Bone Scintigraphy (bone + scintigraphy)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Diagnostic and therapeutic use of radioisotopes for bony disease in prostate cancer: Current practice

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF UROLOGY, Issue 2 2007
Nathan Lawrentschuk
Abstract: Nuclear medicine techniques continue to be important non-invasive imaging tools assisting the diagnosis, monitoring and , in some cases , treatment of prostate cancer. Bone scintigraphy was the premier modality to have an extensive role in the staging of prostate cancer and has remained an integral tool for over three decades in the assessment of newly diagnosed disease or in follow-up staging. Therapeutic treatment and palliation of disseminated disease, particularly in the skeleton, has also been successful with several radioisotopes including strontium-89 chloride. Despite advances in nuclear medicine techniques and molecular imaging technology such as positron emission tomography and radioimmunoscintigraphy, bone scintigraphy still remains the gold standard in the assessment of osseous metastatic disease in prostate cancer. Thus, it is important to continually review the modalities that have remained important over time and not just to focus on newer technologies. This article summarizes the current diagnostic and therapeutic use of radioisotopes for bony disease in prostate cancer with particular reference to radionuclide bone scintigraphy and positron emission tomography. [source]


Imaging of the symptomatic type II accessory navicular bone

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, Issue 2 2004
Leigh D Mosel
Summary Accessory ossicles of the foot are commonly mistaken for fractures. The accessory navicular is one of the most common accessory ossicles of the foot. There is a higher incidence in women and the finding might be bilateral in 50,90%. This entity is usually asymptomatic, although populations with medial foot pain have a higher prevalence. Three types of accessory navicular bone have been described. The type II accessory navicular is the most commonly symptomatic variant with localized chronic or acute on chronic medial foot pain and tenderness with associated inflammation of overlying soft tissues. Plain radiographic identification of the accessory navicular is insufficient to attribute symptomatology. Ultrasound allows for comparison with the asymptomatic side and localization of pain. Bone scintigraphy has a high sensitivity but positive findings lack specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging is of high diagnostic value for demonstrating both bone marrow and soft tissue oedema. [source]


Whole-body bone scintigraphy provides a measure of the total-body burden of osteoarthritis for the purpose of systemic biomarker validation

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM, Issue 11 2009
Shelby Addison
Objective To evaluate the association of serum and synovial fluid cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) with systemic and local measures of osteoarthritis (OA) activity by bone scintigraphy. Methods Samples of serum and knee joint synovial fluid (275 knees) were obtained from 159 patients with symptomatic OA of at least 1 knee. Bone scintigraphy using 99mTc-labeled methylene diphosphonate was performed, and early-phase knee scans and late-phase whole-body bone scans of 15 additional joint sites were scored semiquantitatively. To control for within-subject correlations of knee data, generalized linear modeling was used in the correlation of the bone scan scores with the COMP levels. Principal components analysis was used to explore the contribution of each joint site to the variance in serum COMP levels. Results The correlation between synovial fluid and serum COMP levels was significant (r = 0.206, P = 0.006). Synovial fluid COMP levels correlated most strongly with the early-phase knee bone scan scores (P = 0.0003), even after adjustment for OA severity according to the late-phase bone scan scores (P = 0.015), as well as synovial fluid volumes (P < 0.0001). Serum COMP levels correlated with the total-body bone scan scores (r = 0.188, P = 0.018) and with a factor composed of the bone scan scores in the shoulders, spine, lateral knees, and sacroiliac joints (P = 0.0004). Conclusion Synovial fluid COMP levels correlated strongly with 2 indicators of knee joint inflammation: early-phase bone scintigraphic findings and synovial fluid volume. Serum COMP levels correlated with total-body joint disease severity as determined by late-phase bone scintigraphy, supporting the hypothesis that whole-body bone scintigraphy is a means of quantifying the total-body burden of OA for systemic biomarker validation. [source]


Prospective study of bone scintigraphy as a staging investigation for oesophageal carcinoma,

BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY (NOW INCLUDES EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SURGERY), Issue 7 2008
N. A. Jennings
Background: About 10 per cent of patients undergoing radical oesophagectomy for transmural (T3) carcinoma with lymph node involvement (N1) develop symptomatic bone metastases within 12 months of surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the introduction of targeted preoperative bone scintigraphy. Methods: Of 790 patients with oesophageal carcinoma staged between December 2000 and December 2004, 189 were eligible for potentially curative treatment. 99mTc-labelled hydroxymethylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy was performed in those with stage T3 N1 disease (identified by computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasonography) who were suitable for radical treatment. Results: A total of 115 patients had bone scintigraphy. The histological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma in 82 patients and squamous cell carcinoma in 33. Bone scintigraphy was normal or showed degenerative changes in 93 patients, and abnormal requiring further investigation in 22. Plain radiography, magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy confirmed the presence of bone metastases in 11 patients (96 per cent). Conclusion: Bone is frequently the first site of identifiable distant metastatic spread, and bone scintigraphy is recommended to exclude metastatic disease before radical treatment of advanced oesophageal carcinoma. Copyright 2008 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Usefulness of single photon emission computed tomography imaging in the detection of lumbar vertebral metastases from prostate cancer

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF UROLOGY, Issue 6 2008
Tetsuo Nozaki
Objective: To determine whether single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is useful in the detection of prostate cancer bone metastases in the lumbar vertebrae. Methods: Thirty-nine patients (12 with benign prostatic hyperplasia, 27 with prostate cancer) were considered and submitted to bone SPECT. All of them had increased uptake in lumbar vertebrae on bone scintigraphy. In those with prostate cancer, definitive diagnosis of bone metastases was established by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). SPECT axial images were classified into five accumulation patterns: mosaic, large hot, diffuse, peripheral, and articular (or pediculate). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of bone SPECT were calculated. Results: Overall, 116 vertebral lesions (49 metastatic, 67 degenerative) were studied. Mosaic, large hot and diffuse patterns were more frequently associated with metastatic lesions (84.2%, 70.3%, and 63.1% of the cases, respectively). On the other hand, peripheral and articular (or pediculate) patterns were mostly ascribed to degenerative lesions (100% and 87.5% of the cases, respectively). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of bone SPECT were 95.9% (47/49), 73.1% (49/67), 72.3% (47/65), and 96.1% (49/51), respectively. Conclusions: Bone SPECT provides better accuracy than bone scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of lumbar vertebral lesions from prostate cancer. [source]


Diagnostic and therapeutic use of radioisotopes for bony disease in prostate cancer: Current practice

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF UROLOGY, Issue 2 2007
Nathan Lawrentschuk
Abstract: Nuclear medicine techniques continue to be important non-invasive imaging tools assisting the diagnosis, monitoring and , in some cases , treatment of prostate cancer. Bone scintigraphy was the premier modality to have an extensive role in the staging of prostate cancer and has remained an integral tool for over three decades in the assessment of newly diagnosed disease or in follow-up staging. Therapeutic treatment and palliation of disseminated disease, particularly in the skeleton, has also been successful with several radioisotopes including strontium-89 chloride. Despite advances in nuclear medicine techniques and molecular imaging technology such as positron emission tomography and radioimmunoscintigraphy, bone scintigraphy still remains the gold standard in the assessment of osseous metastatic disease in prostate cancer. Thus, it is important to continually review the modalities that have remained important over time and not just to focus on newer technologies. This article summarizes the current diagnostic and therapeutic use of radioisotopes for bony disease in prostate cancer with particular reference to radionuclide bone scintigraphy and positron emission tomography. [source]


Multifocal metastases of recurrent renal cell carcinoma successfully treated with a combination of low dose interleukin-2, ,-interferon and radiotherapy

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF UROLOGY, Issue 11 2005
NORIFUMI SAWADA
Abstract ,A 59-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of left ,ank pain and a possibility of gross hematuria. Left renal cell carcinoma stage II was diagnosed and radical left nephrectomy was performed. Twenty-two months postoperatively, lung metastases were demonstrated and 6 106 units of ,-interferon (IFN-,) were administered for 9 months, only to keep the sizes of the metastases unchanged. Thirty-four months after the operation, liver metastases and bone metastasis in the left sacroiliac joint were revealed. The combination cytokine therapy was performed with 1.4 106 U of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and 3 106 U of IFN-, for 16 weeks, and the left sacroiliac joint metastasis was treated with radiation therapy of 4 Gy per day for 7 days. Six months after the 16 weeks of immunotherapy, computed tomography and bone scintigraphy revealed that the metastases of the lung, liver and bone substantially disappeared and this complete response is still kept after 16 months. [source]


Diagnostic value of serum prostate-specific antigen in hemodialysis patients

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF UROLOGY, Issue 5 2003
MASAHIRO SUMURA
Abstract Background: The value of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening was examined to detect prostate cancer in men receiving hemodialysis. Methods: Forty-one male patients age 60,95 (median age, 70 years) receiving hemodialysis were investigated for PSA levels. We set the cut-off point at 4 ng/mL (the usual reference range). Digital rectal examination (DRE) and transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) of the prostate were performed in patients whose PSA was more than 4 ng/mL and/or who expected further examination of the prostate. When prostate cancer was suspected, biopsy of the prostate was performed. In patients with prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and bone scintigraphy were performed to diagnose the clinical stage. Results: The mean serum level of PSA was 2.10 0.49 ng/mL. In this screening study, four of 41 men required further examinations for prostate cancer. Two of four refused further examinations. The other two were diagnosed with prostate cancer. The incidence of prostate cancer was at least 5% in our hemodialysis patients. One man, whose clinical stage was T2aN0M0, was treated with radical retropubic prostatectomy. Another man, whose clinical stage was T2bN0M0, was treated with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue. Conclusion: In our preliminary study, prostate cancer screening with PSA was useful for the early detection of prostate cancer in hemodialysis patients. If possible, DRE and TRUS should be performed in conjunction with PSA tests. [source]


Prostate mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cell

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF UROLOGY, Issue 4 2003
EYUP GUMUS
Abstract Prostate mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cell is a rare neoplasm with only 11 cases reported to date. We present the 12th case of prostate mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cell. The case was detected incidentally as a result of a biopsy taken from a lesion in the prostatic urethra during a urethrocystoscopy of a 47-year-old male patient who underwent an internal urethrotomy operation due to urethrostenosis. Endoscopic examination showed a loose, spongy, gray,white structure covering the prostatic urethra, especially the right lobe of the prostate. The diagnosis resulting from the pathological examination of the biopsy was prostate mucinous adenocarcinoma with signet ring cell. A total of 50 Gy radiotherapy was applied to the patient. In the 27th month of follow-up after treatment, thoracoabdominal computed tomography, bone scintigraphy, and tumor markers (PSA, CEA and CA19-9) were found to be normal. [source]


SAPHO syndrome masquerading as metastatic bone disease

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, Issue 5 2005
NH Theumann
Summary A 46-year-old woman who had had a right mastectomy for breast carcinoma a month before underwent bone scintigraphy. The examination revealed multiple pelvic, vertebral and sternal hot spots suggestive of bone metastases. Standard X-rays and CT confirmed the presence of bony lesions but they were not typical of bone metastases. As the radiographic appearance was reminiscent of SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis), bone biopsies were performed. Histology showed fibrosis and hyperostosis but no tumour cells. On further questioning, the patient revealed she had had palmar pustulosis and sacroiliitis some years earlier. The purpose of the case report is to show that accurate diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome requires careful clinical and radiological examinations. [source]


Mucinous adenocarcinoma of the temporal region initially diagnosed as temporomandibular disorders: a case report

JOURNAL OF ORAL PATHOLOGY & MEDICINE, Issue 9 2006
Kousuke Honda
Adenocarcinoma occurring in the temporal region has not previously been reported. We present a case of mucinous adenocarcinoma of the temporal region. A 62-year-old female patient was diagnosed as having temporomandibular disorders because of severe trismus and joint pain. Although trismus progressively worsened, there were no abnormal findings on diagnostic imaging studies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bone scintigraphy. As swelling of the temporal region was observed, biopsy was performed. Histologic examination showed chronic inflammation of the striated muscle. Approximately 6 months later, follow-up MRI demonstrated an ill-defined mass lesion in the infratemporal region extending to the intracranium. Histologic diagnosis of the biopsy showed that this mass lesion was moderately differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma. [source]


Whole-body bone scintigraphy provides a measure of the total-body burden of osteoarthritis for the purpose of systemic biomarker validation

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM, Issue 11 2009
Shelby Addison
Objective To evaluate the association of serum and synovial fluid cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) with systemic and local measures of osteoarthritis (OA) activity by bone scintigraphy. Methods Samples of serum and knee joint synovial fluid (275 knees) were obtained from 159 patients with symptomatic OA of at least 1 knee. Bone scintigraphy using 99mTc-labeled methylene diphosphonate was performed, and early-phase knee scans and late-phase whole-body bone scans of 15 additional joint sites were scored semiquantitatively. To control for within-subject correlations of knee data, generalized linear modeling was used in the correlation of the bone scan scores with the COMP levels. Principal components analysis was used to explore the contribution of each joint site to the variance in serum COMP levels. Results The correlation between synovial fluid and serum COMP levels was significant (r = 0.206, P = 0.006). Synovial fluid COMP levels correlated most strongly with the early-phase knee bone scan scores (P = 0.0003), even after adjustment for OA severity according to the late-phase bone scan scores (P = 0.015), as well as synovial fluid volumes (P < 0.0001). Serum COMP levels correlated with the total-body bone scan scores (r = 0.188, P = 0.018) and with a factor composed of the bone scan scores in the shoulders, spine, lateral knees, and sacroiliac joints (P = 0.0004). Conclusion Synovial fluid COMP levels correlated strongly with 2 indicators of knee joint inflammation: early-phase bone scintigraphic findings and synovial fluid volume. Serum COMP levels correlated with total-body joint disease severity as determined by late-phase bone scintigraphy, supporting the hypothesis that whole-body bone scintigraphy is a means of quantifying the total-body burden of OA for systemic biomarker validation. [source]


Radionuclide bone scintigraphy in patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy: when is it indicated?

BJU INTERNATIONAL, Issue 1 2005
Ramesh Thurairaja
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography studies in the diagnosis and staging of clinically advanced prostate cancer

BJU INTERNATIONAL, Issue 1 2003
J. Sung
OBJECTIVE To determine the value of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) studies in evaluating patients with advanced prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS FDG-PET scans were taken in 30 patients with advanced prostate cancer 1 h after an injection with 555 MBq of FDG. Patients were scanned from the base of the skull to the inguinal region (including the pelvis). They were also assessed by computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis, and bone scintigraphy, to evaluate them for metastases. RESULTS Thirteen patients had locally extensive prostate cancer and 17 had metastatic disease. Twenty of the 30 patients were positive for radioisotope uptake in the prostate or extraprostatically. The patients with PET-detected prostate cancer were untreated (seven), treated hormonally while they had rising PSA levels (eight), or treated hormonally with a detectable but stable PSA (five). The remaining 10 patients were negative for FDG uptake in the prostate or any metastatic sites; these 10 patients were receiving hormone therapy, with undetectable PSA levels. CONCLUSION FDG-PET imaging is not a useful test in evaluating advanced prostate cancer in patients being treated and who have an undetectable PSA level. Staging of advanced prostate cancer may be enhanced by FDG-PET imaging in patients who are untreated, who have had an incomplete response to therapy, or who have a rising PSA level despite treatment. [source]


Prospective study of bone scintigraphy as a staging investigation for oesophageal carcinoma,

BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY (NOW INCLUDES EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SURGERY), Issue 7 2008
N. A. Jennings
Background: About 10 per cent of patients undergoing radical oesophagectomy for transmural (T3) carcinoma with lymph node involvement (N1) develop symptomatic bone metastases within 12 months of surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the introduction of targeted preoperative bone scintigraphy. Methods: Of 790 patients with oesophageal carcinoma staged between December 2000 and December 2004, 189 were eligible for potentially curative treatment. 99mTc-labelled hydroxymethylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy was performed in those with stage T3 N1 disease (identified by computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasonography) who were suitable for radical treatment. Results: A total of 115 patients had bone scintigraphy. The histological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma in 82 patients and squamous cell carcinoma in 33. Bone scintigraphy was normal or showed degenerative changes in 93 patients, and abnormal requiring further investigation in 22. Plain radiography, magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy confirmed the presence of bone metastases in 11 patients (96 per cent). Conclusion: Bone is frequently the first site of identifiable distant metastatic spread, and bone scintigraphy is recommended to exclude metastatic disease before radical treatment of advanced oesophageal carcinoma. Copyright 2008 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Incidence and clinical characteristics of symptomatic choroidal metastasis from lung cancer

ACTA OPHTHALMOLOGICA, Issue 5 2008
Klaus-Martin Kreusel
Abstract. Purpose:, To determine the clinical characteristics of symptomatic choroidal metastasis (CM) resulting from metastatic lung cancer. Methods:, Twenty-two consecutive patients with symptomatic CM resulting from lung cancer were retrospectively reviewed for ocular findings, medical history and systemic disease. All patients underwent a complete screening for further organ metastasis by computed tomography (CT) and bone scintigraphy. Annual frequency of CM was determined and compared with the incidence predicted from ocular screening studies. Results:, In eight of 22 (36%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 17,59) patients, lung cancer had been diagnosed before occurrence of CM, with a median interval of 13 months. In 14 patients lung cancer was detected after diagnosis of CM, with a median interval of 1 month. Choroidal metastasis was unilateral, solitary and located close to or at the posterior pole in the majority of patients. Further organ metastasis with a median number of three affected organ systems was present in 19 (86%; 95% CI 65,97) patients. Median survival after diagnosis of symptomatic CM was 13 months, by contrast with 2 months in lung cancer patients with CM identified in an ocular screening study. The mean number of patients in Berlin diagnosed with symptomatic CM was 1.4 per year, which was two orders of magnitude less than predicted from screening studies. Conclusions:, Symptomatic choroidal lung cancer metastasis in the majority of patients presents as a solitary tumour before diagnosis of lung cancer in patients with multiple organ systems affected by metastatic disease. Contrary to predictions from ocular screening studies, it is a rare clinical entity. [source]