased risk of breast cancer according to Gail model risk factors [family history, age, and personal history (i.e., age at first birth, age at menarche, previous breast biopsies)] were randomized to tamoxifen 20 mg/day or placebo for 5 years. Through 69 months of follow-up tamoxifen reduced the risk of invasive breast cancer, primarily estrogen receptor-positive tumors, by 49% (two-sided p < 0.00001). Tamoxifen reduced the risk of noninvasive breast cancer by 50% (two-sided p < 0.002). In addition, tamoxifen reduced fractures of the hip, radius, and spine, but it had no effect on the rate of ischemic heart disease. As previously shown, the rates of endometrial cancer and vascular events increased with tamoxifen. With the P-1 results establishing tamoxifen as the standard of care for the primary chemoprevention of breast cancer in high-risk women, concern over the side effects of tamoxifen has prompted a continuing search for an agent that displays a more desirable efficacy/toxicity profile. Raloxifene, a second-generation SERM approved for the prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, displays antiestrogenic properties in the breast and possibly the endometrium, and estrogenic effects in the bone and on the lipid profile, suggesting it as a candidate for comparison with the chemopreventive standard, tamoxifen. Raloxifene will be compared to tamoxifen in an equivalency trial, the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) NSABP P-2, which began in July 1999 at almost 500 centers in North America. The plan is to randomize 22,000 postmenopausal women 35 years of age at increased risk of breast cancer by Gail criteria to tamoxifen 20 mg/day or raloxifene 60 mg/day for 5 years. Study endpoints include invasive and noninvasive breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, endometrial cancer, bone fractures, and vascular events. [source]


Rapidly growing nodular pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia of the breast in an 18-year-old girl,

APMIS, Issue 5 2006
Case report
Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a rare benign proliferation of mesenchymal stromal cells with irregular slit-like formations resembling angiomatous structures. In the majority of cases this lesion is a focal microscopic finding in breast biopsies performed for benign or malignant diseases. It may present in a pure diffuse or nodular form. The exact etiology and pathogenesis of this tumor-like lesion is still unknown, but a proliferative response of myofibroblasts to hormonal stimuli has been postulated. A large 12×9×3.5 cm rapidly growing nodular form of PASH of the breast in an 18-year-old woman is here described with clinical and histological findings. A possible hormonal etiology was indicated by elevated progesterone (three-fold) and decreased estrogen serum levels. Different diagnostic lesions, such as giant fibroadenoma and low-grade angiosarcoma, are discussed. To the authors' knowledge this is only the fourth case of nodular PASH of the breast reported in the English literature. [source]


Assessment of "grading" with Ki-67 and c-kit immunohistochemical expressions may be a helpful tool in management of patients with flat epithelial atypia (FEA) and columnar cell lesions (CCLs) on core breast biopsy

JOURNAL OF CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY, Issue 2 2009
Rosa M. Tomasino
It is essential to reach a better understanding of "flat epithelial atypia/columnar cell lesions" (FEA/CCLs) in breast core biopsies. Our aim was to explore their biological nature, in order to predict the likelihood of an upgrade to carcinoma. "Cytological grading" has been specially focused, in view of its possible utility in the choice of management. One hundred thirty of a total of 900 cases core needle (CN)/vacuum-assisted biopsies (VABs), with diagnoses of "hyperplasia" and "atypia" were retrospectively re-evaluated. Pathological findings of further excision biopsies (FEBs) performed in 40/75 patients with follow-up were compared with the previous diagnoses. In all cases, both Ki-67 and c-kit immunoreactivities were explored and compared with both normal breast tissues and subsequently documented cancers, with special reference to the hyperplastic FEA/CCLs, with "mild" atypia (FEA/CCHAm). Sixteen cases were re-diagnosed as "usual ductal hyperplasia" (UDH), 60 as "columnar cell hyperplasia" (CCH), and 54 as FEA/CCHA, 30 of which FEA/CCHAm and 24 FEA/CCHAh (with high atypia). Significantly, the Ki-67 index proved to be on the increase and c-kit expression on the decrease in FEA/CCHA lesions, mainly in the FEA/CCHAh group and in the subsequently observed cancers, compared with either benign tissues or the FEA/CCH cases. It was also significant that most of the carcinomas were found in FEBs within the FEA/CCHAh group. In this study cytological grading, together with Ki-67 and c-kit indices, proved to be helpful in FEA/CCLs evaluation. With regard to FEA/CCHAm lesions, an adequate surveillance appears to be a more appropriate management tool than FEB, as a result of their biological nature and behavior. J. Cell. Physiol. 221: 343,349, 2009. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Follow-Up Recommendations for Benign Breast Biopsies

THE BREAST JOURNAL, Issue 5 2006
Susanna Shin MD
Abstract: Histologically proven benign breast disease increases a woman's relative risk for subsequent cancer development. Yet follow-up guidelines for mammogram and clinical breast examination after a benign breast biopsy are lacking. Our objective was to determine if increased surveillance is indicated following a benign breast biopsy. Following institutional review board approval, a retrospective database review was conducted of prospectively gathered patients who had a benign breast biopsy (core or excisional) for an abnormality detected on mammogram, ultrasound, or clinical breast examination. Follow-up, for all subjects, was a clinical breast examination and mammogram or ultrasound at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after benign breast biopsy by a breast surgeon. End points were the need for additional biopsies or cancer detection. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-squared analysis. From January 2000 to July 2003, 156 patients age 18,86 years had a benign breast biopsy. During the 2 year follow-up, 20 patients (13%) required a subsequent biopsy. No significant difference was observed in mean age, race, menarche, menopause, parity, age at first live birth, use of oral contraceptives, history of prior biopsy, or the pathology of the initial lesion between those who needed a subsequent biopsy and those who did not. Seven excisional biopsies were performed (one at 6 months, four at 1 year, and two at 2 years follow-up) for growth of the benign breast biopsy lesion, and pathology remained concordant with the original diagnosis. Thirteen biopsies were done for new findings on mammogram or ultrasound. Three of these (1.9%) yielded a cancer diagnosis (one at 6 months, one at 1 year, and one at 2 years follow-up). No new lesions were identified on follow-up by clinical breast examination alone. Increased surveillance following a benign breast biopsy is necessary because of the increased need for subsequent biopsy or risk of cancer development. This should include imaging (mammography or ultrasound) and a clinical breast examination 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after a benign breast biopsy. [source]


Histologic Heterogeneity of Masses at Percutaneous Breast Biopsy

THE BREAST JOURNAL, Issue 4 2002
Elizabeth A. Morris MD
The purpose of this study was to determine whether different histologic findings are obtained from different areas of breast masses seen on mammography when targeted on stereotactic breast biopsy. Twenty-one masses (mean size, 1.8 cm; range, 0.7,5.5 cm) underwent stereotactic biopsy using a 14-gauge directional vacuum-assisted biopsy probe (Mammotome, Biopsys/Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Cincinnati, OH). The central and peripheral areas of the mass were targeted and biopsied separately, and histologic findings from the targeted center and periphery were compared. Six of 21 masses (29%) were heterogeneous, yielding different histologic results from the targeted center and periphery. In 4 heterogeneous masses, which constituted 4 of 21 masses (19%) in this study, surgical biopsy was recommended on the basis of findings obtained from only the center (n = 2) or the periphery (n = 2). Stereotactic biopsy findings in these 4 masses were atypia in 3 and radial scar in 1; none of these 4 masses had carcinoma at surgery. In all 4 masses that proved to be malignant, the diagnosis of carcinoma was made in specimens obtained from both the targeted center and the periphery of the mass. Breast masses can be heterogeneous, yielding different histologic findings from different areas of the mass. Our data suggest that sampling part but not all of a mass may miss certain histologic components of the mass, but should not result in a failure to diagnose carcinoma. [source]


Stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy in 2874 patients

CANCER, Issue 2 2004
A multicenter study
Abstract BACKGROUND Vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VAB) can replace surgical biopsy for the diagnosis of breast carcinoma. The authors evaluated the accuracy and clinical utility of VAB in a multicenter setting using a strict quality assurance protocol. METHODS In the current study, VABs were performed successfully for 2874 patients at 5 sites. Benign lesions were verified by follow-up. Surgery was recommended for malignant and borderline lesions. VAB was performed on patients with lesions rated as highly suspicious (6%), intermediate to suspicious (85%), or probably benign (9%). Fifty-eight percent of the lesions were < 10 mm and 70% had microcalcifications. RESULTS The authors identified 7% of patients with invasive carcinomas, 15% with ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS), 5% with atypical ductal hyperplasias (ADH), and 0.6% with lobular carcinomas in situ. The results of the VAB necessitated an upgrade of 24% of patients with ADH to DCIS or DCIS and invasive carcinoma. Twelve percent of patients with DCIS proved to have invasive carcinoma. Seventy-three percent of the patients had benign lesions. Only 1 false-negative result was encountered (negative predictive value, 99.95%). Minor side effects were reported to occur in 1.4% of patients and 0.1% of patients required a subsequent intervention. Scarring relevant for mammography was rare among patients (i.e., 0.3% of patients had relevant scarring). CONCLUSIONS Quality-assured VAB was found to be highly reliable. VAB effectively identified patients with benign lesions and assisted therapeutic decisions. Most important, only a single case of malignancy was missed. A close interdisciplinary approach assured optimal results. Cancer 2004;100:245,51. © 2003 American Cancer Society. [source]