Body

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Medical Sciences

Kinds of Body

  • accounting body
  • animal body
  • apoptotic body
  • basal body
  • broad body
  • carotid body
  • cell body
  • cellular body
  • ceramic body
  • ciliary body
  • considerable body
  • cortical lewy body
  • current body
  • dead body
  • deeper body
  • dense body
  • different body
  • diverse body
  • elastic body
  • electron-dense body
  • elementary body
  • embryoid body
  • emerging body
  • entire body
  • extensive body
  • external body
  • fat body
  • female body
  • first polar body
  • fish body
  • flexible body
  • foreign body
  • freshwater body
  • fruit body
  • fruiting body
  • funding body
  • gastric body
  • geniculate body
  • governing body
  • government body
  • governmental body
  • granular body
  • green body
  • growing body
  • host body
  • human body
  • impressive body
  • inclusion body
  • increasing body
  • individual body
  • inhaled foreign body
  • intraocular foreign body
  • intrusive body
  • ketone body
  • kg body
  • lamellar body
  • large body
  • large water body
  • larger body
  • lewy body
  • limited body
  • lipid body
  • lived body
  • lower body
  • main body
  • mallory body
  • mean body
  • moving body
  • multivesicular body
  • mushroom body
  • nation body
  • nerve cell body
  • neuronal cell body
  • nuclear body
  • oil body
  • one body
  • ore body
  • other body
  • own body
  • palade body
  • parent body
  • patient body
  • physical body
  • pick body
  • planetary body
  • plant body
  • polar body
  • pole body
  • processing body
  • professional body
  • protein body
  • psammoma body
  • regulatory body
  • residual body
  • retained intraocular foreign body
  • rigid body
  • rotating body
  • sand body
  • sandstone body
  • second polar body
  • serpentinite body
  • significant body
  • slender body
  • small body
  • small water body
  • social body
  • solid body
  • spindle pole body
  • statutory body
  • student body
  • substantial body
  • surface water body
  • test body
  • total body
  • trapezoid body
  • upper body
  • vast body
  • vertebral body
  • vitreous body
  • water body
  • whole body
  • women body

  • Terms modified by Body

  • body adiposity
  • body area
  • body aspiration
  • body bmd
  • body cavity
  • body cell
  • body center
  • body chamber
  • body change
  • body circumference
  • body clearance
  • body coil
  • body color
  • body coloration
  • body colour
  • body compartment
  • body component
  • body composition
  • body composition change
  • body composition measurement
  • body composition study
  • body concentration
  • body condition
  • body condition index
  • body condition score
  • body conformation
  • body control
  • body day
  • body depth
  • body development
  • body dimension
  • body disease
  • body dissatisfaction
  • body dxa
  • body dysmorphic disorder
  • body experience
  • body exposure
  • body fat
  • body fat content
  • body fat distribution
  • body fat mass
  • body fat percent
  • body fat percentage
  • body fat weight
  • body fatness
  • body fluid
  • body force
  • body form
  • body formation
  • body fossil
  • body function
  • body granuloma
  • body growth
  • body hair
  • body height
  • body image
  • body image concern
  • body image dissatisfaction
  • body image distortion
  • body image disturbance
  • body image scale
  • body insulin sensitivity
  • body involvement
  • body iron store
  • body irradiation
  • body language
  • body length
  • body lipid
  • body lipid content
  • body locations
  • body louse
  • body mass
  • body mass change
  • body mass index
  • body mass index standard deviation score
  • body mass index value
  • body measurement
  • body mode
  • body model
  • body modification
  • body morphology
  • body motion
  • body movement
  • body mucosa
  • body myositi
  • body negative pressure
  • body organ
  • body outline
  • body pain
  • body part
  • body pathology
  • body perception
  • body plan
  • body position
  • body posture
  • body problem
  • body proportion
  • body protein
  • body reaction
  • body region
  • body regions
  • body removal
  • body reserve
  • body satisfaction
  • body scanning
  • body segment
  • body shape
  • body shape change
  • body side
  • body simulation
  • body site
  • body size
  • body size alone
  • body size class
  • body size difference
  • body size distribution
  • body size evolution
  • body size increase
  • body size measurement
  • body size pattern
  • body size variation
  • body sodium
  • body strength
  • body structure
  • body surface
  • body surface area
  • body system
  • body temperature
  • body tissue
  • body tumour
  • body type
  • body vibration
  • body volume
  • body wall
  • body water
  • body weight
  • body weight change
  • body weight daily
  • body weight gain
  • body weight increase
  • body weight loss
  • body weight ratio
  • body weight reduction
  • body weight regulation
  • body weight status
  • body wt
  • body wt.

  • Selected Abstracts


    INFLUENCE OF SAMPLE SIZE AND SHAPE ON TRANSPORT PARAMETERS DURING DRYING OF SHRINKING BODIES

    JOURNAL OF FOOD PROCESS ENGINEERING, Issue 2 2007
    NAJMUR RAHMAN
    ABSTRACT An experimental investigation on the influence of sample size and shape on heat and mass transport parameters under natural convection air-drying is presented. Potato cylinders with length of 0.05 m and thicknesses of 0.005, 0.008, 0.010 and 0.016 m, and circular slices with diameter of 0.05 m and thickness of 0.01 m were dried in a laboratory scale hot-air cabinet dryer. Results indicate that each transport parameter exhibits a linear relationship with sample thickness. Convective heat and mass transfer coefficients (hcand hm) decreased whereas moisture diffusion coefficient (Deff) increased with increasing thickness. Considering no sample shrinkage effect in the parameter analysis, for the thickness range considered, the values of hcare found to be underestimated in the range of 29.0,30.6%, whereas those of hmand Deff are overestimated in the range of 33.7,38.0% and 75.9,128.1%, respectively. Using Levenberg,Marquardt algorithm for optimization, a correlation for Biot number for mass transfer (Bim) as a function of drying time and sample thickness is proposed. A close agreement was observed between dimensionless moisture contents predicted by this relation and those obtained from experiments for different sample thicknesses at drying air temperature of 60C. For the same thickness and drying conditions, circular slices caused an increase in each transport parameter significantly. [source]


    DREAM BODIES AND PERIPATETIC PRAYER: READING BONAVENTURE's ITINERARIUM WITH CERTEAU

    MODERN THEOLOGY, Issue 3 2005
    TIMOTHY J. JOHNSON
    The erstwhile sedentary Parisian theologian, Bonaventure of Bagnoregio, traveled extensively throughout Europe after his election as Minister General of the Minorite Order in 1257. In the fall of 1259 he arrived on Mount La Verna in Tuscany. As he ruminated on the stigmatized flesh of Francis of Assisi, Bonaventure composed the classical mystical text, Itinerarium mentis in Deum. Utilizing Michel de Certeau's work on prayer, travel narratives and spatial practices, this essay explores how Bonaventure rereads the story of the Poverello in the Itinerarium mentis in Deum as a mystic narrative of peripatetic prayer. [source]


    CHRONICALLY UNSTABLE BODIES: REFLECTIONS ON AMAZONIAN CORPORALITIES

    THE JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, Issue 3 2005
    Aparecida Vilaša
    Based on ethnographic material relating to the Wari' (Rond˘nia, Brazil), this article questions some of the presuppositions concerning native conceptions of the body present in contemporary anthropological literature by exploring a central dimension of Amazonian corporality , one that has been little explored in ethnographic works on the region , its unstable and transformational character. This dimension only becomes evident when our analysis presumes an expanded notion of humanity , first called to our attention by authors such as LÚvy-Bruhl and Leenhardt , that includes not only those beings we think of as humans, but also other subjectivities such as animals and spirits. Central to the problem's development is a discussion of the relations between body and soul, humanity and corporality. [source]


    Front and Back Covers, Volume 26, Number 5.

    ANTHROPOLOGY TODAY, Issue 5 2010
    October 2010
    Front and back cover caption, volume 26 issue 5 Front cover RETHINKING SUICIDE BOMBING The body is a key focus for anthropological research and analysis. The cover photographs highlight the way multiple aspects of life, including political life, are mapped onto the body, and the emergence of a collective, as well as individual, identity through these experiences. The front cover shows a young Palestinian boy staring at an Israeli guard's gun, inches from his face, while waiting at the Abu Dis checkpoint in East Jerusalem. Although the scene is calm, the photograph captures an implicit violence (any step out of line can and will be punished) and reveals the daily reality of political and structural violence in the lives of Palestinians. In this image, the child can be seen as an individual who may experience personal trauma as a result of these daily encounters with violence. But he can also be seen as representing a collective Palestinian body which, under the occupation, is humiliated and forced into a childlike position, with daily decisions, including over movement, entirely in the control of Israeli forces. In her article in this issue, Natalia Linos calls on anthropology to offer a critical analysis of suicide bombing and examine the central role of the body in this act. She posits that in a context of political and structural violence that encroaches on both individual and group identity, suicide attacks may be considered an extreme form of reclaiming the violated body through self-directed violence. Through suicide attacks in public spaces, the body may be used to contest physical barriers imposed by an oppressor, resist power imbalances, and reclaim authority over one's body as well as geographical space. Back cover ASSEMBLING BODIES The back cover shows a South African ,body map', on display at the University of Cambridge Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (MAA) until 6 November 2010 as part of the exhibition ,Assembling bodies: Art, science and imagination', reviewed in this issue. This self-portrait by Babalwa depicts her life as an activist and epitomizes the ethical and political negotiations that surround definition and treatment of particular bodies in contemporary South Africa. Babalwa was a member of the Treatment Action Campaign (TAC), which successfully campaigned for the widespread availability of antiretroviral treatment therapies. Her self-portrait is one of a series of life-sized body maps made by members of the Bambanani Womens Group in 2003, as part of a project documenting the lives of women with HIV/AIDS. The body maps and associated narratives trace the co-existence of multiple ways of understanding and experiencing bodies and disease in these women's lives. The imagery , referring to family and friends, political life, biomedical science, anatomical details, moral pollution and religious beliefs , suggests many bodies existing within a single corporeal form. In addition to revealing individual subjectivities, the body maps also highlight the shifting dynamics of sociality. Behind each self-portrait is the outline of another shadowy form, a reminder of the help received and the potential for future support. [source]


    Magnetic ghosts: mineral magnetic measurements on Roman and Anglo-Saxon graves,,

    ARCHAEOLOGICAL PROSPECTION, Issue 3 2004
    N. T. Linford
    Abstract The location of inhumations, in the absence of ferrous grave goods, often presents a considerable challenge to archaeological geophysics, given the small size of the features and the slight physical contrast between the fill of the grave and the surrounding subsoil. Even during excavation, the identification of graves may be complicated where site conditions do not favour the preservation of human skeletal remains and only a subtle soil stain is likely to survive. A recent initiative in the UK has seen the formation of the Buried Organic-matter,Decomposition Integrated with Elemental Status (BODIES) research group, to examine the decomposition of organic artefacts in ancient graves with respect to localized changes in pH, redox potential and nutrient status. This paper presents initial results from a limited mineral magnetic study of two grave sites in an attempt to ascertain whether the decomposition of organic remains may lead to a detectable magnetic signature within the soil. Results from a series of isothermal, hysteresis and magneto-thermal experiments will be presented together with surface magnetometer and topsoil susceptibility surveys. Copyright ę Crown Copyright 2004. Recorded with the permission of Her Majesty's Stationery Office. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    CONTESTED BODIES by Satish Padiyar

    ART HISTORY, Issue 1 2009
    Brendan Prendeville
    First page of article [source]


    PSEUDO-OBSTRUCTION DUE TO FOREIGN BODY: IMPORTANCE OF GOOD PHYSICAL EXAMINATION

    JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 5 2008
    Umesh Tamhane MD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    KNOWING THROUGH THE BODY: THE DAODEJING AND DEWEY

    JOURNAL OF CHINESE PHILOSOPHY, Issue 1 2009
    JOEL W. KRUEGER
    [source]


    PAUL RICOEUR AT THE FOOT OF THE CROSS: NARRATIVE IDENTITY AND THE RESURRECTION OF THE BODY

    MODERN THEOLOGY, Issue 4 2009
    MICHAEL W. DeLASHMUTT
    This article attempts to reconcile the holistically understood and embodied philosophical anthropology indicated by Paul Ricoeur's concept of "narrative identity" with Christian personal eschatology, as realized in the bodily resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth. Narrative identity resonates with spiritual autobiography in the Christian tradition,evinced here by a brief comparison with the confessed self of St Augustine of Hippo,and offers to theology a means of explaining identity in a way which: 1) places care for the other firmly within the construction of one's sense of self; 2) accounts for radical change over time and 3) hints at the possibility of the in-breaking of the infinite into the finite. In this article I will contend that narrative identity provides theology with an exemplary means of framing selfhood which is ultimately congruent with the orthodox Christian belief in the resurrection of the body. [source]


    WHAT KIND OF PHILOSOPHER WAS LOCKE ON MIND AND BODY?

    PACIFIC PHILOSOPHICAL QUARTERLY, Issue 2 2010
    HAN-KYUL KIM
    The wide range of conflicting interpretations that exist in regard to Locke's philosophy of mind and body (i.e. dualistic, materialist, idealistic) can be explained by the general failure of commentators to appreciate the full extent of his nominalism. Although his nominalism that focuses on specific natural kinds has been much discussed, his mind-body nominalism remains largely neglected. This neglect, I shall argue, has given rise to the current diversity of interpretations. This paper offers a solution to this interpretative puzzle, and it attributes a view to Locke that I shall describe as nominal symmetry. [source]


    CATHECTING BODY AND MIND IN A NEW RELATIONSHIP: ASPECTS OF THE ANALYTIC METHOD IN WORK WITH ADOLESCENTS

    THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHOANALYSIS, Issue 3 2002
    Bj÷rn Salomonsson
    First page of article [source]


    INCORPORATING INCEST: GAMETE, BODY AND RELATION IN ASSISTED CONCEPTION,

    THE JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, Issue 4 2004
    Jeanette Edwards
    This article is about the ways in which residents of an English town explore ever-changing possibilities presented by new reproductive technologies (NRTs). It focuses on the way in which the idiom of incest emerges as a conceptual brake to certain possibilities presented by biotechnological intervention in conception. In this specific ethnographic example, we see that the meaning of incest is neither fixed nor predictable and goes beyond ideas about either biogenetic connection or appropriate and inappropriate sexual relations, even while embracing them. I argue that we need to pay attention to the bodies in which procreative substances that ought not to be mixed are combined and grown into new persons. The article also shows that exploration of NRTs continues to be animated by problematics of kinship. [source]


    Front and Back Covers, Volume 21, Number 5.

    ANTHROPOLOGY TODAY, Issue 5 2005
    October 200
    Front and back cover caption, volume 21 issue 5 Front cover Children in the favela (squatter community) of 'Caxambu', in the northern zone of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Although favelas are often depicted as dangerous and as the housing option of last resort, they are also characterized by dense and multi-stranded social ties between residents, long histories of occupation and settlement, and multi-generational families. Caxambu (a pseudonym) was originally settled at the beginning of the 20th century, and residents often describe the neighbourhood as a 'big family'. As the photo makes clear, the alleys, street corners and other public spaces in the favela often serve as giant playgrounds for local children. Back cover THE HUMAN BODY The photo on the back cover shows one of the exhibits from Gunther von Hagens' anatomical exhibition Body Worlds, discussed by Uli Linke in this issue. The exhibits in this show are fashioned from human corpses. The male figure shown here, the body of a man holding and gazing at his own skin, attempts to convey something about the human skin. The anatomical museum markets corpses, artfully transformed to appeal to the viewer. Body Worlds has toured internationally, and attracted millions of visitors. Dead bodies are transformed into sensually appealing 'works of art', playing to fantasies of the alluring body common to the dream worlds promoted by multinational media and entertainment industries. In the exhibition anatomy and pedagogy, economy and medical science, pathology and human rights are closely intertwined. But where do the bodies come from? The corpses, contrary to the exhibitor's claims, are not supplied by German donors - they are procured from Eastern Europe, Russia, Kyrgyzstan and China, from places where human rights and bioethical standards are not enforced. Von Hagens insists that bodies displayed are from donors, and his exhibition website (www.bodyworlds.com) welcomes donations to its body donation programme. In his body factory in Dalian, China, thousands of corpses, including the remains of executed prisoners, are flayed and prepared for later use. This trade in bodies, a multi-million-dollar enterprise, is highly problematic. For the trumpeted 'art of anatomy', with its beautified corpses and eroticized installations, also has a violent dimension, with human victims whose bodies are bought and sold for profit. In November 2002, Gunther von Hagens risked prosecution by holding the first public dissection of a (donated) body in the UK since the 1830s, in London's Atlantis Gallery. The issues surrounding procurement, preparation, dissection and display of human remains are central to anthropology, and in this article Uli Linke discusses in particular the various ways in which this exhbition was interpreted in Germany. [source]


    LEIBNIZ ON BODY, MATTER AND EXTENSION

    ARISTOTELIAN SOCIETY SUPPLEMENTARY VOLUME, Issue 1 2004
    Daniel Garber
    This paper explores Leibniz's conception of body and extension in the 1680s and 1690s. It is argued that one of Leibniz's central aims is to undermine the Cartesian conception of extended substance, and replace it with a conception on which what is basic to body is force. In this way, Leibniz intends to reduce extension to something metaphysically more basic in just the way that the mechanists reduce sensible qualities to size, shape and motion. It is also argued that this move is quite distinct from the reduction of body to monads and their appetitions and perceptions, so prominent in his later writings. [source]


    THE IMMACULATE BODY IN THE SISTINE CEILING

    ART HISTORY, Issue 2 2009
    KIM E. BUTLER
    A new reading of textual evidence roots the imagery of Michelangelo's Sistine Ceiling frescoes in contemporary theological commitment to the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception. The cluster of abstract metaphors contained in a sermon written by Pope Sixtus IV, dedicated to the Immaculate Conception, and the liturgical and devotional texts the sermon inspired, offers foundational source material for the ceiling programme. It is proposed that such an Immaculacy message exists alongside and mutually supports Incarnationist and Eucharistic ones, all rooted in a metaphor of bodily perfection that Michelangelo ,figures' at the level of gender as well. [source]


    THE BODY SPEAKS: BION'S PROTOMENTAL SYSTEM AT WORK1

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOTHERAPY, Issue 4 2009
    Richard Morgan-Jones
    abstract Psychoanalysis has primarily explored somatic experience in relation to love and intimacy. This paper focuses on the body in relation to work. It explores the experience that what patients increasingly present for analysis are the traumas and pleasures of being caught up with and belonging to a body larger than their own, whether in a couple, a group, a work organization or the body politic. It begins with an exploration of Bion's idea of a relationship between protomentality and group disease. It goes on to consider what can be conceived of as his ecological methodology, which enables movement between different ,fields of study' (Bion 1962). These are applied to the health risks encountered by psychotherapists and the profession as a whole. Finally, there is a proposal for mentoring to address professional health, as an under-developed element in the profession. [source]


    WE WERE DANCING IN THE CLUB, NOT ON THE BERLIN WALL: Black Bodies, Street Bureaucrats, and Exclusionary Incorporation into the New Europe

    CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 4 2008
    DAMANI JAMES PARTRIDGE
    ABSTRACT In this essay, I explore the micropolitics of citizenship and sovereignty via the emerging street bureaucratic status of "white" German women in relationships with "black" men in Germany and Berlin. In the midst of the fallen Berlin Wall and increasing Europe-wide restrictions on immigration and asylum, it examines further the extent to which a consistent "black" male hypersexual performance is necessary for legal recognition via "white" German women who, taking on an informal bureaucratic status, ultimately decide which "black" subjects to marry. A history of desiring "black" bodies, the essay argues, coincides with several important moments of sexual liberation (incl. post,World War II African American military occupation, 1970s West German feminism, and the fall of the Berlin Wall), which make these relationships both possible and public; however, the hypersexualized conditions under which "black" subjects get incorporated into contemporary German life are also ultimately exclusionary. [source]


    Phantom Limbs and Invisible Hands: Bodies, Prosthetics, and Late Capitalist Identifications

    CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 3 2001
    Diane M. Nelson
    [source]


    Book Review: Bodies in Society: Essays on Christianity in Contemporary Culture,by Margaret R. Miles

    DIALOG, Issue 3 2010
    Paul O. Myhre
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Assisted Suicide: Do We Own Our Bodies?

    DIALOG, Issue 2 2004
    Jarmo Tarkki
    Abstract:, The ethics of physician-assisted suicide is explored here in light of classic philosophical discussions of the ownership of one's body plus biblical discussions of the relationship of body and soul. Motives for individual and group suicide are brought to bear on bioethical principles such as that of autonomy. Ethical analysis is here challenged by the case of a 91 year-old woman, Ragnhild, who lived after professional judgments that her life should be ended. [source]


    Integration of Different Data Bodies for Humanitarian Decision Support: An Example from Mine Action

    DISASTERS, Issue 4 2003
    Aldo A. Benini
    Geographic information systems (GIS) are increasingly used for integrating data from different sources and substantive areas, including in humanitarian action. The challenges of integration are particularly well illustrated by humanitarian mine action. The informational requirements of mine action are expensive, with socio,economic impact surveys costing over US$1.5 million per country, and are feeding a continuous debate on the merits of considering more factors or ,keeping it simple'. National census offices could, in theory, contribute relevant data, but in practice surveys have rarely overcome institutional obstacles to external data acquisition. A positive exception occurred in Lebanon, where the landmine impact survey had access to agricultural census data. The challenges, costs and benefits of this data integration exercise are analysed in a detailed case study. The benefits are considerable, but so are the costs, particularly the hidden ones. The Lebanon experience prompts some wider reflections. In the humanitarian community, data integration has been fostered not only by the diffusion of GIS technology, but also by institutional changes such as the creation of UN-led Humanitarian Information Centres. There is a question whether the analytic capacity is in step with aggressive data acquisition. Humanitarian action may yet have to build the kind of strong analytic tradition that public health and poverty alleviation have accomplished. [source]


    Missing Bodies, Absent Bards: Spenser, Shakespeare and a Crisis in Criticism

    ENGLISH LITERARY RENAISSANCE, Issue 3 2006
    PATRICIA PALMER
    First page of article [source]


    Sarcodonins and Sarcoviolins, Bioactive Polyhydroxy- p -terphenyl Pyrazinediol Dioxide Conjugates from Fruiting Bodies of the Basidiomycete Sarcodon leucopus

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, Issue 3 2004
    Valeria Calý
    Abstract Six new polyhydroxy- p -terphenyl pyrazinediol dioxide conjugates (4,9) related to sarcodonin (3) have been isolated from the EtOAc extract of the fruiting bodies of the basidiomycete Sarcodon leucopus and we established their structures by spectral analysis and chemical conversions. Three of them, named sarcodonins , (4), , (5), and , (6), afforded the same peracetate 12 upon acetylation. Compounds 7, 8, and 9 gave peracetate 13 and were characterized as the N -oxide epimers of 3,5, respectively, and are named, accordingly, episarcodonin, episarcodonin ,, and episarcodonin ,. From the EtOH extract, we obtained a mixture of two violet pigments. Chemical and spectroscopic data allowed their structures to be established as the p -terphenyl ortho -quinones related to the sarcodonins, namely sarcoviolin , (10) and episarcoviolin , (11). Compounds 3, 4, 6, and 7 and the mixture of 10 and 11 were found to be active in assays against tumor cell cultures. (ę Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, 69451 Weinheim, Germany, 2004) [source]


    Rethinking Law and Violence: The Domestic Violence (Prevention) Bill in India, 2002

    GENDER & HISTORY, Issue 3 2004
    Rajeswari Sunder Rajan
    This essay focuses on the controversy generated by recent proposed legislation on domestic violence in India. An alternative draft bill on domestic violence prepared by the feminist legal NGO, the Lawyers' Collective, and supported by women's groups nationally, includes a demand that victims of domestic violence (usually wives) be permitted by law to continue to occupy the domestic home, a demand that the Government bill has refused to include. This demand is theoretically informed by a politics of space. Bodies and space are linked, to the extent that each is an abstraction without the concept of the other to ground it. The feminist legal proposal challenges property-as-absolute-(male) ownership by conceptualising the household as, instead, shared domestic space. The proposal does not dissimulate common sense , it is conscious of being radical, in part at least because it demystifies the ,domestic' as an ideological construct and offers it instead realistically and minimally as simply an alternative to destitution. The recognition that there are no support structures for dependant women outside the family (such as, for example, state-sponsored welfare institutions), so that destitution can be both sudden and real for women of any class and circumstances, has led to the conceptualisation of a law that formulates a right to shared space as one that makes no claim to shared ownership , while at the same time questioning the other's absolute property right. Despite the limited nature of the claim it makes, this proposal has been viewed as threatening by Indian law-makers. [source]


    Paxillamide: a Novel Phytosphingosine Derivative from the Fruiting Bodies of Paxillus panuoides

    HELVETICA CHIMICA ACTA, Issue 6 2004
    Jin-Ming Gao
    The new phytosphingosine-type ceramide 1, named paxillamide (=2,3-dihydroxy- N -[(1S,2S,3R)-2,3-dihydroxy-1-(hydroxymethyl)heptadecyl]tetracosanamide), was isolated from the CHCl3/MeOH extract of the fruiting bodies of the Basidiomycete Paxillus panuoides, and its structure was elucidated by spectroscopic and chemical methods. [source]


    Interpreting the Process of Change in Higher Education: The Case of the Research Assessment Exercises

    HIGHER EDUCATION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2003
    Ted Tapper
    Given that the current Research Assessment Exercise (RAE 2001) has been completed, it is an appropriate time to explore the impact of the RAEs upon the character of British higher education. This timeliness is reinforced by the earlier publication of HEFCE's own ,Review of Research' (September 2000), the report from the House of Commons' Select Committee on Science and Technology Committee (April 2000), with a report due in April 2003 from the Joint Funding Bodies (under the auspices of Gareth Roberts). We are therefore in a period of review and consultation, which may culminate in a new assessment regime or, as its severest critics would hope, even its demise. While our analysis genuflects to these contemporary developments, it is constructed within a framework that interprets the RAE process as constituting a continuous struggle for the control of the production of high-status knowledge. [source]


    Disciplining the Student Body: Schooling and the Construction of Canadian Children's Bodies, 1930,1960

    HISTORY OF EDUCATION QUARTERLY, Issue 2 2001
    Mona Gleason
    First page of article [source]


    Corpus Meum: Disintegrating Bodies and the Ideal of Integrity

    HYPATIA, Issue 3 2005
    DIANE PERPICH
    This essay shows that Jean-Luc Nancy's reconceptualization of corporeality in such texts as L'Intrus and Corpus can be an important ally to feminist theories of body. I introduce Nancy's ontology and argue that his rejection of the unified, integrated body of humanist discourses in favor of dis-integrated bodies constituted by multiple alterities and his consequent reinterpretation of body as a "being-exscribed" begin the task of thinking bodies beyond traditional dualisms and their ahistorical and rationalist frameworks. I then address three potential criticisms of Nancy's work and suggest that though there may be reasons to move cautiously in adopting the framework he provides, his work harbors resources directly beneficial to critiques of prevailing forms of gender normativity. Quel Útrange moi! ,Jean-Luc Nancy, Corpus [source]


    Reconfiguring Gender with John Dewey: Habit, Bodies, and Cultural Change

    HYPATIA, Issue 1 2000
    SHANNON SULLIVAN
    This paper demonstrates how John Dewey's notion of habit can help us understand gender as a constitutive structure of bodily existence. Bringing Dewey's pragmatism in conjunction with Judith Butler's concept of performativity, 1 provide an account of how rigid binary configurations of gender might be transformed at the level of both individual habit and cultural construct. [source]


    Detecting Foreign Bodies in Food

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, Issue 9 2004
    I.S. Arvanitoyannis Assoc.
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]