Board Roles (board + role)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


An Empirical Taxonomy of Hospital Governing Board Roles

HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, Issue 4 2008
Shoou-Yih D. Lee
Objective. To develop a taxonomy of governing board roles in U.S. hospitals. Data Sources. 2005 AHA Hospital Governance Survey, 2004 AHA Annual Survey of Hospitals, and Area Resource File. Study Design. A governing board taxonomy was developed using cluster analysis. Results were validated and reviewed by industry experts. Differences in hospital and environmental characteristics across clusters were examined. Data Extraction Methods. One-thousand three-hundred thirty-four hospitals with complete information on the study variables were included in the analysis. Principal Findings. Five distinct clusters of hospital governing boards were identified. Statistical tests showed that the five clusters had high internal reliability and high internal validity. Statistically significant differences in hospital and environmental conditions were found among clusters. Conclusions. The developed taxonomy provides policy makers, health care executives, and researchers a useful way to describe and understand hospital governing board roles. The taxonomy may also facilitate valid and systematic assessment of governance performance. Further, the taxonomy could be used as a framework for governing boards themselves to identify areas for improvement and direction for change. [source]


Designing Agendas to Reflect Board Roles and Responsibilities: Results of a Study

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP, Issue 1 2000
Sue Inglis
Over a nine-month period the board agendas of a community nonprofit organization were redesigned to reflect a particular board agenda tool titled "Strategic Activities, Resource Planning, and Operations." Feedback from the board members and executive director indicate strong support for the framework in focusing the work of the board. The framework also has implications for how the executive director and board members prepare for meetings and how the shared leadership of the meetings is played out. [source]


Social services and Primary Care Groups: a window of collaborative opportunity?

HEALTH & SOCIAL CARE IN THE COMMUNITY, Issue 4 2000
Bob Hudson
This paper reports on the findings of two investigations into the relationship between social services and Primary Care Groups (PCGs): a national postal questionnaire and a series of regional seminars. The key findings of both explorations are summarised and placed in the context of other available evidence on the development of PCGs. Issues covered include: the background and status of social services representatives; preparation and support for the board role; feedback and accountability, and early contributions. It is concluded that progress is being made in bringing together the agendas and activities of PCGs and social services, and to a lesser extent the wider local authority, but that important obstacles remain in place. The enduring significance of the resource dependency model needs to be a key factor in emerging partnerships. [source]


The Impact of the Roles, Structure and Process of Boards on Firm Performance: evidence from Turkey

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE, Issue 2 2005
Veysel Kula
This study aims at investigating the impact of the roles, structure and process of boards on performance of Turkish companies. Drawing on the data obtained from a sample of 386 mostly small and non-listed stock ownership companies, it was found that the separation of chairman and general manager positions has significant positive impact on firm performance. From the board roles of control, service and resource acquisition, firm performance was found to be positively related only to the level of adoption of resource acquisition role. It was also found that the effectiveness, information access and performance evaluation attributes of boards are positively and significantly associated with firm performance. [source]


An Empirical Taxonomy of Hospital Governing Board Roles

HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, Issue 4 2008
Shoou-Yih D. Lee
Objective. To develop a taxonomy of governing board roles in U.S. hospitals. Data Sources. 2005 AHA Hospital Governance Survey, 2004 AHA Annual Survey of Hospitals, and Area Resource File. Study Design. A governing board taxonomy was developed using cluster analysis. Results were validated and reviewed by industry experts. Differences in hospital and environmental characteristics across clusters were examined. Data Extraction Methods. One-thousand three-hundred thirty-four hospitals with complete information on the study variables were included in the analysis. Principal Findings. Five distinct clusters of hospital governing boards were identified. Statistical tests showed that the five clusters had high internal reliability and high internal validity. Statistically significant differences in hospital and environmental conditions were found among clusters. Conclusions. The developed taxonomy provides policy makers, health care executives, and researchers a useful way to describe and understand hospital governing board roles. The taxonomy may also facilitate valid and systematic assessment of governance performance. Further, the taxonomy could be used as a framework for governing boards themselves to identify areas for improvement and direction for change. [source]


The Governance of cooperatives and mutual associations: a paradox perspective

ANNALS OF PUBLIC AND COOPERATIVE ECONOMICS, Issue 1 2004
Chris Cornforth
The theoretical literature on the governance of co-operatives is relatively undeveloped in comparison with that on corporate governance. The paper briefly reviews some of the main theoretical perspectives on corporate governance and discusses how they can be usefully extended to throw light on the governance of co-operatives and mutuals. However, taken individually these different theories are rather one dimensional, only illuminating a particular aspect of the board's role. This has lead to calls for a new conceptual framework that can help integrate the insights of these different theories. The paper argues that a paradox perspective offers a promising way forward. Contrasting the different theoretical perspectives highlights some of the important paradoxes, ambiguities and tensions that boards face. [source]


It's not the board's role to act as a management consultant to the CEO

BOARD LEADERSHIP: POLICY GOVERNANCE IN ACTION, Issue 49 2000
Article first published online: 15 MAR 200
No abstract is available for this article. [source]