Bone Walls (bone + wall)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Lateral ridge augmentation by the use of grafts comprised of autologous bone or a biomaterial.

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PERIODONTOLOGY, Issue 12 2002
An experiment in the dog
Abstract Objective: The present investigation was performed to determine if a block of Bio-Oss« used as an onlay graft can be used as a scaffold for new bone formation. Material and methods: Five mongrel dogs were used. The mandibular premolars were extracted. On both sides of the mandible, the buccal bone plate was resected and defects, about 25 mm long, 8 mm high and 5 mm wide, were produced After 3 months of healing, a second surgical procedure was performed. In the left side, a block of Bio-Oss« was adjusted to the buccal bone wall. The graft had the shape of a cylinder and was retained with a miniscrew and covered with a collagen membrane. In the contra-lateral side of the mandible, a block biopsy was first obtained from the ascending ramus. This bone graft had the shape of a cylinder that was 8 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick. The graft was transferred to the experimental site, adjusted to the buccal wall, retained with a miniscrew, and covered with a membrane. The flaps were repositioned and closed with sutures to ensure a complete coverage of the experimental sites. After 6 months of healing, the dogs were sacrificed and the experimental sites dissected. The biopsies were processed for ground sectioning. The sections were stained in toluidine blue, examined in the microscope, and a number of histo- and morphometric assessments made. Results: The study demonstrated that cortical bone used as an onlay graft in the lateral aspect of the alveolar ridge, during a 6-month period of healing integrated with the host bone but underwent marked peripheral resorption. Thus, close to 30% of the height and 50% of the length of the graft was replaced with connective tissue. It was further observed that while the dimensions of a graft which contained a scaffold of cancellous bovine bone mineral remained unchanged, only moderate amounts of new bone formed at the base of this graft. Conclusion: Grafts of autologous cortical bone, placed on the surface of a one-wall defect, may undergo marked resorption during healing. A similar graft of Bio-Oss« may retain its dimension, and limited amounts of new bone will form within the biomaterial. [source]


Modeling of the buccal and lingual bone walls of fresh extraction sites following implant installation

CLINICAL ORAL IMPLANTS RESEARCH, Issue 6 2006
Mauricio G. Ara˙jo
Abstract Objective: To determine whether the reduction of the alveolar ridge that occurs following tooth extraction and implant placement is influenced by the size of the hard tissue walls of the socket. Material and methods: Six beagle dogs were used. The third premolar and first molar in both quadrants of the mandible were used. Mucoperiostal flaps were elevated and the distal roots were removed. Implants were installed in the fresh extraction socket in one side of the mandible. The flaps were replaced to allow a semi-submerged healing. The procedure was repeated in the contra later side of the mandible after 2 months. The animals were sacrificed 1 month after the final implant installation. The mandibles were dissected, and each implant site was removed and processed for ground sectioning. Results: Marked hard tissue alterations occurred during healing following tooth extraction and implant installation in the socket. The marginal gap that was present between the implant and the walls of the socket at implantation disappeared as a result of bone fill and resorption of the bone crest. The modeling in the marginal defect region was accompanied by marked attenuation of the dimensions of both the delicate buccal and the wider lingual bone wall. Bone loss at molar sites was more pronounced than at the premolar locations. Conclusion: Implant placement failed to preserve the hard tissue dimension of the ridge following tooth extraction. The buccal as well as the lingual bone walls were resorbed. At the buccal aspect, this resulted in some marginal loss of osseointegration. [source]


Tissue modeling following implant placement in fresh extraction sockets

CLINICAL ORAL IMPLANTS RESEARCH, Issue 6 2006
Mauricio G. Ara˙jo
Abstract Objective: To study whether osseointegration once established following implant placement in a fresh extraction socket may be lost as a result of tissue modeling. Material and methods: Seven beagle dogs were used. The third and fourth premolars in both quadrants of the mandible were used as experimental teeth. Buccal and lingual full-thickness flaps were elevated and distal roots were removed. Implants were installed in the fresh extraction socket. Semi-submerged healing of the implant sites was allowed. In five dogs, the experimental procedure was first performed in the right side of the mandible and 2 months later in the left mandible. These five animals were sacrificed 1 month after the final implant installation. In two dogs, the premolar sites on both sides of the mandible were treated in one surgical session and biopsies were obtained immediately after implant placement. All biopsies were processed for ground sectioning and stained. Results: The void that existed between the implant and the socket walls at surgery was filled at 4 weeks with woven bone that made contact with the SLA surface. In this interval, (i) the buccal and lingual bone walls underwent marked surface resorption and (ii) the height of the thin buccal hard tissue wall was reduced. The process of healing continued, and the buccal bone crest shifted further in the apical direction. After 12 weeks, the buccal crest was located>2 mm apical of the marginal border of the SLA surface. Conclusion: The bone-to-implant contact that was established during the early phase of socket healing following implant installation was in part lost when the buccal bone wall underwent continued resorption. [source]


A prospective, randomized-controlled clinical trial to evaluate bone preservation using implants with different geometry placed into extraction sockets in the maxilla

CLINICAL ORAL IMPLANTS RESEARCH, Issue 1 2010
Mariano Sanz
Abstract Aim: The primary objective of this study was to determine the association between the size of the void established by using two different implant configurations and the amount of buccal/palatal bone loss that occurred during 16 weeks of healing following their installation into extraction sockets. Material and methods: The clinical trial was designed as a prospective, randomized-controlled parallel-group multicenter study. Adults in need of one or more implants replacing teeth to be removed in the maxilla within the region 15,25 were recruited. Following tooth extraction, the site was randomly allocated to receive either a cylindrical (group A) or a tapered implant (group B). After implant installation, a series of measurements were made to determine the dimension of the ridge and the void between the implant and the extraction socket. These measurements were repeated at the re-entry procedure after 16 weeks. Results: The study demonstrated that the removal of single teeth and the immediate placement of an implant resulted in marked alterations of the dimension of the buccal ridge (43% and 30%) and the horizontal (80,63%) as well as the vertical (69,65%) gap between the implant and the bone walls. Although the dimensional changes were not significantly different between the two-implant configurations, both the horizontal and the vertical gap changes were greater in group A than in group B. Conclusions: Implant placement into extraction sockets will result in significant bone reduction of the alveolar ridge. To cite this article: Sanz M, Cecchinato D, Ferrus J, Pjetursson EB, Lang NP, Jan L. A prospective, randomized-controlled clinical trial to evaluate bone preservation using implants with different geometry placed into extraction sockets in the maxilla. Clin. Oral Impl. Res. 21, 2009; 13,21. [source]


Modeling of the buccal and lingual bone walls of fresh extraction sites following implant installation

CLINICAL ORAL IMPLANTS RESEARCH, Issue 6 2006
Mauricio G. Ara˙jo
Abstract Objective: To determine whether the reduction of the alveolar ridge that occurs following tooth extraction and implant placement is influenced by the size of the hard tissue walls of the socket. Material and methods: Six beagle dogs were used. The third premolar and first molar in both quadrants of the mandible were used. Mucoperiostal flaps were elevated and the distal roots were removed. Implants were installed in the fresh extraction socket in one side of the mandible. The flaps were replaced to allow a semi-submerged healing. The procedure was repeated in the contra later side of the mandible after 2 months. The animals were sacrificed 1 month after the final implant installation. The mandibles were dissected, and each implant site was removed and processed for ground sectioning. Results: Marked hard tissue alterations occurred during healing following tooth extraction and implant installation in the socket. The marginal gap that was present between the implant and the walls of the socket at implantation disappeared as a result of bone fill and resorption of the bone crest. The modeling in the marginal defect region was accompanied by marked attenuation of the dimensions of both the delicate buccal and the wider lingual bone wall. Bone loss at molar sites was more pronounced than at the premolar locations. Conclusion: Implant placement failed to preserve the hard tissue dimension of the ridge following tooth extraction. The buccal as well as the lingual bone walls were resorbed. At the buccal aspect, this resulted in some marginal loss of osseointegration. [source]


Tissue modeling following implant placement in fresh extraction sockets

CLINICAL ORAL IMPLANTS RESEARCH, Issue 6 2006
Mauricio G. Ara˙jo
Abstract Objective: To study whether osseointegration once established following implant placement in a fresh extraction socket may be lost as a result of tissue modeling. Material and methods: Seven beagle dogs were used. The third and fourth premolars in both quadrants of the mandible were used as experimental teeth. Buccal and lingual full-thickness flaps were elevated and distal roots were removed. Implants were installed in the fresh extraction socket. Semi-submerged healing of the implant sites was allowed. In five dogs, the experimental procedure was first performed in the right side of the mandible and 2 months later in the left mandible. These five animals were sacrificed 1 month after the final implant installation. In two dogs, the premolar sites on both sides of the mandible were treated in one surgical session and biopsies were obtained immediately after implant placement. All biopsies were processed for ground sectioning and stained. Results: The void that existed between the implant and the socket walls at surgery was filled at 4 weeks with woven bone that made contact with the SLA surface. In this interval, (i) the buccal and lingual bone walls underwent marked surface resorption and (ii) the height of the thin buccal hard tissue wall was reduced. The process of healing continued, and the buccal bone crest shifted further in the apical direction. After 12 weeks, the buccal crest was located>2 mm apical of the marginal border of the SLA surface. Conclusion: The bone-to-implant contact that was established during the early phase of socket healing following implant installation was in part lost when the buccal bone wall underwent continued resorption. [source]