Bioreactor Configurations (bioreactor + configuration)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Transmural flow bioreactor for vascular tissue engineering

BIOTECHNOLOGY & BIOENGINEERING, Issue 6 2009
Jason W. Bjork
Abstract Nutrient transport limitation remains a fundamental issue for in vitro culture of engineered tissues. In this study, perfusion bioreactor configurations were investigated to provide uniform delivery of oxygen to media equivalents (MEs) being developed as the basis for tissue-engineered arteries. Bioreactor configurations were developed to evaluate oxygen delivery associated with complete transmural flow (through the wall of the ME), complete axial flow (through the lumen), and a combination of these flows. In addition, transport models of the different flow configurations were analyzed to determine the most uniform oxygen profile throughout the tissue, incorporating direct measurements of tissue hydraulic conductivity, cellular O2 consumption kinetics, and cell density along with ME physical dimensions. Model results indicate that dissolved oxygen (DO) uniformity is improved when a combination of transmural and axial flow is implemented; however, detrimental effects could occur due to lumenal pressure exceeding the burst pressure or damaging interstitial shear stress imparted by excessive transmural flow rates or decreasing hydraulic conductivity due to ME compaction. The model was verified by comparing predicted with measured outlet DO concentrations. Based on these results, the combination of a controlled transmural flow coupled with axial flow presents an attractive means to increase the transport of nutrients to cells within the cultured tissue to improve growth (increased cell and extracellular matrix concentrations) as well as uniformity. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2009; 104: 1197,1206. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Membrane bioreactors for regenerative medicine: an example of the bioartificial liver

ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, Issue 1 2010
Sabrina Morelli
Abstract Liver transplantation is the only established treatment for liver failure. Because of the organ scarsity, liver support strategies are being developed with the aim of either supporting patients with the borderline functional liver cell mass until the organ transplantation or liver regeneration. A bioartificial liver (BAL) consisting of functional liver cells supported by an artificial cell culture material could provide a vital temporary support to patients with liver failure, and could serve as a bridge to transplantation while awaiting a suitable donor. In this paper, we discuss the critical issues for the development of BAL such as bioreactor configuration, mass transfer, cell source and culture technique. The characteristics of membrane BAL systems in clinical, preclinical and in vitro tests are reviewed. Membrane bioreactors used for the generation of in vitro physiological model systems for studying biological mechanisms and testing the efficacy of potential therapies are also discussed. Copyright 2009 Curtin University of Technology and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Bioprocesses for air pollution control

JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY & BIOTECHNOLOGY, Issue 10 2009
Christian Kennes
Abstract Bioprocesses have been developed as relatively recent alternatives to conventional, non-biological technologies, for waste gas treatment and air pollution control in general. This paper reviews major biodegradation processes relevant in this field as well as both accepted and major innovative bioreactor configurations studied or used nowadays for the treatment of polluted air, i.e. biofilters, one- and two-liquid phase biotrickling filters, bioscrubbers, membrane bioreactors, rotating biodiscs and biodrums, one- and two-liquid phase suspended growth bioreactors, as well as hybrid reactor configurations. Some of these bioreactors are being used at full-scale for solving air pollution problems, while others are still at the research and development stage at laboratory- or pilot-scale. Copyright 2009 Society of Chemical Industry [source]


Transmural flow bioreactor for vascular tissue engineering

BIOTECHNOLOGY & BIOENGINEERING, Issue 6 2009
Jason W. Bjork
Abstract Nutrient transport limitation remains a fundamental issue for in vitro culture of engineered tissues. In this study, perfusion bioreactor configurations were investigated to provide uniform delivery of oxygen to media equivalents (MEs) being developed as the basis for tissue-engineered arteries. Bioreactor configurations were developed to evaluate oxygen delivery associated with complete transmural flow (through the wall of the ME), complete axial flow (through the lumen), and a combination of these flows. In addition, transport models of the different flow configurations were analyzed to determine the most uniform oxygen profile throughout the tissue, incorporating direct measurements of tissue hydraulic conductivity, cellular O2 consumption kinetics, and cell density along with ME physical dimensions. Model results indicate that dissolved oxygen (DO) uniformity is improved when a combination of transmural and axial flow is implemented; however, detrimental effects could occur due to lumenal pressure exceeding the burst pressure or damaging interstitial shear stress imparted by excessive transmural flow rates or decreasing hydraulic conductivity due to ME compaction. The model was verified by comparing predicted with measured outlet DO concentrations. Based on these results, the combination of a controlled transmural flow coupled with axial flow presents an attractive means to increase the transport of nutrients to cells within the cultured tissue to improve growth (increased cell and extracellular matrix concentrations) as well as uniformity. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2009; 104: 1197,1206. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]