Biopsy Rate (biopsy + rate)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The usefulness of a diagnostic biopsy clinic in a genitourinary medicine setting: recent experience and a review of the literature

JOURNAL OF THE EUROPEAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY & VENEREOLOGY, Issue 8 2006
I Palamaras
Abstract Genital diseases include a wide range of lesions e.g. infectious and inflammatory. In most cases a clinical diagnosis is reached without the need for a biopsy. Nonetheless, a genital biopsy is safe and may help to confirm the diagnosis. We established a dedicated diagnostic biopsy clinic in 2003. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of our diagnostic biopsy clinic and compare it with other Genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics in the UK. A retrospective case-note study was performed on 71 patients referred to the biopsy clinic with persistent genital lesions over a 12-month period. Forty-seven biopsies were performed (71% biopsy rate). 43 specimens (92%) were appropriate for histopathological diagnosis. Of these 15% were lichen planus, 15% lichen sclerosis, 10% psoriasis, 7.5% each: eczema, Zoon's and non-specific balanitis. The remainder represented a variety of other conditions. In 27 cases (68%) the clinical diagnosis was consistent with the histological result. The possibility of self-referral and walk-in nature of our GUM service substantially decrease the waiting times for assessment of anogenital disorders. We had a lower biopsy rate for the diagnosis of non-specific balanitis (7.5%) compared with the average rate (21.5%) in 14 UK GUM clinics and good agreement between clinical and histological diagnosis. An empirical first treatment, with simple emollients before biopsy, appears to be a safe clinical approach for the treatment of non-specific balanitis. A multidisciplinary approach (GUM physicians, dermatologists and urologists/gynaecologists) could help prevent unnecessary biopsies and improve correlation between clinical and histological diagnosis. [source]


Utilization rates, complications and costs of percutaneous liver biopsy: a population-based study including 4275 biopsies

LIVER INTERNATIONAL, Issue 5 2008
Robert P. Myers
Abstract Background: Liver biopsy is an important tool in the management of patients with liver disease. Because biopsy practices may be changing, we studied patterns of use in a large Canadian Health Region. We aimed to describe trends in biopsy utilization and the incidence and costs of complications from a population-based perspective. Methods: Administrative databases were used to identify percutaneous liver biopsies performed between 1994 and 2002. Significant complications were identified by reviewing medical records of patients hospitalized within 7 days of a biopsy and those with a diagnostic code indicative of a procedural complication. Analyses of biopsy rates employed Poisson regression. Results: Between 1994 and 2002, 3627 patients had 4275 liver biopsies (median 1 per patient; range 1,12). Radiologists performed the majority (90%), particularly during the latter years (1994 vs. 2002: 73 vs. 98%; P<0.0001). The overall annual biopsy rate was 54.8 per 100 000 population with a 41% (95% CI 23,61%) increase between 1994 and 2002. Annual increases were greatest in males and patients 30,59 years. Thirty-two patients (0.75%) had significant biopsy-related complications (1994,1997 vs. 1998,2002: 1.28 vs. 0.44%; P=0.003). Pain requiring admission (0.51%) and bleeding (0.35%) were most common. Six patients (0.14%) died; all had malignancies. The median direct cost of a hospitalization for complications was $4579 (range $1164,29 641). Conclusions: Liver biopsy rates are increasing likely owing to the changing epidemiology and management of common liver diseases. The similarity of the complication rate in our population-based study with estimates from specialized centres supports the safety of this important procedure. [source]


Clinical impact of false-negative sentinel node biopsy in primary breast cancer

BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY (NOW INCLUDES EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SURGERY), Issue 11 2002
M. T. Nano
Background: The aim was to assess the false-negative sentinel node biopsy rate in women with early breast cancer and its implications in patient treatment. Methods: Between January 1995 and March 2001, 328 consecutive patients with clinically lymph node-negative primary operable breast cancer underwent lymphatic mapping and sentinel node biopsy using a combination of preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and/or blue dye. All underwent immediate axillary dissection. The intraoperative success rate in sentinel node identification, false-negative rate, predictive value of negative sentinel node status and overall accuracy were assessed. The clinical features and primary tumour characteristics for each false-negative case were reviewed. Results: The sentinel node was identified in 285 (869 per cent) of 328 women. The false-negative rate was 79 per cent (eight of 101). Most members of the breast multidisciplinary team would have instituted adjuvant systemic therapy for six false-negative cases based on clinical features and primary tumour histology. In all, only two (07 per cent) of 285 women who had sentinel node biopsy may have had their management and survival prospects potentially jeopardized owing to a false-negative sentinel node. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that the clinical impact of a false-negative sentinel node is low. 2002 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd [source]


Benign breast lesions at risk of developing cancer,A challenging problem in breast cancer screening programs

CANCER, Issue 3 2009
Five years' experience of the Breast Cancer Screening Program in Verona (1999-2004)
Abstract BACKGROUND: Cytology and core-needle biopsies are not always sufficient to exclude malignancy in benign breast lesions (BBL) that are at risk of developing cancer, and open biopsy often is mandatory. In screening programs, open biopsies performed for lesions that are at risk of developing malignancy are considered benign. The authors of this report evaluated the impact of the screen-detected BBL at risk of developing cancer that were counted in the quota of benign breast open biopsies in the Breast Cancer Screening Program of Verona. METHODS: Benign open biopsies were subdivided into 4 groups according to their risk of developing cancer: Histo1, normal histology; Histo2, ,pure' BBL (fibroadenoma, fibrocystic disease, mastitis, adenosis); Histo3, BBL with a low risk of developing cancer (radial scar, papilloma, papillomatosis, phyllodes tumor, mucocele-like lesion); and Histo4, BBL with a high risk of developing cancer (atypical columnar cell hyperplasia, atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia). RESULTS: Of 510 open biopsies, 83 biopsies were benign, and the ratio of benign to malignant biopsies was 1:5. Histo1 was observed in 4.8% of all benign open biopsies, Histo2 was observed in 37.4%, Histo3 was observed in 31.3%, and Histo4 was observed 26.5%. CONCLUSIONS: BBL at risk of developing cancer may be numerous in screening programs. It is inappropriate to include BBL at risk of developing cancer in the overall benign open biopsy rate. The authors propose separating pure BBL from lesions at higher risk of developing cancer. To date, there is no evidence to support the premise that detecting high-risk proliferative lesions leads to benefits in terms of reduced mortality; however, these lesions need to be counted separately for future evaluations. Cancer 2009. 2008 American Cancer Society. [source]


Utilization rates, complications and costs of percutaneous liver biopsy: a population-based study including 4275 biopsies

LIVER INTERNATIONAL, Issue 5 2008
Robert P. Myers
Abstract Background: Liver biopsy is an important tool in the management of patients with liver disease. Because biopsy practices may be changing, we studied patterns of use in a large Canadian Health Region. We aimed to describe trends in biopsy utilization and the incidence and costs of complications from a population-based perspective. Methods: Administrative databases were used to identify percutaneous liver biopsies performed between 1994 and 2002. Significant complications were identified by reviewing medical records of patients hospitalized within 7 days of a biopsy and those with a diagnostic code indicative of a procedural complication. Analyses of biopsy rates employed Poisson regression. Results: Between 1994 and 2002, 3627 patients had 4275 liver biopsies (median 1 per patient; range 1,12). Radiologists performed the majority (90%), particularly during the latter years (1994 vs. 2002: 73 vs. 98%; P<0.0001). The overall annual biopsy rate was 54.8 per 100 000 population with a 41% (95% CI 23,61%) increase between 1994 and 2002. Annual increases were greatest in males and patients 30,59 years. Thirty-two patients (0.75%) had significant biopsy-related complications (1994,1997 vs. 1998,2002: 1.28 vs. 0.44%; P=0.003). Pain requiring admission (0.51%) and bleeding (0.35%) were most common. Six patients (0.14%) died; all had malignancies. The median direct cost of a hospitalization for complications was $4579 (range $1164,29 641). Conclusions: Liver biopsy rates are increasing likely owing to the changing epidemiology and management of common liver diseases. The similarity of the complication rate in our population-based study with estimates from specialized centres supports the safety of this important procedure. [source]


A Decision Tool for Predicting Sentinel Node Accuracy from Breast Tumor Size and Grade

THE BREAST JOURNAL, Issue 6 2007
FRCS (Gen. Surg.), Nathan Coombs BSc
Abstract:, The ability to predict axillary lymph node involvement in breast cancer patients in the preoperative setting is invaluable. This study provides a simple set of formulae to enable clinicians to make informed decisions in the management of screen-detected breast cancer. The tumor pathology reports were obtained of all 4,585 women identified between 1996 and 1999 in New South Wales (NSW) with T1 or T2 breast cancer by the statewide co-ordinated breast screening service (BreastScreen NSW). Equations predicting node positivity were calculated by linear regression analysis and, from published sentinel node false-negative rates, the probability of retrieval of a false-negative axillary lymph node by sentinel node biopsy was calculated for tumors of different size and grade. Node involvement was identified in 1,089 (23.8%) of women. A linear relationship for tumor size, grade, and nodal involvement was predicted by: frequency (%) = 1.5 tumor size (mm) + 2 (or 6 or 10) for grade I (or II or III) tumors. Assuming a 7.5% false-negative rate, the probability of retrieving a false-negative sentinel node ranged from 0.8% for a patient with a 5 mm, grade I carcinoma to 6.0% for a 50 mm, grade III tumor. These simple formulae are easy to use in a clinical setting. The reference table enables breast surgeons to inform a patient about the absolute probability of false-negative sentinel biopsy rates for patients with screen-detected carcinomas when size can be estimated from preoperative imaging and when tumor grade is often available from preoperative core biopsy. Patients with large, T2 breast tumors may be best treated with axillary dissection rather than sentinel node biopsy alone due to the risk of under-staging the woman's disease and also the high probability of finding a positive sentinel node. [source]