X-ray Band (x-ray + band)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Delayed X-ray emission from fallback in compact-object mergers

MONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY, Issue 4 2009
Elena M. Rossi
ABSTRACT When double neutron star or neutron star,black hole binaries merge, the final remnant may comprise a central solar-mass black hole surrounded by a ,0.01,0.1 M, torus. The subsequent evolution of this disc may be responsible for short ,-ray bursts (SGRBs). A comparable amount of mass is ejected into eccentric orbits and will eventually fallback to the merger site after ,0.01 s. In this paper, we investigate analytically the fate of the fallback matter, which may provide a luminous signal long after the disc is exhausted. We find that matter in the eccentric tail returns at a super-Eddington rate and eventually (,0.1 s) is unable to cool via neutrino emission and accrete all the way to the black hole. Therefore, contrary to previous claims, our analysis suggests that fallback matter is not an efficient source of late-time accretion power and unlikely to cause the late-flaring activity observed in SGRB afterglows. The fallback matter rather forms a radiation-driven wind or a bound atmosphere. In both the cases, the emitting plasma is very opaque and photons are released with a degraded energy in the X-ray band. We therefore suggest that compact binary mergers could be followed by an ,X-ray renaissance', as late as several days to weeks after the merger. This might be observed by the next generation of X-ray detectors. [source]


A Chandra observation of the H2O megamaser IC 2560

MONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY, Issue 4 2002
K. Iwasawa
Abstract A short Chandra ACIS-S observation of the Seyfert 2 galaxy IC 2560, which hosts a luminous nuclear water megamaser, shows (1) that the X-ray emission is extended; (2) that the X-ray spectrum displays emission features in the soft (E < 2 keV) X-ray band (this is the major component of the extended emission); and (3) a very strong (EW , 3.6 keV) iron K, line at 6.4 keV on a flat continuum. This last feature clearly indicates that the X-ray source is hidden behind Compton-thick obscuration, so that the intrinsic hard X-ray luminosity must be much higher than that observed, probably close to ,3 1042 erg s,1. We briefly discuss the implications for powering of the maser emission and the central source. [source]


Inferring X-ray coronal structures from Zeeman,Doppler images

MONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY, Issue 4 2002
M. Jardine
Abstract We have modelled the X-ray emission from the young rapid rotator AB Doradus (Prot= 0.514 d) using as a basis Zeeman,Doppler maps of the surface magnetic field. This allows us to reconcile the apparently conflicting observations of a high X-ray emission measure and coronal density with a low rotational modulation in the X-ray band. The technique is to extrapolate the coronal field from the surface maps by assuming the field to be potential. We then determine the coronal density for an isothermal corona by solving hydrostatic equilibrium along each field line and scaling the surface plasma pressure with the surface magnetic pressure. We set the density to zero along those field lines that are open and those where at any point along their length the plasma pressure exceeds the magnetic pressure. We then calculate the optically thin X-ray emission measure and rotational modulation for models with a range of coronal densities. Although the corona can be very extended, much of the emission comes from high-latitude regions close to the stellar surface. Since these are always in view as the star rotates, there is little rotational modulation. We find that emission measures in the observed range 1052.8,1053.3 cm,3 can be reproduced with densities in the range 109,1010.7 cm,3 for coronae at temperatures of 106,107 K. [source]


Discovery of a short orbital period in the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient IGR J16479,4514

MONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY: LETTERS (ELECTRONIC), Issue 1 2009
Chetana Jain
ABSTRACT We report here the discovery of a 3.32 d orbital period in the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient (SFXT) source IGR J16479,4514. Using the long-term light curve of this source obtained with Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) in the energy range of 15,50 keV, we have clearly detected an orbital modulation including a full eclipse of duration ,0.6 d. In the hard X-ray band of the BAT instrument, the eclipse ingress and egress are rapid. We have also used the long-term light curve obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) All Sky Monitor (ASM) in the energy range of 1.5,12 keV. Taken independently, the detection of orbital modulation in the RXTE,ASM light curve is not significant. However, considering a clear detection of orbital modulation in the BAT light curve, we have used the ASM light curve for a more precise determination of the orbital period. IGR J16479,4514 has the shortest orbital period among the three SFXTs with measured/known orbital period. We discuss the implication of a short orbital period with the various mechanisms proposed to explain the transient nature of this class of sources. [source]