Youth Development (youth + development)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Youth Development

  • positive youth development

  • Terms modified by Youth Development

  • youth development program
  • youth development study

  • Selected Abstracts


    Pathways of Youth Development in a Rural Trailer Park,

    FAMILY RELATIONS, Issue 2 2006
    Katherine A. MacTavish
    Abstract: Limited empirical documentation exists for the developmental pathways available to rural youth growing up in low-resource community settings. Drawing on ethnographic data, this article examines the developmental pathways experienced by youth in a rural trailer park. Findings reveal how various factors, some inherent to working poor class status and others unique to trailer park residence and small town community, challenge youth's access to a pathway offering broader life chances. [source]


    Contemporary Models of Youth Development and Problem Prevention: Toward an Integration of Terms, Concepts, and Models

    FAMILY RELATIONS, Issue 1 2004
    Stephen Small
    Over the past several years, increased interest in preventing youth problems and promoting healthy youth development has led youth and family practitioners, policy makers, and researchers to develop a wide range of approaches based on various theoretical frameworks. Although the growth in guiding frameworks has led to more complex models and a greater diversity in the options available to scholars and practitioners, the lack of an integrative conceptual scheme and consistent terminology has led to some confusion in the field. Here, we provide an overview of three approaches to youth development and problem prevention, critically examine their strengths and weaknesses, and offer some elaborations to help clarify, extend, and integrate the models. We conclude by discussing some general implications for researchers, practitioners, and policy makers. [source]


    Exploring Youth Development With Diverse Children: Correlates of Risk, Health, and Thriving Behaviors

    JOURNAL FOR SPECIALISTS IN PEDIATRIC NURSING, Issue 1 2009
    Laureen H. Smith
    PURPOSE.,This study explored the relationships between internal and external assets, risk behaviors, health behaviors, and thriving behaviors in diverse children. DESIGN AND METHODS.,The strength of relationships existing between measures, differences between group means based on gender, grades earned, and school, and confidence interval (p , .05) were tested in a sample of 61 urban sixth graders. RESULTS.,Few assets were related to substance use. Assets were related to delinquency acts, health behaviors, and thriving indicators. Group differences between schools and gender and the total number of assets were noted. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS.,Supporting assets are important to consider when nurses perform assessments and design interventions to support youths in their maturation processes. [source]


    Familial Factors Associated With the Use of Multiple Child-Care Arrangements

    JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 2 2008
    Taryn W. Morrissey
    This study examined the use of multiple, concurrent, nonparental child-care arrangements among children under 5 with employed mothers in the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (N= 759). Older children, those primarily cared for in informal child care, those living in cohabitating or single-parent households, and those whose mothers were employed for 40 or fewer hours per week were likely to be in multiple arrangements. Higher quality primary child-care and lower maternal satisfaction with primary care predicted the subsequent use of multiple arrangements. Little support for income differences in selection into multiple arrangements was found. Findings highlight the importance of child-care characteristics and structure in child-care choice. Policy implications are discussed. [source]


    Longitudinal Studies of Anger and Attention Span: Context and Informant Effects

    JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 2 2010
    Jungmeen Kim
    ABSTRACT This study examined stabilities of informant and context (home vs. classroom) latent factors regarding anger and attention. Participants included children from the National Institute of Child Health and Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development who were measured at 54 months, first grade, and third grade. Latent factors of anger and attention span were structured using different indicators based on mothers', fathers', caregivers', teachers', and observers' reports. We used structural equation modeling to examine the autoregressive effects within a context (stability), the concurrent associations between home and classroom contexts, and informant effects. The results indicated that for both anger and attention (1) there were significant informant effects that influenced stability in a context, (2) there was higher stability in home context than nonhome context, and (3) stability within a context increased over time. The findings suggested that anger was more prone to context effects and informant effects than attention. [source]


    Collaborating on Evaluation for Youth Development

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR EVALUATION, Issue 98 2003
    Genevieve Lau
    Youth workers acquire evaluation skills to improve professional practice and then empower youth by teaching them how to evaluate their own experiences. [source]


    The Course and Quality of Intimate Relationships Among Psychologically Distressed Mothers

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, Issue 1 2010
    Lauren M. Papp
    The longitudinal course and quality of intimate relationships were tested in relation to maternal depressive symptoms in a sample of 1,275 families from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. Assessments of mothers' intimate relationship status, intimate relationship quality, and depressive symptoms were obtained on 11 occasions from the birth of a child through age 15. Consistent with predictions, results from hierarchical linear models indicated that maternal depressive symptoms over time were associated with a lower probability of being married and lower levels of relationship quality. The strength of the association between relationship quality and depression was stronger than the linkage between relationship course and depression. Sociodemographic characteristics (e.g., mother age, child gender, ethnicity) were more predictive of trajectories of relationship course than relationship quality. Findings are discussed in terms of efforts to prevent and treat the longitudinal interplay between poor intimate relationship functioning and partners' psychopathology and its implications for the overall health and well-being of parents, couples, and children. [source]


    A Process Model of Attachment,Friend Linkages: Hostile Attribution Biases, Language Ability, and Mother,Child Affective Mutuality as Intervening Mechanisms

    CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Issue 6 2008
    Nancy L. McElwain
    This study identified mechanisms through which child,mother attachment security at 36 months was associated with mother- and teacher-reported friendship quality at 3rd grade. Data from a subsample of 1,071 children (536 boys) participating in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development were used. Separate structural equation models were tested for mother and teacher reports of peer functioning. For both models, the total indirect effect between attachment security and friendship quality was significant. Tests of specific indirect effects indicated that attachment security was associated with friendship quality via greater mother,child affective mutuality and better language ability at 54 months and fewer hostile attributions (teacher model only) and greater peer competence at first grade. The findings highlight interpersonal and intrapersonal mechanisms of attachment,friend linkages. [source]


    ENSURING AUTHENTIC YOUTH PARTICIPATION IN DELINQUENCY CASES: CREATING A PARADIGM FOR SPECIALIZED JUVENILE DEFENSE PRACTICE

    FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 3 2007
    Patricia Puritz
    In delinquency courts, juvenile defense attorneys are essential for guaranteeing children's due process rights and encouraging their meaningful participation in the proceedings. Yet, indigent defense delivery systems are largely failing youth accused of committing crimes. This article highlights the importance of developing systems that support the highly specialized practice area of juvenile defense. To protect their clients' rights and meet their ethical obligations, juvenile defense attorneys must zealously advocate for their clients' expressed interests and must strategically address the biases and misunderstandings prevalent in delinquency courts. Specifically, defense attorneys must vigorously challenge systemic race, class, and gender injustices; incorporate expert knowledge of youth development into their advocacy; and protect clients' mental health and educational interests. Such holistic representation promotes rehabilitation and reduces recidivism. Because of numerous obstacles that currently impede defense attorneys from engaging in such exemplary practice, systemic reforms are necessary to support high-quality defense representation and, ultimately, ensure that youths' rights are protected. [source]


    Contemporary Models of Youth Development and Problem Prevention: Toward an Integration of Terms, Concepts, and Models

    FAMILY RELATIONS, Issue 1 2004
    Stephen Small
    Over the past several years, increased interest in preventing youth problems and promoting healthy youth development has led youth and family practitioners, policy makers, and researchers to develop a wide range of approaches based on various theoretical frameworks. Although the growth in guiding frameworks has led to more complex models and a greater diversity in the options available to scholars and practitioners, the lack of an integrative conceptual scheme and consistent terminology has led to some confusion in the field. Here, we provide an overview of three approaches to youth development and problem prevention, critically examine their strengths and weaknesses, and offer some elaborations to help clarify, extend, and integrate the models. We conclude by discussing some general implications for researchers, practitioners, and policy makers. [source]


    HUI M,lama O Ke Kai: a positive prevention-based youth development program based on native hawaiian values and activities,

    JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 8 2009
    Earl S. Hishinuma
    Evaluation of after-school programs that are culturally and place-based and promote positive youth development among minority and indigenous youths has not been widely published. The present evaluation is the first of its kind of an after-school, youth-risk prevention program called Hui Mal,ma O Ke Kai (HMK), that emphasizes Native Hawaiian values and activities to promote positive youth development for fifth and sixth graders (N=110) in a rural Native Hawaiian community. Results indicated positive gains on youth self-reports in Native Hawaiian values, self-esteem, antidrug use, violence prevention strategies, and healthy lifestyle in Year 1, and in family cohesion, school success, and violence prevention strategies in Year 2. Parent reports of their children indicated positive gains in selected domains. Implications include the support for a promising culturally appropriate program, expansion to middle-school-aged youths, and parent involvement. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


    Positive youth development, willful adolescents, and mentoring

    JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 6 2006
    Reed Larson
    This article describes positive youth development as a process in which young people's capacity for being motivated by challenge energizes their active engagement in development. The first part of the article discusses the conditions under which this motivation is activated and considers obstacles to its activation in daily life. The second part discusses ways in which caring adults, including mentors, can support this process of positive development. Several frameworks that provide models of how adults can provide needed structure and guidance while supporting youth's development as agents of their own growth are discussed. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


    A model for the influence of mentoring relationships on youth development

    JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 6 2006
    Jean E. Rhodes
    Anecdotal reports of the protective qualities of mentoring relationships for youth are corroborated by a growing body of research. What is missing, however, is research on the processes by which mentors influence developmental outcomes. In this article, we present a conceptual model of the mentoring process along with a delineation of some of the current research on what makes for more effective mentoring relationships. A set of recommendations for future research is offered. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


    They still pick me up when I fall: the role of caring in youth development and community life.

    JOURNAL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS, Issue 2 2002
    By D. A. Rauner.
    [source]


    Initiating Sexual Experiences: How Do Young Adolescents Make Decisions Regarding Early Sexual Activity?

    JOURNAL OF RESEARCH ON ADOLESCENCE, Issue 4 2005
    Tricia M. Michels
    Understanding how young adolescents make decisions to engage in early sexual activities is vital for intervention efforts aimed at fostering positive youth development and reducing the negative outcomes of adolescent sexual behavior. In-depth interviews with 42 suburban, mostly White, ninth-grade adolescents (52% females, mean age=14.1, SD=.45) elicited accounts of their early sexual decisions. We adapted grounded theory methodology to build a model of sexual decision making from the adolescents' narratives. Six dominant categories emerged: contextual factors (relationship and personal characteristics), consideration of risks and benefits, boundary setting, boundary communication, the sexual experience, and evaluation. Our model of early sexual decision-making processes, developed from the perspectives of young adolescents, highlights active consideration of health and social risks and benefits, as well as the generation of options regarding sexual activity. The model also shows that young adolescents set clear boundaries of sexual limits and evaluate sexual experiences, suggesting a dynamic process of decision making. [source]


    School Disconnectedness: Identifying Adolescents at Risk in Ontario, Canada

    JOURNAL OF SCHOOL HEALTH, Issue 7 2009
    Guy E. J. Faulkner PhD
    ABSTRACT Background:, There is strong theoretical and empirical support for school connectedness as an important element of healthy youth development. The primary objective of this study was to replicate previous research identifying factors differentiating youth who do not feel connected to their schools in a sample of adolescents in Ontario, Canada. A secondary objective was to extend this work by assessing whether physical activity was an additional health behavior that differentiated youth who feel connected to their schools from those who do not. Methods:, Data for this study were based on questionnaires from 2243 grade 7 to grade 12 students derived from the 2001 cycle of the Ontario Student Drug Use Survey. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between physical activity, other health risk factors, and school disconnectedness. Results:, The odds of feeling disconnected from their schools were substantially greater for female students who perceived their health or academic performance to be poor, engaged in no vigorous physical activity, reported 3 or more physician visits during the past year, and had low extracurricular involvement. None of the sociodemographic factors or substance use measures was significantly associated with school disconnectedness for any students. Conclusions:, Our results highlight sex differences in how school disconnectedness is related to health-compromising behaviors such as physical inactivity. Further research is required to examine how boys and girls perceive, interpret, and internalize the school climate. Increasing school connectedness should be a consideration for academic administrators and health-promotion advocates. [source]


    University-school-community partnerships for youth development and democratic renewal

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, Issue 122 2009
    Ira Harkavy
    Democratic partnerships of universities, schools, and an array of neighborhood and community organizations are the most promising means of improving the lives of our nation's young people. Over the past two decades, many colleges and universities have been experiencing a renaissance in engagement activities. Universities, once ivory towers, have increasingly come to recognize that their destinies are inextricably linked with their communities. Authentic democratic partnerships have three characteristics: they are devised to achieve democratic purposes, the collective work is advanced through inclusive and democratic processes, and the product these partnerships produce benefits all participants and results in a strengthening of the democratic practices within the community. [source]


    The connection: Schooling, youth development, and community building,The Futures Academy case

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, Issue 122 2009
    Henry Louis Taylor Jr.
    Universities, because of their vast human and fiscal resources, can play the central role in assisting in the development of school-centered community development programs that make youth development their top priority. The Futures Academy, a K,8 public school in the Fruit Belt, an inner-city neighborhood in Buffalo, New York, offers a useful model of community development in partnership with the Center for Urban Studies at the State University of New York at Buffalo. The goal of the project is to create opportunities for students to apply the knowledge and skills they learn in the classroom to the goal of working with others to make the neighborhood a better place to live. The efforts seek to realize in practice the Dewey dictum that individuals learn best when they have "a real motive behind and a real outcome ahead." [source]


    Classroom processes and positive youth development: Conceptualizing, measuring, and improving the capacity of interactions between teachers and students

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, Issue 121 2009
    Robert C. Pianta
    The National Research Council's (NRC) statement and description of features of settings that have value for positive youth development have been of great importance in shifting discourse toward creating programs that capitalize on youth motivations toward competence and connections with others. This assets-based approach to promote development is consistent with the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) framework for measuring and improving the quality of teacher-student interactions in classroom settings. This chapter highlights the similarities between the CLASS and NRC systems and describes the CLASS as a tool for standardized measurement and improvement of classrooms and their effects on children. It argues that the next important steps to be taken in extending the CLASS and NRC frameworks involve reengineering assessments of teacher and classroom quality and professional development around observations of teachers' performance. This might include using observations in policies regarding teacher quality or a "highly effective teacher" that may emanate from the reauthorization of No Child Left Behind and moving away from a course or workshop mode of professional development to one that ties supports directly to teachers' practices in classroom settings. [source]


    The hidden crisis in mental health and education: The gap between student needs and existing supports

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, Issue 120 2008
    Tina Malti
    The authors provide a selected review of mental health and educational concerns evident in U.S. middle schools and describes promising and important strategies to ameliorate the high rates of students with mental health and academic difficulties. Despite some promising and important strategies, service systems are fragmented, and comprehensive systems of supports are still in development. Furthermore, there remains a lack of integrated developmental considerations in practice. The RALLY approach systematically introduces development and caring adult relationships into preventive practice and combines mental health, education, and youth development to promote students' resiliency and academic potential. [source]


    Responding to the crisis: RALLY's developmental and relational approach

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, Issue 120 2008
    Gil G. Noam
    The authors introduce the RALLY (Responsive Advocacy for Life and Learning in Youth) approach. RALLY is a school- and afterschool-based approach addressing academic success, youth development, and mental health for youth. Based on developmental and relational principles, RALLY's main goals are to promote students' resiliency, development, and academic functioning, as well as to reduce the typical adolescent's risks. By implementing a new professional role of RALLY practitioners, who are developmental specialists and interconnect the different social worlds of students, RALLY creates the resources to provide social opportunities and quality practices to meet students' needs and facilitate their growth. A three-tiered system helps to implement mental health and educational practice, thus providing differential support for students with different needs. Early identification of risks and resiliencies helps to avoid chronicity and pinpoint adequate treatments as soon as possible. [source]


    Spiritual development: A missing priority in youth development

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, Issue 118 2008
    Peter L. Benson
    Addressing the spiritual development of young people has the potential to strengthen youth work and its outcomes. Spiritual development matters because it is an intrinsic part of being human and because young people themselves view it as important. This article reviews the research that points to positive impacts of spiritual development for youth and notes that in an increasingly pluralistic society, everyone needs to build skills for negotiating religious and spiritual diversity. The authors propose that spiritual development involves, in part, the dynamic interplay of three dimensions: belonging and connecting, awareness and awakening, and a way of living. Three initial challenges and opportunities are emerging: empowering youth to explore core developmental issues, motivation and focus, and multisector engagement. [source]


    Youth organizing: From youth development to school reform

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, Issue 117 2008
    Mark R. Warren
    Over the past twenty years, youth organizing has grown across the country. Through organizing, young people identify issues of concern and mobilize their peers to build action campaigns to achieve their objectives. Youth organizing has been appreciated for its contributions to youth and community development. The authors use two case studies to trace the more recent emergence of youth organizing as an important force for school reform. The Boston-based Hyde Square Task Force began with a focus on afterschool programming, but its youth leaders now organize to get Boston Public Schools to adopt a curriculum addressing sexual harassment. Meanwhile, the Baltimore Algebra Project began as a peer-to-peer tutoring program but now also organizes to demand greater funding for Baltimore schools. These cases illustrate a broader phenomenon where students reverse the deficit paradigm by acting out of their own self-interest to become agents of institutional change. [source]


    Framing youth issues for public support

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, Issue 112 2006
    Ann Lochner
    Communicating effectively about the community's role in promoting positive youth development is critical to generating public support for quality youth programs. [source]


    Toward a new paradigm for youth development

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, Issue 112 2006
    Dale A. Blyth
    A diet-and-exercise analogy is proposed to provide a new way of understanding the complexity of youth development and the increased role of youth in shaping that development during the middle years. [source]


    Parent-child connections: The essential component for positive youth development and mental health, safe communities, and academic achievement

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, Issue 103 2004
    William S. Pollack
    Healthy adolescents mature within the context of loving relationships and ongoing connections. [source]


    The social worlds of immigrant youth

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, Issue 100 2003
    Carola Suárez-Orozco
    This introductory chapter uses a detailed case study to illustrate the interconnection of multiple social influences on one particular youth's path of migration. It further identifies some of the major influences on immigrant youth development, including the stresses of migration, separations and reunifications, changing networks of relations, poverty and segregation, and identity formation. [source]


    From assets to agents of change: Social justice, organizing, and youth development

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, Issue 96 2002
    Shawn Ginwright
    Young people are joining together to demand a voice in the decisions that affect their lives. In the process, they are transforming policies and making institutions more accountable. [source]


    Identity processes and the positive youth development of African Americans: An explanatory framework

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, Issue 95 2002
    Dena Phillips Swanson
    This chapter presents Spencer's phenomenological variant of ecological systems theory, or PVEST (1995), as a conceptual framework for examining positive youth development. Contextual factors affecting racial and gender identity of African American youth are discussed, with the focus on the influence of schools and religious institutions. [source]


    Wellness promotion in the schools: Enhancing students' mental and physical health

    PSYCHOLOGY IN THE SCHOOLS, Issue 1 2008
    David N. Miller
    Wellness promotion addresses both the reduction of disorder and disease and the enhancement of mental and physical health. There is increasing evidence of a strong and reciprocal relationship between mental and physical health, and linking these two areas may be particularly useful for promoting positive youth development in school contexts. This article discusses the relationship between mental and physical health in children and adolescents, and how to promote both within schools. Topics discussed include the benefits of (a) hope and optimism, (b) structured extracurricular activities, and (c) sport and exercise psychology for school-based health and wellness promotion. These topics are linked in that each has the potential to positively affect both mental and physical health in children and adolescents in schools. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]