Botulinum Toxin Type B (botulinum + toxin_type_b)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Myobloc (Botulinum Toxin Type B) for the Treatment of Palmar Hyperhidrosis

DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY, Issue 3 2005
Leslie Baumann MD
Background Palmar hyperhidrosis is a problem of unknown etiology that affects patients both socially and professionally. Botulinum toxin type B (Myobloc), approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of cervical dystonia in the United States in December 2000, has subsequently been used effectively in an off-label indication to treat hyperhidrosis. There are sparse data, however, in the literature evaluating the safety and efficacy of BTX-B for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis. Objective We evaluated the safety and efficacy of Myobloc in the treatment of bilateral palmar hyperhidrosis. This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study to report on the safety and efficacy of Myobloc. Methods Twenty participants (10 men, 10 women) diagnosed with palmar hyperhidrosis were injected with either Myobloc (5,000 U per palm) or a 1.0 mL vehicle (100 mM NaCl, 10 mM succinate, and 0.5 mg/mL human albumin) into bilateral palms (15 Myobloc, 5 placebo). The participants were followed until sweating returned to baseline levels. The main outcome measures were safety, efficacy versus placebo, and duration of effect. Results A significant difference was found in treatment response at day 30, as determined by participant assessments, between 15 participants injected with Myobloc and 3 participants injected with placebo. The duration of action, calculated in the 17 participants who received Myobloc injections and completed the study, ranged from 2.3 to 4.9 months, with a mean duration of 3.8 months. The single most reported adverse event was dry mouth or throat, which was reported by 18 of 20 participants. The adverse event profile also included indigestion or heartburn (60%), excessively dry hands (60%), muscle weakness (60%), and decreased grip strength (50%). Conclusion Myobloc proved to be efficacious for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis. Myobloc had a rapid onset, with most participants responding within 1 week. The duration of action ranged from 2.3 to 4.9 months, with a mean of 3.8 months. The adverse event profile included dry mouth, indigestion or heartburn, excessively dry hands, muscle weakness, and decreased grip strength. MYOBLOC WAS PROVIDED FOR THIS STUDY BY ELAN PHARMACEUTICALS. [source]


Botulinum Toxin Type B for Dynamic Glabellar Rhytides Refractory to Botulinum Toxin Type A

DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY, Issue 5 2003
Tina S. Alster MD
Background. Botulinum toxin type B (BTX-B; Myobloc) has recently been introduced for the treatment of dynamic rhytides. This serotype is structurally similar to botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A; Botox) and appears to produce equivalent muscular paralysis. Because of the fact that some patients may become resistant to the effects of BTX-A with its continued use or may require large doses of type A to exert adequate muscular paralysis, the use of BTX-B may prove beneficial in these cases. Objective. To determine the effect of BTX-B on glabellar rhytides refractory or showing decreased clinical effect to treatment with BTX-A. Methods. Twenty females (mean age, 43 years) with vertical glabellar rhytides showing decreased or negligible clinical effect to BTX-A were treated with intramuscular injections of BTX-B. Five standardized intramuscular sites (procerus, inferomedial corrugator muscles, superior middle corrugator muscles) received a total dose of 2,500 U. Patients were evaluated at pretreatment and 48 to 72 hours, 1 week, and 2 and 4 months after injection. Results. All glabellar rhytides improved after treatment with BTX-B injections. Peak clinical effect was noted 1 month after treatment, with 50% of peak effect evident at the 2-month follow-up. Near complete dissolution of effect was seen at 4 months after treatment. Side effects were transient and were limited to moderate injectional pain and rare bruising and frontal brow tightness. Conclusions. BTX-B is an effective treatment modality for glabellar rhytides refractory or exhibiting decreased clinical effect to BTX-A. The duration of effect using the 2,500 U dosing schedule described herein was shorter than that typically achieved after equivalent BTX-A injection. [source]


Botulinum Toxin Type B (MYOBLOC) Versus Botulinum Toxin Type A (BOTOX) Frontalis Study: Rate of Onset and Radius of Diffusion

DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY, Issue 5 2003
Timothy Corcoran Flynn MD
Background. Botulinum toxin types A and B can improve the appearance of facial wrinkles. Differences in the time until onset and the degree of diffusion have been observed anecdotally, but no direct comparative studies have been done. Objective. To compare the rate of onset and the radius of diffusion of botulinum toxin types A and B in the rhytides of the forehead. Methods. Adults with symmetrical moderate to severe forehead wrinkles at full contracture received botulinum toxin type A (BOTOX; 5 U) on one side of the forehead and type B (MYOBLOC; 500 U) on the other side. Photographs taken at rest and full frontalis contracture were analyzed by computer, and a time-lapse motion picture was created. Radius of diffusion and time until full effect were measured. Results. Botulinum toxin type B had a slightly faster onset of action than type A. All patients responded to type B quickly, whereas some had a delayed response to type A. A greater radius of diffusion was consistently observed with botulinum toxin type B, as measured by the greater area of wrinkle reduction at the doses used. Conclusions. In this comparative study of patients with symmetrical forehead wrinkles, botulinum toxin type B produced a greater area of diffusion and a more rapid onset of action than type A. [source]


(203) Manufacturing Process for a Highly Purified, Stable Liquid Formulation of Botulinum Toxin Type B (MyoblocÔ)

PAIN MEDICINE, Issue 3 2001
Andrew Grethlein
Botulinum toxin type B (BoNT-B; MyoblocÔ) is a new botulinum toxin with demonstrated efficacy in patients with cervical dystonia, and has been found to decrease neck pain associated with this disorder. Developmental work has led to the commercial-scale production of a uniform, highly purified toxin complex in a liquid formulation. Production of BoNT-B involves fermentation, recovery and purification from Clostridium botulinum. The reliability and robustness of the process were tested by altering critical process parameters (eg, pH, temperature) and showing that a high-quality product resulted even in conditions detrimental to C botulinum fermentation. Consistency and key quality attributes (purity, complex integrity, percent nicking, specific activity) of the toxin were assessed using a series of biochemical tests, which were validated as precise and accurate and are now routinely used in quality control analysis. Results confirmed production of an intact, uniform toxin complex with consistent purity, percentage nicking (a measure of toxin activation) of over 70%, and specific activity over 90 U/ng in three manufacturing runs. BoNT-B is manufactured as a slightly acidic liquid formulation that maintains complex integrity, reducing the potential for generating neutralizing antibodies. The potency of drug substance, dilute bulk solution, and finished product was shown to be reliable using the validated mouse intraperitoneal LD50 potency assay. The liquid formulation of BoNT-B was found to be stable for at least 9 months at 25°C and at least 3 years at 2,8°C. BoNT-B has a long shelf-life and may be produced on a commercial scale reliably and reproducibly, making it readily available and convenient to store and use. Support of Elan Pharmaceuticals is gratefully acknowledged. [source]


Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Myobloc (Botulinum Toxin Type B) for the Treatment of Palmar Hyperhidrosis

DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY, Issue 3 2005
Leslie Baumann MD
Background Palmar hyperhidrosis is a problem of unknown etiology that affects patients both socially and professionally. Botulinum toxin type B (Myobloc), approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of cervical dystonia in the United States in December 2000, has subsequently been used effectively in an off-label indication to treat hyperhidrosis. There are sparse data, however, in the literature evaluating the safety and efficacy of BTX-B for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis. Objective We evaluated the safety and efficacy of Myobloc in the treatment of bilateral palmar hyperhidrosis. This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study to report on the safety and efficacy of Myobloc. Methods Twenty participants (10 men, 10 women) diagnosed with palmar hyperhidrosis were injected with either Myobloc (5,000 U per palm) or a 1.0 mL vehicle (100 mM NaCl, 10 mM succinate, and 0.5 mg/mL human albumin) into bilateral palms (15 Myobloc, 5 placebo). The participants were followed until sweating returned to baseline levels. The main outcome measures were safety, efficacy versus placebo, and duration of effect. Results A significant difference was found in treatment response at day 30, as determined by participant assessments, between 15 participants injected with Myobloc and 3 participants injected with placebo. The duration of action, calculated in the 17 participants who received Myobloc injections and completed the study, ranged from 2.3 to 4.9 months, with a mean duration of 3.8 months. The single most reported adverse event was dry mouth or throat, which was reported by 18 of 20 participants. The adverse event profile also included indigestion or heartburn (60%), excessively dry hands (60%), muscle weakness (60%), and decreased grip strength (50%). Conclusion Myobloc proved to be efficacious for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis. Myobloc had a rapid onset, with most participants responding within 1 week. The duration of action ranged from 2.3 to 4.9 months, with a mean of 3.8 months. The adverse event profile included dry mouth, indigestion or heartburn, excessively dry hands, muscle weakness, and decreased grip strength. MYOBLOC WAS PROVIDED FOR THIS STUDY BY ELAN PHARMACEUTICALS. [source]


Botulinum Toxin Type B for Dynamic Glabellar Rhytides Refractory to Botulinum Toxin Type A

DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY, Issue 5 2003
Tina S. Alster MD
Background. Botulinum toxin type B (BTX-B; Myobloc) has recently been introduced for the treatment of dynamic rhytides. This serotype is structurally similar to botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A; Botox) and appears to produce equivalent muscular paralysis. Because of the fact that some patients may become resistant to the effects of BTX-A with its continued use or may require large doses of type A to exert adequate muscular paralysis, the use of BTX-B may prove beneficial in these cases. Objective. To determine the effect of BTX-B on glabellar rhytides refractory or showing decreased clinical effect to treatment with BTX-A. Methods. Twenty females (mean age, 43 years) with vertical glabellar rhytides showing decreased or negligible clinical effect to BTX-A were treated with intramuscular injections of BTX-B. Five standardized intramuscular sites (procerus, inferomedial corrugator muscles, superior middle corrugator muscles) received a total dose of 2,500 U. Patients were evaluated at pretreatment and 48 to 72 hours, 1 week, and 2 and 4 months after injection. Results. All glabellar rhytides improved after treatment with BTX-B injections. Peak clinical effect was noted 1 month after treatment, with 50% of peak effect evident at the 2-month follow-up. Near complete dissolution of effect was seen at 4 months after treatment. Side effects were transient and were limited to moderate injectional pain and rare bruising and frontal brow tightness. Conclusions. BTX-B is an effective treatment modality for glabellar rhytides refractory or exhibiting decreased clinical effect to BTX-A. The duration of effect using the 2,500 U dosing schedule described herein was shorter than that typically achieved after equivalent BTX-A injection. [source]


Botulinum Toxin Type B (MYOBLOC) Versus Botulinum Toxin Type A (BOTOX) Frontalis Study: Rate of Onset and Radius of Diffusion

DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY, Issue 5 2003
Timothy Corcoran Flynn MD
Background. Botulinum toxin types A and B can improve the appearance of facial wrinkles. Differences in the time until onset and the degree of diffusion have been observed anecdotally, but no direct comparative studies have been done. Objective. To compare the rate of onset and the radius of diffusion of botulinum toxin types A and B in the rhytides of the forehead. Methods. Adults with symmetrical moderate to severe forehead wrinkles at full contracture received botulinum toxin type A (BOTOX; 5 U) on one side of the forehead and type B (MYOBLOC; 500 U) on the other side. Photographs taken at rest and full frontalis contracture were analyzed by computer, and a time-lapse motion picture was created. Radius of diffusion and time until full effect were measured. Results. Botulinum toxin type B had a slightly faster onset of action than type A. All patients responded to type B quickly, whereas some had a delayed response to type A. A greater radius of diffusion was consistently observed with botulinum toxin type B, as measured by the greater area of wrinkle reduction at the doses used. Conclusions. In this comparative study of patients with symmetrical forehead wrinkles, botulinum toxin type B produced a greater area of diffusion and a more rapid onset of action than type A. [source]


(203) Manufacturing Process for a Highly Purified, Stable Liquid Formulation of Botulinum Toxin Type B (MyoblocÔ)

PAIN MEDICINE, Issue 3 2001
Andrew Grethlein
Botulinum toxin type B (BoNT-B; MyoblocÔ) is a new botulinum toxin with demonstrated efficacy in patients with cervical dystonia, and has been found to decrease neck pain associated with this disorder. Developmental work has led to the commercial-scale production of a uniform, highly purified toxin complex in a liquid formulation. Production of BoNT-B involves fermentation, recovery and purification from Clostridium botulinum. The reliability and robustness of the process were tested by altering critical process parameters (eg, pH, temperature) and showing that a high-quality product resulted even in conditions detrimental to C botulinum fermentation. Consistency and key quality attributes (purity, complex integrity, percent nicking, specific activity) of the toxin were assessed using a series of biochemical tests, which were validated as precise and accurate and are now routinely used in quality control analysis. Results confirmed production of an intact, uniform toxin complex with consistent purity, percentage nicking (a measure of toxin activation) of over 70%, and specific activity over 90 U/ng in three manufacturing runs. BoNT-B is manufactured as a slightly acidic liquid formulation that maintains complex integrity, reducing the potential for generating neutralizing antibodies. The potency of drug substance, dilute bulk solution, and finished product was shown to be reliable using the validated mouse intraperitoneal LD50 potency assay. The liquid formulation of BoNT-B was found to be stable for at least 9 months at 25°C and at least 3 years at 2,8°C. BoNT-B has a long shelf-life and may be produced on a commercial scale reliably and reproducibly, making it readily available and convenient to store and use. Support of Elan Pharmaceuticals is gratefully acknowledged. [source]


Use of Intraoperative Botulinum Toxin in Facial Reconstruction

DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY, Issue 2 2009
TIMOTHY CORCORAN FLYNN MD
BACKGROUND Botulinum toxin is a potent neuromodulator that temporarily relaxes muscles and can improve wound healing. OBJECTIVE This retrospective analysis assessed the use of intraoperative botulinum toxin type A or B in patients undergoing surgical reconstruction after Mohs micrographic surgery for treatment of skin cancer. The primary effect of intradermal botulinum toxin on wound healing was also studied. METHODS & MATERIALS Charts of patients who received intraoperative botulinum toxin type A (n=9) or B (n=9) in conjunction with reconstructive surgery after Mohs micrographic surgery were reviewed. Three volunteers also underwent dermal injections of botulinum toxin type A followed by erbium laser resurfacing. RESULTS Outcomes did not differ in patients treated with botulinum toxin type A and type B. Patients had excellent apposition of wound edges and smooth skin overlying soft tissue; no significant complications were noted. Healing of erbium laser ablation did not differ between botulinum toxin type A,treated skin and control skin. CONCLUSIONS Administration of botulinum toxin type A or B after reconstruction after Mohs micrographic surgery aided wound healing; botulinum toxin type A and botulinum toxin type B were equally effective. Intradermal botulinum toxin type A demonstrated no primary effect on healing of erbium laser,resurfaced skin. [source]


Botulinum Toxin Type B (MYOBLOC) Versus Botulinum Toxin Type A (BOTOX) Frontalis Study: Rate of Onset and Radius of Diffusion

DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY, Issue 5 2003
Timothy Corcoran Flynn MD
Background. Botulinum toxin types A and B can improve the appearance of facial wrinkles. Differences in the time until onset and the degree of diffusion have been observed anecdotally, but no direct comparative studies have been done. Objective. To compare the rate of onset and the radius of diffusion of botulinum toxin types A and B in the rhytides of the forehead. Methods. Adults with symmetrical moderate to severe forehead wrinkles at full contracture received botulinum toxin type A (BOTOX; 5 U) on one side of the forehead and type B (MYOBLOC; 500 U) on the other side. Photographs taken at rest and full frontalis contracture were analyzed by computer, and a time-lapse motion picture was created. Radius of diffusion and time until full effect were measured. Results. Botulinum toxin type B had a slightly faster onset of action than type A. All patients responded to type B quickly, whereas some had a delayed response to type A. A greater radius of diffusion was consistently observed with botulinum toxin type B, as measured by the greater area of wrinkle reduction at the doses used. Conclusions. In this comparative study of patients with symmetrical forehead wrinkles, botulinum toxin type B produced a greater area of diffusion and a more rapid onset of action than type A. [source]


Complex integrity of botulinum toxin type B (NeuroBlocÔ): implications for the incidence of secondary non-responders

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY, Issue 2001
P. Hirtzer
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Mouse diaphragm assay for detection of antibodies against botulinum toxin type B

MOVEMENT DISORDERS, Issue 12 2005
Dirk Dressler MD
Abstract With the advent of a commercial preparation of botulinum toxin type B (BT-B) for treatment of cervical dystonia detection of antibodies against BT-B (BT-B-AB) becomes necessary. For this purpose, we carried out a mouse diaphragm assay (MDA) by continuous measurement of the twitch force of a mouse hemidiaphragm preparation elicited by electric stimulation of its phrenic nerve. After exposing the preparation to BT-B 3 ng/ml the time to half-maximal twitch force reduction (paralysis time [PT]) was 69 ± 4 min (n = 25). Addition of sera from patients with antibodies against BT-A produced a PT of 68 ± 5 min (n = 24), whereas addition of sera from controls with antibodies against tetanus toxoid produced a PT of 67 ± 6 min (n = 30). When defined amounts of BT-B-AB were added to the MDA, PT was prolonged. This prolongation was correlated closely to the amount of BT-B-AB added, thus producing a calibration curve. The threshold for BT-B-AB detection was 0.4 mU/ml. When sera from 7 patients (4 women, 3 men; age 50.6 ± 14.2 years) with cervical dystonia (Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale score, 18.9 ± 2.9) and complete secondary failure of BT-B therapy (NeuroBloc; Elan Pharmaceuticals, Shannon, Ireland; 12,229 ± 2,601 MU/injection series, 1.86 ± 0.69 injection series before complete secondary therapy failure; 100.4 ± 15.8 days between injection series with normal therapeutic effect) were tested, BT-B-AB titers of more than 10 mU/ml were found in all of them. The MDA can be used to measure neutralizing BT-B-AB titers quantitatively and with adequate sensitivity and specificity. Further studies are necessary to understand the role of intermediate BT-B-AB titers in partial BT-B therapy failure. © 2005 Movement Disorder Society [source]