Birthday

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Medical Sciences

Kinds of Birthday

  • first birthday
  • second birthday


  • Selected Abstracts


    A NOT SO HAPPY BIRTHDAY: THE FOSTER YOUTH TRANSITION FROM ADOLESCENCE INTO ADULTHOOD

    FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 2 2010
    Miriam Aroni Krinsky
    Every year close to 25,000 youth age out of our foster care system; without the anchor of a family, former foster youth disproportionately join the ranks of the homeless, incarcerated, and unemployed. While the average age of financial independence in America is twenty-six years of age, we presume that foster youth can somehow attain financial and emotional independence by age eighteen. Instead, these adolescents are woefully unprepared for independent adult life, and when they falter, too often no one is there to provide support or guidance. As a result, former foster youth are ten times more likely to be arrested than youth of the same age, race, and sex and one in four youth who age out of foster care will end up in jail within the first two years after leaving care. This article will discuss strategies for changing these disheartening outcomes for transitioning foster youth, including breaking down our silos and collectively taking charge of the lives of children in our care; keeping a watchful eye on data and outcomes and using that information to guide our actions; ensuring that the voices of youth are an ever-present part of decisions and processes that will chart their future; and educating ourselves about best practices and new approaches. This article also discusses new opportunities that now exist to support foster youth as they move into adulthood, including new federal legislation that,for the first time,will allow states to support foster youth beyond age eighteen. Finally, this article provides a backdrop for this Special Issue and summarizes the insightful articles and innovative thinking contained herein. [source]


    Celebrating the 65th Birthday of Professor Pier Giorgio Righetti

    ELECTROPHORESIS, Issue 8 2006
    Nancy Stellwagen
    No abstracts. [source]


    Celebrating the 75th Birthday of Professor Bertold J. Radola

    ELECTROPHORESIS, Issue 5-6 2006
    Petr Bo, ekArticle first published online: 17 MAR 200
    No abstracts. [source]


    On the Occasion of the 65th Birthday of Dr. Ferdinand Nf

    HELVETICA CHIMICA ACTA, Issue 12 2005
    Roger Snowden
    The following six publications in this issue of Helvetica Chimica Acta are dedicated to Dr. Ferdinand Nf who was Corporate Vice President of R & D at Firmenich (1989,2005). [source]


    Tribute to David H. Solomon, MD, for His Contributions to Geriatrics and Gerontology, on His 80th Birthday

    JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 7s 2003
    Thomas T. Yoshikawa MD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Professor Peter Schreier on his 65th Birthday

    MOLECULAR NUTRITION & FOOD RESEARCH (FORMERLY NAHRUNG/FOOD), Issue 8 2007
    Hans-Ulrich Humpf
    [source]


    Hiltmar Schubert on his 80th Birthday

    PROPELLANTS, EXPLOSIVES, PYROTECHNICS, Issue 3 2007
    Karl-Friedrich Ziegahn
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    EDITORIAL: Flying Without a Plane: Accomplishments of The Journal of Sexual Medicine on Its Third Birthday

    THE JOURNAL OF SEXUAL MEDICINE, Issue 4i 2007
    Irwin Goldstein MD Editor-in-Chief
    [source]


    EDITORIAL: Supporting Sexual Medicine: A Celebration of The Journal of Sexual Medicine's Second Birthday

    THE JOURNAL OF SEXUAL MEDICINE, Issue 4 2006
    Irwin Goldstein MD Editor-in-Chief
    [source]


    EDITORIAL: It Takes a Society to Raise a Journal: Happy First Birthday

    THE JOURNAL OF SEXUAL MEDICINE, Issue 4 2005
    Irwin Goldstein MD Editor-in-Chief
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Veterinarian celebrates Queen's Birthday

    AUSTRALIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL, Issue 7 2004
    Mark Thornley
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Children, admitted to high security (special) hospital

    CRIMINAL BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL HEALTH, Issue 4 2003
    Adolescent Forensic Psychiatry, Claire Dimond Consultant in Child
    Introduction The Special Hospitals in England provide psychiatric treatment in high security. The aim of this study was to examine the demographics and background characteristics of children admitted to high security hospitals in England, using the special hospital case register. Method Forty-six children (the subject group) were admitted to a high security hospital under the MHA (1983) classification of disorder of mental illness and/or psychopathic disorder between 1983 and 1999, 33 (72%) of whom were male. A comparison group of adults was matched on sex, legal classification of detention and MHA 1983 classification of disorder. Results The children were admitted for a similar range of offences to those of the comparison group. However, the children had received convictions for criminal damage and violence at a significantly earlier age, they were more likely to have experienced a change in carer during their childhood, been placed in a children's home and were less likely to be living with a family member on their 16th birthday. Children admitted to special hospital experience a lot of disruption in their childhood and are extremely high users of multi-agency services as they grow up. Discussion Issues are raised regarding how to provide a developmentally sensitive service for children who require high security care. Copyright 2003 Whurr Publishers Ltd. [source]


    Prof Dr Klaus-Werner Benz on the occasion of his 70th birthday

    CRYSTAL RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 1 2008
    Editor-in-Chief Wolfgang Neumann
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Cover Picture: Electrophoresis 7'09

    ELECTROPHORESIS, Issue 7 2009
    Article first published online: 16 APR 200
    Issue no. 7 is a special issue on "Biomarker Discovery and Related Topics". It has 18 articles distributed among four parts including genomic, proteomic, glycoproteomic and metabolomic markers. "New separation technologies, improvements of existing methods and intuitive, elegant applications are providing a representative snapshot on the "state-of-the-art" of the bioanalytical aspects of biomarker discovery today". In addition, as recognition of his significant contribution to the field, this special issue is dedicated to the 70th birthday of Professor Barry L. Karger. [source]


    Cover Picture: Electrophoresis 8/2008

    ELECTROPHORESIS, Issue 8 2008
    Article first published online: 17 APR 200
    Regular issues provide a wide range of research and review articles covering all aspects of electrophoresis. Here you will find cutting-edge articles on methods and theory, instrumentation, nucleic acids, CE and CEC, miniaturization and microfluidics, proteomics and two-dimensional electrophoresis. On April 2 Professor Hjertn celebrated his 80th birthday, and it is an honor to take this opportunity to congratulate him on this special occasion and at the same time on his fruitful work. Stellan Hjertn's distinguished personality in research and life makes this celebration very special. It is therefore appropriate to devote a separate laudation in ELECTROPHORESIS to his achievements through which he has attained renown within the separation science community: indeed, he is considered undoubtedly to be the "Father of Capillary Electrophoresis". Professor Hjertn's preliminary work with Arne Tiselius motivated him to commit his career to electrophoresis: the development of free zone electrophoresis certainly revolutionized separation science, and since the construction of the first "capillary electrophoresis" equipment, one of the most cited works in this field carries his name. His friends were very keen to contribute manuscripts to this Issue, covering almost all areas in which Professor Hjertn has worked in his distinguished career. [source]


    Examining the relationship between typical drinking behavior and 21st birthday drinking behavior among college students: implications for event-specific prevention

    ADDICTION, Issue 5 2009
    Melissa A. Lewis
    ABSTRACT Aims The purpose of this research was to: (i) compare 21st birthday drinking with typical drinking; (ii) assess the prevalence of negative consequences and risk behaviors experienced during the 21st birthday week; and (iii) examine the role of typical drinking and 21st birthday drinking in explaining 21st birthday week negative consequences and risk behaviors. Setting and participants Participants (n = 306; 50% male) included college students turning 21 at a Midwestern public university in the United States. Design and measurement Approximately 1 week prior to their 21st birthday, students completed measures of typical past 3-month alcohol consumption via a web-based survey. Following their birthday, students (n = 296; 50% male) completed measures of 21st birthday week drinking as well as negative consequences and risk behaviors. Findings Findings indicated that students consumed considerably larger amounts of alcohol during the week of their 21st birthdays in comparison to typical weekly consumption. Additionally, students experienced a variety of negative consequences and risk behaviors during the week of their 21st birthday, including hangovers, vomiting and not remembering part of the previous evening. Negative binomial regression results indicated that those most likely to experience more negative consequences and risk behaviors associated with 21st birthday drinking were those who consumed heavy amounts of alcohol the week of their birthday, but who did not typically drink excessively. Conclusions Findings underscore the need to develop event-specific prevention approaches for occasions associated with extreme drinking and provide direction for considering who may be at greatest risk for problems associated with celebratory drinking. [source]


    A Screening test for the prediction of Dravet syndrome before one year of age

    EPILEPSIA, Issue 4 2008
    Junri Hattori
    Summary Purpose: Our aim was to develop a screening test to predict Dravet syndrome before the first birthday based on the clinical characteristics of infants and the SCN1A mutation analysis. Methods: Ninety-six patients who experienced febrile seizures before the age of one were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups,the Dravet syndrome group (n = 46) and the non-Dravet syndrome group (n = 50). We compared the clinical characteristics before one year of age of the two groups. We analyzed all coding exons of the SCN1A gene by the direct sequencing method. Scores from 0 to 3 were assigned to each risk factor based on the odds ratio and p-value. Results: An age of onset of febrile seizure , 7 months, a total number of seizures , 5, and prolonged seizures lasting more than 10 min. were regarded as significant risk factors for Dravet syndrome. Other factors highly predictive of this syndrome were hemiconvulsions, partial seizures, myoclonic seizures, and hot water,induced seizures. A total clinical score of six or above was the cutoff value indicating a high risk of Dravet syndrome. SCN1A missense and truncated mutations were detected significantly more often in the Dravet syndrome group than in the non-Dravet syndrome group. Discussion: This simple screening test was designed to be used by general pediatricians. It could help to predict Dravet syndrome before one year of age. If the sum of the clinical risk score is , 6, then the performance of an SCN1A mutation analysis is recommended. [source]


    The Evolution of Zinjanthropus boisei

    EVOLUTIONARY ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 2 2007
    Paul Constantino
    Abstract Many people assume that OH 5, the type specimen of Paranthropus boisei, collected in 1959, was the first evidence of that taxon to be found, but OH 3, recovered in 1955, predated the discovery of OH 5 by four years. Thus, Paranthropus boisei recently celebrated the equivalent of its fiftieth birthday. This review marks that milestone by examining the way our understanding of this taxon has changed during its fifty, or so, year history. [source]


    Forty years of numerical climate modelling

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLIMATOLOGY, Issue 9 2001
    K. McGuffie
    Abstract Climate modelling is now a mature discipline approaching its fortieth birthday. The need for valid climate forecasts has been underlined by the recognition that human activities are now modifying the climate. The complex nature of the climate system has resulted in the development of a surprisingly large array of modelling tools. Some are relatively simple, such as the earth systems and energy balance models (EBMs), while others are highly sophisticated models which challenge the fastest speeds of the most powerful supercomputers. Indeed, this discipline of the latter half of the twentieth century is so critically dependent on the availability of a means of undertaking powerful calculations that its evolution has matched that of the digital computer. The multi-faceted nature of the climate system demands high quality, and global observations and innovative parameterizations through which processes which cannot be described or calculated explicitly are captured to the extent deemed necessary. Interestingly, results from extremely simple, as well as highly complex and many intermediate model types are drawn upon today for effective formulation and evaluation of climate policies. This paper discusses some of the important developments during the first 40 years of climate modelling from the first models of the global atmosphere to today's models, which typically consist of integrated multi-component representations of the full climate system. The pressures of policy-relevant questions more clearly underline the tension between the need for evaluation against quality data and the unending pressure to improve spatial and temporal resolutions of climate models than at any time since the inception of climate modelling. Copyright 2001 Royal Meteorological Society [source]


    Cutaneous and neurologic manifestations of biotinidase deficiency

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY, Issue 5 2000
    Paloma Cornejo Navarro
    A male newborn with no obstetric or familial antecedents, except that his parents were cousins, developed hypotonia, lethargy, and feeding problems from birth. Analysis revealed a marked metabolic acidosis and hyperammonemia. Three weeks later, he was admitted to hospital in order to receive parenteral nutrition and to undertake a study for metabolic diseases. The boy did not improve in spite of the use of parenteral nutrition and began to present with inspiratory stridor and tachypnea. One week later, he presented with an erythematous scaling eruption, which was especially intense in the lumbosacral region ( Fig. 1a,b). The scalp was only slightly affected. Figure 1. Erythematous scaling eruption, more intense in the lumbosacral region Laboratory findings were compatible with biotinidase deficiency diagnosed by demonstrating absent enzyme activity. His parents were also studied and they were found to have partial biotinidase deficiency (30% of enzyme activity). After 37 days of life, the baby was given a treatment consisting of 20 mg of biotin per day intravenously. Biochemical and neurologic alterations improved quickly. Meckel's diverticulum and a duodenal membrane were detected at the second month of life after a gastroduodenal survey, and both were operated on. The skin lesions did not improve, however, and intravenous biotin had to be increased to 40 mg/day. The eruption disappeared after 10 days. On his first birthday, he remained asymptomatic with 40 mg of oral biotin. [source]


    Tribute to Jean-Michel Grandmont

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC THEORY, Issue 3-4 2006
    Guy Laroque
    A11; B31; E00 This note is a tribute to Jean-Michel Grandmont on the occasion of his 65th birthday. [source]


    40th anniversary of APLAR: happy birthday!

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES, Issue 2 2003
    APLAR, Prakash K. Pispati President
    [source]


    Alternation of Chemoselective Control in Stille,Heck and Heck,Stille Reaction Sequences

    ADVANCED SYNTHESIS & CATALYSIS (PREVIOUSLY: JOURNAL FUER PRAKTISCHE CHEMIE), Issue 7-8 2009
    Kye-Simeon Masters
    The communication by Kye-Simeon Masters and Bernard L. Flynn in Issue 4, 2009, pp. 530,536 (DOI: 10.1002/adsc.200800678), should have appeared in this issue dedicated to Professor Armin de Meijere. It was published in Issue 4, 2009, by mistake. On the title page, below the received and publication dates, the following dedication should appear: "Dedicated to Professor Armin de Meijere on the occasion of his 70th birthday." The editorial office apologizes for this mistake. [source]


    Congratulations to Prof. Dr Franz Pirchner on his 80th birthday

    JOURNAL OF ANIMAL BREEDING AND GENETICS, Issue 6 2006
    Article first published online: 28 NOV 200
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    A TRIBUTE TO Professor Richard A. Lockshin on his 70th birthday

    JOURNAL OF CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE, Issue 6 2007
    Afshin Samali
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    A TRIBUTE TO Professor Christian de Duve on his 90th birthday

    JOURNAL OF CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE, Issue 5 2007
    Pierre Courtoy MD PhD
    First page of article [source]


    From differential display to DNA microarrays,a personal account

    JOURNAL OF CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY, Issue 3 2006
    Peng Liang
    This article is a tribute to Dr. Arthur Pardee, one of the most innovative and brilliant scientists of our time, on the occasion of his 85th birthday. In this partially perspective and partially review piece, I look back how fate, by twist and turn, has led me eventually to his lab at Harvard where we worked out the Differential Display technology from scratch, how the method has revolutionized the field of gene expression analysis and where DD is taking us in the "era" of DNA microarrays. J. Cell. Physiol. 209: 653,658, 2006. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


    Synthesis of spirolactones by 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions to methyl (S)-3-[(E)-cyanomethylidene]-2-oxotetrahydrofuran-5-carboxylate

    JOURNAL OF HETEROCYCLIC CHEMISTRY, Issue 2 2002
    Samo Pirc
    Dedicated to Professor Emeritus Miha Ti,ler on the occasion of his 75th birthday Treatment of methyl (S)-5-[(E)-(dimethylamino)methylidene]-2-oxotetrahydrofuran-5-carboxylate (2) with potassium cyanide in acetic acid gave (S)-5-[(E)-cyanomethylidene]-2-oxotetrahydrofuran-5-car-boxylate (3), which was used as chiral dipolarophile in 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions. Reactions of 3 with diazomethane (4) and nitrile oxides 5a-c afforded spirolactones 6,8 in 24-34% diastereomeric excess, while with diazomethane (4) in the presence of triethylamine, methyl 3-cyanomethyl-2-methoxyfuran-5-carboxylate (12) was obtained. [source]


    Assessing Future Possible Selves by Gender and Socioeconomic Status Using the Anticipated Life History Measure

    JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 1 2001
    Harry G. Segal
    This is a report from the first phase of a longitudinal study of the ways young adults imagine their future lives. The future possible selves of 223 18- and 19-year-old adults were examined using the Anticipated Life History measure (ALH), a psychological instrument prompting participants to describe their future life course from their 21st birthday until their death. When the ALH narratives were coded for presence/absence of life events, female participants were more likely to predict career choice, marriage, children, divorce, and death of spouse than their male counterparts; when coded for psychological qualities, female participants demonstrated greater psychological complexity and awareness of future life role choices and conflicts. Participants with lower SES wrote ALH narratives with fewer altruistic acts, less awareness of life role complexity, and fewer anticipated conflicts and their resolutions than those with higher SES. [source]


    Tribute to Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Merbach on his 65th birthday

    JOURNAL OF PLANT NUTRITION AND SOIL SCIENCE, Issue 6 2004
    J. Austin
    [source]