Workers

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Workers

  • agency worker
  • agricultural worker
  • aid worker
  • american worker
  • ant worker
  • black worker
  • blue-collar worker
  • care worker
  • clerical worker
  • commercial sex worker
  • community health worker
  • construction worker
  • contingent worker
  • core worker
  • disabled worker
  • disaster relief worker
  • domestic worker
  • employed worker
  • exposed worker
  • factory worker
  • farm worker
  • female sex worker
  • female worker
  • foreign worker
  • foundry worker
  • frontline worker
  • full-time worker
  • graduate mental health worker
  • guest worker
  • health care worker
  • health worker
  • health-care worker
  • healthcare worker
  • hospital worker
  • individual worker
  • indoor worker
  • industrial worker
  • industry worker
  • informal worker
  • injured worker
  • japanese worker
  • key worker
  • knowledge worker
  • laboratory worker
  • low-wage worker
  • maintenance worker
  • male worker
  • manual worker
  • manufacturing worker
  • mental health worker
  • metal worker
  • mexican worker
  • migrant worker
  • nestmate worker
  • new worker
  • office worker
  • older worker
  • other worker
  • part-time worker
  • previous worker
  • primary care worker
  • production worker
  • professional worker
  • public health worker
  • relief worker
  • sector worker
  • self-employed worker
  • service worker
  • sex worker
  • skilled worker
  • small worker
  • social worker
  • support worker
  • temporary agency worker
  • temporary worker
  • textile worker
  • u.s. worker
  • unemployed worker
  • unskilled worker
  • voluntary worker
  • wage worker
  • welfare worker
  • white-collar worker
  • woman worker
  • young worker
  • younger worker
  • youth worker

  • Terms modified by Workers

  • worker attitude
  • worker bee
  • worker characteristic
  • worker effort
  • worker experience
  • worker productivity
  • worker program
  • worker representation
  • worker reproduction
  • worker right
  • worker role
  • worker scheme
  • worker wage

  • Selected Abstracts


    EMPLOYMENT OF OLDER WORKERS IN POLAND: ISSUES AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS1

    ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, Issue 4 2008
    Piotr ZientaraArticle first published online: 22 DEC 200
    The aim of this paper is to discuss barriers to the employment of older workers in Poland, where, due to various structural weaknesses and institutional arrangements, this problem has taken on a particularly acute seriousness. After analysing the causes of inactivity amongst older workers, the paper concludes by making policy recommendations. [source]


    WORKERS SHOULD HOLD SHARES IN THE COMPANY THEY WORK FOR

    ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, Issue 2 2002
    Geoffrey E. Wood
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    IMPOSING LABOUR STANDARDS HELPS THE POOR AND PROTECTS DO MESTIC WORKERS

    ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, Issue 1 2002
    Geoffrey E. Wood
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    OUTSOURCING TYPES, RELATIVE WAGES, AND THE DEMAND FOR SKILLED WORKERS: NEW EVIDENCE FROM U.S. MANUFACTURING

    ECONOMIC INQUIRY, Issue 1 2009
    AEKAPOL CHONGVILAIVAN
    Existing studies on the impact of outsourcing on relative wages and the demand for skilled workers mainly focus on aggregate outsourcing, in which imported intermediate inputs are used as a proxy. We depart from the existing studies by focusing on various types of outsourcing based on the six-digit NAICS U.S. manufacturing data. We show that downstream materials and service outsourcing are skill biased, whereas upstream materials outsourcing is not. We also produce other supplementary results pertaining to the impact of technology, different capital inputs on relative wages, and the demand for skilled workers. (JEL C33, F14, F15) [source]


    SEX-RATIO CONFLICT BETWEEN QUEENS AND WORKERS IN EUSOCIAL HYMENOPTERA: MECHANISMS, COSTS, AND THE EVOLUTION OF SPLIT COLONY SEX RATIOS

    EVOLUTION, Issue 12 2005
    Ken R. Helms
    Abstract Because workers in the eusocial Hymenoptera are more closely related to sisters than to brothers, theory predicts that natural selection should act on them to bias (change) sex allocation to favor reproductive females over males. However, selection should also act on queens to prevent worker bias. We use a simulation approach to analyze the coevolution of this conflict in colonies with single, once-mated queens. We assume that queens bias the primary (egg) sex ratio and workers bias the secondary (adult) sex ratio, both at some cost to colony productivity. Workers can bias either by eliminating males or by directly increasing female caste determination. Although variation among colonies in kin structure is absent, simulations often result in bimodal (split) colony sex ratios. This occurs because of the evolution of two alternative queen or two alternative worker biasing strategies, one that biases strongly and another that does not bias at all. Alternative strategies evolve because the mechanisms of biasing result in accelerating benefits per unit cost with increasing bias, resulting in greater fitness for strategies that bias more and bias less than the population equilibrium. Strategies biasing more gain from increased biasing efficiency whereas strategies biasing less gain from decreased biasing cost. Our study predicts that whether queens or workers evolve alternative strategies depends upon the mechanisms that workers use to bias the sex ratio, the relative cost of queen and worker biasing, and the rates at which queen and worker strategies evolve. Our study also predicts that population and colony level sex allocation, as well as colony productivity, will differ diagnostically according to whether queens or workers evolve alternative biasing strategies and according to what mechanism workers use to bias sex allocation. [source]


    ,GLOCAL' MOVEMENTS: PLACE STRUGGLES AND TRANSNATIONAL ORGANIZING BY INFORMAL WORKERS

    GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES B: HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, Issue 2 2009
    Ilda Lindell
    ABSTRACT. This paper investigates the scalar practices of collectively organized informal workers and the political implications of such practices. It illustrates how the studied group organizes across scales , hence, a ,glocal movement', and stresses the importance of an analysis that integrates these multiple scales of collective organizing, as they may have a bearing on each other. In so doing, it contests a common tendency to analytically privilege one or other scale of resistance and agency. In particular, I argue that networking across scales may be of significance for local struggles and thus play a role in local politics. The transnational activities of the studied group assist it in challenging local power relations and dominant place projects that repress informal livelihood activities. This paper comprises a conceptual discussion of notions of scale, of conceptions of the spatialities and scales of resistance as well as of place, followed by an empirical illustration that refers to an association of informal vendors in Maputo, Mozambique, and its international connections. The analysis is based on interviews with vendors, leaders of the association and with the international partners of the association. [source]


    THEIR SPACE: SECURITY AND SERVICE WORKERS IN A BRAZILIAN GATED COMMUNITY,

    GEOGRAPHICAL REVIEW, Issue 4 2008
    JACQUELYN CHASE
    ABSTRACT. This study examines the role of service workers in creating a secure landscape in a zone of gated communities near Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Most research on gated communities emphasizes their segregation and formal security apparatuses. In fact, gated communities interact with surrounding rural settlements because they draw their service employees from them. Security emerges from informal relationships of trust that property owners establish with service workers. Gardeners, especially, enable homeowners to project their property investment to others through landscaping. Equally of importance, a manicured garden conveys the message that a home is receiving daily attention,and is secure,even if the owner is not present. The study probes this interdependence from the point of view of gardeners in the context of one gated community in an area south of Belo Horizonte and the attempts by members of its homeowners association to minimize the sense of fear they associate with the Brazilian city. [source]


    ORGANIZATIONAL AND OCCUPATIONAL COMMITMENT: KNOWLEDGE WORKERS IN LARGE CORPORATIONS*

    JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, Issue 6 2002
    TAM YEUK-MUI MAY
    Previous discussion of knowledge work and workers tends to overlook the importance of contextual knowledge in shaping the organizational form of knowledge workers who are employees in large corporations. This paper proposes a model to understand the way knowledge base and organizational form are related to the work commitment, effort and job satisfaction of knowledge workers. The model is derived from (1) a critical examination of the market model of knowledge work organization, and (2) the results of empirical research conducted in two large corporations. We argue that contextual knowledge is important in the relationships between the corporation and knowledge workers. A dualistic model and an enclave organizational form are suggested to examine the relationships between the commitment, work effort and job satisfaction of knowledge workers. We noted from our empirical cases that enclave-like work teams enhanced the expertise and job autonomy of knowledge workers vis-ā-vis management. These work teams together with the performance-based pay system, however, led to unmet job expectations including limited employee influence over decision-making and careers, and communication gaps with senior management. Under these circumstances, and in contrast to the impact of occupational commitment, organizational commitment did not contribute to work effort. The study highlights the importance of management's strategy in shaping the organizational form of knowledge work. The paper concludes by noting general implications of our study for the management of expertise and for further research. [source]


    HEALING LOSS, AMBIGUITY, AND TRAUMA: A COMMUNITY-BASED INTERVENTION WITH FAMILIES OF UNION WORKERS MISSING AFTER THE 9/11 ATTACK IN NEW YORK CITY

    JOURNAL OF MARITAL AND FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 4 2003
    Pauline Boss
    A team of therapists from Minnesota and New York workied with labor union families of workers gone missing on September 11, 2001, after the attack on the World Trade Center, where they were employed. The clinical team shares what they did, what was learned, the questions raised, and preliminary evaulations about the multiple family meeting that were the major intervention. Because of the vast diversity, training of therapists and interventions for families aimed for cultural competence. The community-based approach, preferred by union families, plus family therapy using the lens of ambiguous loss are proposed as necessary additions to disaster work. [source]


    CAPITALISTS, WORKERS AND SOCIAL SECURITY

    METROECONOMICA, Issue 2 2007
    Thomas R. Michl
    ABSTRACT This paper elaborates an exogenous growth model that nests overlapping generations of workers who save for life cycle reasons with dynastic agents who save for bequest reasons (,capitalists'). The model overcomes Marglin's objection that the overlapping generations framework requires special assumptions about technology, and it also provides a natural environment to revisit Samuelson's analysis of lump-sum transfers between generations. The ability of a benevolent planner to improve workers' welfare is severely restricted by the control capitalists exercise over the accumulation process. Prefunding social security assumes renewed significance because it overcomes this restriction. [source]


    WAGES, HOURS OF WORK AND JOB SATISFACTION OF RETIREMENT-AGE WORKERS,

    THE JAPANESE ECONOMIC REVIEW, Issue 2 2005
    ISAO OHASHI
    I analyse, theoretically and empirically, the effects of pension benefits, family conditions and the personal characteristics of older individuals on their labour supply, wages, hours worked and job satisfaction, in the framework of the Nash bargaining condition whereby an older worker and a firm bargain over employment conditions such as wages, hours of work and job investment. It is stressed that as workers become older they tend to give greater priority to the number of hours worked, work environment and type of job than to wages, and try to improve these through job investment, even at the cost of lower wages. [source]


    THE INFLUENCE OF VOLUNTEERS, DONATIONS AND PUBLIC SUBSIDIES ON THE WAGE LEVEL OF NONPROFIT WORKERS: EVIDENCE FROM AUSTRIAN MATCHED DATA

    ANNALS OF PUBLIC AND COOPERATIVE ECONOMICS, Issue 1 2010
    Astrid Haider
    ABSTRACT,:,In this article we add to the literature analyzing wages in the nonprofit sector by estimating a wage function based on employer-employee matched data for Austria. We concentrate on the influence of voluntary contributions on the wage level of paid workers. By using a quantile regression approach we find that the existence of volunteers reduces the wages of paid employees in nonprofit organizations. The number of volunteers does not have an influence on the wage level. Donations have a small but positive effect for higher income groups only. Public subsidies increase wages of all paid workers in a nonprofit organization. [source]


    AN ECONOMY ILL-SUITED TO YOUNGER WORKERS: CHILD AND YOUTH WORKFORCE PARTICIPATION IN COLONIAL QUEENSLAND, 1886,1901

    AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 2 2006
    Bradley Bowden
    child labour; demographic economics; history; labour demand; Queensland This article explores the extent and significance of child and youth work in late 19th century Australia. It demonstrates that, while demographic changes meant that almost half the population was aged 19 years or less, this age cohort never comprised more than 18 per cent of the recorded workforce. It is argued that this under-representation reflects the fact that children and youths were ill-suited to the work demands of most colonial occupations. They did not threaten the position of adult males in the key areas of the economy such as construction, heavy engineering, pastoral work, mining and transport. [source]


    ESTIMATING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN IMMIGRANT AND NATIVE WORKERS IN AUSTRALIA: A PRODUCTION THEORY APPROACH

    AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC PAPERS, Issue 1 2010
    JAAI PARASNIS
    The impact of immigration on labour markets depends, among other factors, on the substitutability or complementarity between immigrants and natives. This relationship is examined by treating migrant and native labour, along with capital, as inputs in production process. Estimated price elasticities of substitution between immigrants and native labour suggest that in Australian context, an increase in the wage rate of one group of workers leads to an increased demand for the other. The estimated elasticities of substitution between immigrant and native workers and the complementary relationship between immigrants and capital provide an insight into the complex effects of immigration. [source]


    DEVELOPING A CARDIAC REHABILITATION EDUCATION RESOURCE FOR RURAL HEALTH WORKERS IN QUEENSLAND: REVIEWING THE PROCESS AND OUTCOMES

    AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, Issue 1 2002
    Elizabeth Parker
    ABSTRACT: The provision of cardiac rehabilitation services to people living in rural and remote areas is often limited to the nearest large hospital situated in urban coastal centres, leaving a gap in the rehabilitation of cardiac patients. This paper discusses the development, composition and the results of a process evaluation of a cardiac rehabilitation education resource for rural health workers. The development of the structure and content of the manual were informed by a review of current rehabilitation literature, the results of focus groups with 60 rural health workers in five Queensland rural centres, and survey results of 135 rural cardiac patients admitted to five Queensland hospitals. The draft manual was trialled by health workers in seven rural centres throughout Queensland by the National Heart Foundation (Queensland Division). The results of the process evaluation provided valuable feedback on the efficacy of the manual as an educational resource for rural health workers in the cardiac rehabilitation of their patients. Specific content in the educational resource was strengthened as a result of this evaluation. The limitations of the evaluation and suggestions for its improvement are also discussed. The paper highlights the importance of this level of evaluation in the development of health promotion education resources. [source]


    FOSTERING HOPE IN PEOPLE LIVING WITH AIDS IN AFRICA: THE ROLE OF PRIMARY HEALTH-CARE WORKERS

    AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, Issue 4 2001
    Henry Abayomi Akinsola
    ABSTRACT: Today the medical literature is dominated by discussions on issues related to HIV/AIDS. This is not surprising considering the fact that in the history of humankind, the HIV/AIDS scenario has posed one of the greatest challenges. The reality of the physical, socioeconomic and psychological problems associated with the AIDS epidemic has become obvious to the general populace in Africa. Currently, both the AIDS victims and several others in the society continue to entertain the fear of dying from AIDS. The situation has become a source of concern to almost everyone, including primary health-care (PHC) workers. While several options are being examined to address the AIDS problem in Africa, one area that is often neglected is how to foster hope in people living with AIDS (PLWA) and their caregivers. In an attempt to examine this issue, this paper discusses the concept of hope, the cultural construct of HIV/AIDS in African countries and the role of PHC workers in fostering hope in PLWA. The paper concludes that by assisting the PLWA to develop a good sense of hope, PHC workers will be able to meet an important challenge: how to improve the quality of life for PLWA. [source]


    DEVELOPMENT OF ORAL HEALTH TRAINING FOR RURAL AND REMOTE ABORIGINAL HEALTH WORKERS

    AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, Issue 3 2001
    Tom Pacza
    Abstract: Research data exists that highlight the discrepancy between the medical/dental status experienced by Aboriginal people compared with that of their non-Aboriginal counterparts. This, coupled with a health system that Aboriginal people often find alienating and difficult to access, further exacerbates the many health problems they face. Poor oral health and hygiene is an issue often overlooked that can significantly impact on a person's quality of life. In areas where Aboriginal people find access to health services difficult, the implementation of culturally acceptable forms of primary health care confers significant benefits. The Aboriginal community has seen that the employment and training of Aboriginal health workers (AHW), particularly in rural and remote regions, is significantly beneficial in improving general health. In the present study, an oral health training program was developed and trialed. This training program was tailored to the needs of rural and remote AHWs. The primary objective was to institute a culturally appropriate basic preventative oral health delivery program at a community level. It is envisaged that through this dental training program, AHWs will be encouraged to implement long-term preventive measures at a local level to improve community dental health. They will also be encouraged to pursue other oral health-care delivery programs. Additionally, it is considered that this project will serve to strengthen a trust-based relationship between Aboriginal people and the health-care profession. [source]


    From Scientific Apprentice to Multi-skilled Knowledge Worker: changes in Ph.D education in the Nordic-Baltic Area

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF EDUCATION, Issue 3 2007
    ANDREAS ÖNNERFORS
    There is no doubt that what is generally referred to as ,Ph.D education' has undergone dramatic changes in Europe in recent years. Whereas the Bologna Process, launched in 1999, originally had in mind to make it easier for undergraduate students to gain international experience and enhance their employability by facilitating mobility and transparency of higher education in Europe, the idea of a ,third cycle' of doctoral studies came relatively late in the discussion (2003). For some academic cultures, the idea of educating doctoral students was and still is perceived as a threat against academic freedom, originality and credibility. Other academic cultures have already long adopted Ph.D training schemes as an integrated part of training future scientists and knowledge workers. This article presents the result of a recent survey on Ph.D training in the Nordic-Baltic Area (Andreas Önnerfors: ,Ph.D-training/PGT in the Nordic-Baltic Area', Exploring the North: papers in Scandinavian Culture and Society 2006:1, Lund 2006) initiated by the Nordic research organisation NordForsk, which discusses new concepts of doctoral education and training in the five Nordic and the three Baltic countries as well as in Russia, Poland and three northern states of the Federal Republic of Germany. Whereas there is great correspondence in the performance of doctoral training and education in the Nordic countries and changes have been introduced permanently for about 30 years, Poland, Germany and Russia are battling with their academic traditions and the challenge of adapting their academic cultures to joint European standards. This concerns especially the phenomenon of two postgraduate degrees (the Ph.D and a further degree) and the view upon training elements in doctoral studies. After their independence, the three Baltic countries rapidly adapted their systems of higher education to the Nordic model. [source]


    Get Back into that Kitchen, Woman: Management Conferences and the Making of the Female Professional Worker

    GENDER, WORK & ORGANISATION, Issue 5 2010
    Jackie Ford
    Conferences are a little studied aspect of working lives. In this article we explore how management conferences contribute to the continuing imbalance of power between men and women in management. We analyse data gathered from a reflexive ethnographic study of a management conference. We show that women arrive at conferences as knowing subjects, able easily to occupy the subject position of conference participant, but they are then subjected to processes of infantilization and seduction. They are made to feel scared and are given the order, as were their mothers and grandmothers: get back to the kitchen. We avoid using a theoretical explanation for these findings, preferring to offer them without much explanation, for we favour instead a political approach, and we use the findings as a way of making a call to arms to change the ways in which conferences are hostile to women. [source]


    A collaborative approach to embedding graduate primary care mental health workers in the UK National Health Service

    HEALTH & SOCIAL CARE IN THE COMMUNITY, Issue 5 2008
    Janine Fletcher MSc
    Abstract The UK National Health Service (NHS) workforce has recently seen the arrival of the Graduate Mental Health Worker (GMHW) in primary care. We established a Quality Improvement Collaborative to assist in embedding this new workforce in one Strategic Health Authority Area of England. The intervention utilised ,collaborative' technology which involves bringing together groups of practitioners from different organizations to work in a structured way to improve the quality of their service. The process was evaluated by an action research project in which all stakeholders participated. Data collection was primarily qualitative. During the project, there was an increase in throughput of new patients seen by the GMHWs and increased workforce satisfaction with a sense that the collaborative aided the change process within the organizations. Involvement of managers and commissioners from the Primary Care Trusts where the GMHWs were employed appeared to be important in achieving change. This was not, however, sufficient to combat significant attrition of the first cohort of workers. The project identified several barriers to the successful implementation of a new workforce for mental health problems in primary care, including widespread variation in the level and quality of supervision and in payment and terms of service of workers. A collaborative approach can be used to support the development of new roles in health care; however, full engagement from management is particularly necessary for success in implementation. The problems faced by GMHWs reflect those faced by other new workers in healthcare settings, yet in some ways are even more disturbing given the lack of governance arrangements put in place to oversee these developments and the apparent use of relatively unsupported and inexperienced novices as agents of change in the NHS. [source]


    Lay food and health worker involvement in community nutrition and dietetics in England: definitions from the field

    JOURNAL OF HUMAN NUTRITION & DIETETICS, Issue 3 2008
    L. A. Kennedy
    Abstract Background, Community-based food initiatives have developed in recent years with the aim of engaging previously ,hard to reach' groups. Lay workers engaged in community nutrition activities are promoted as a cost-effective mechanism for reaching underserved groups. The primary objective of the study was to explore perceptions and definitions of lay helping within the context of National Health Service (NHS) community nutrition and dietetic services to identify existing terms and definitions and propose an overarching term. Methods, Interpretive qualitative inquiry; semi-structured interviews with lay food and health worker (LFHW) and NHS professionals employed by community-based programmes, serving ,hard-to-reach' neighbourhoods, across England. Results, In total, 29 professionals and 53 LFHWs were interviewed across 15 of the 18 projects identified. Across all the projects, there was a preference for the use of one of two terms, either Community Food Worker or Community Nutrition Assistant, in reference to lay workers. There was no consensus in terms of a unifying term or definition for this new role. Conclusions, Current variation in the terms and definitions used for this role is problematic and is hindering development and effective utilization of lay helping within the broad remit of community food and health and dietetics. The umbrella term ,Lay Food and Health Worker' is proposed based upon definitions and interpretations from the field. [source]


    The role of second health professionals under New Zealand mental health legislation

    JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC & MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 3 2006
    A. J. O'BRIEN rgn rpn ba mphil
    The development of generic statutory roles in mental health care has been the subject of discussion by New Zealand nurses for the past decade. One such role is that of second health professional in judicial reviews of civil commitment. Issues identified by New Zealand nurses have also been raised in England, where it seems that nurses are likely to assume the role of Approved Mental Health Worker under English mental health law. A survey of mental health nurses found that few had received any preparation for the role of second health professional and 45% did not feel adequately prepared for the role. Some of these issues are reflected in a New Zealand inquiry which resulted in the Ministry of Health developing a written report form for second health professionals. However, the form has the potential to reduce the mental health nursing role to a narrow legal role. Statutory roles such as that of second health professional challenge mental health nurses to critically reflect on the conceptual and ethical basis of their practice. While traditional concepts such as therapeutic relationships and advocacy need to be reviewed in light of these changes, nurses need to be vigilant in articulating the moral and clinical basis of their roles. The development of guidelines for he second health professional role is suggested as a way of supporting clinical practice in this area. [source]


    Worker flows, job flows and firm wage policies

    THE ECONOMICS OF TRANSITION, Issue 2 2003
    An analysis of Slovenia
    Abstract Like many transition economies, Slovenia is undergoing profound changes in the workings of the labour market with potentially greater flexibility in terms of both wage and employment adjustment. To investigate the impact of these changes, we use unique longitudinal matched employer-employee data that permits measurement of employment transitions and wages for workers and enables links of the workers to the firms in which they are employed. We can thus measure worker flows and job flows in a comprehensive and integrated manner. We find a high pace of job flows in Slovenia especially for young, small, private and foreign-owned firms and for young, less educated workers. While job flows have approached the rates observed in developed market economies, the excess of worker flows above job flows is lower than that observed in market economies. A key factor in the patterns of the worker and job flows is the determination of wages in Slovenia. A base wage schedule provides strict guidelines for minimum wages for different skill categories. However, firms are permitted to offer higher wages to an individual based upon the success of the worker and/or the firm. Our analysis shows that firms deviate from the base wage schedule significantly and that the idiosyncratic wage policies of firms are closely related to the observed pattern of worker and job flows at the firm. Firms with more flexible wages (measured as less compression of wages within the firm) have less employment instability and are also able to improve the match quality of their workers. JEL Classifications: J23, J31, J41, J61, P23, P31. [source]


    An African -American Worker in Stalin's Soviet Union: Race and the Soviet Experiment in International Perspective1

    THE HISTORIAN, Issue 1 2009
    Barbara Keys
    First page of article [source]


    "We have a little bit more finesse, as a nation": Constructing the Polish Worker in London's Building Sites

    ANTIPODE, Issue 3 2009
    Ayona Datta
    Abstract:, This paper examines how male Polish builders in London construct themselves relationally to English builders as they negotiate their place within the labour hierarchies of the building site and in the London labour market. This is based on semi-structured interviews and participant photographs taken by Polish migrants arriving in the aftermath of the European Union expansion in May 2004, and now working in building sites across London. These buildings sites are mundane elements of a global city which employ transnational labour, and where differences between Polish and English builders become significant discursive tools of survival in a competitive labour market. The paper illustrates how Polish workers mark themselves as "superior" to English builders through the versatility of their embodied skills, work ethic, artistic qualities, and finesse in their social interactions on the building site. This paper thus provides new ways of understanding the meanings of work and the complexity of identity politics within the spaces of low-paid manual work in a global city. [source]


    What Makes a Good CAMHS Primary Mental Health Worker?

    CHILD AND ADOLESCENT MENTAL HEALTH, Issue 1 2009
    Sally Bradley
    Background:, The role of primary mental health worker (PMHW) in CAMHS was established in 1995 although comparatively little research has explored the attributes required to successfully undertake this role. Method:, Qualitative interviews with PMHWs and staff working in primary care were conducted and thematic analysis was performed. Results:, In addition to clinical skills and mental health knowledge all respondents consistently emphasised the importance of inter-personal attributes such as general accessibility, flexibility, and self-motivation. Conclusions:, Both professional competencies and inter-personal skills are perceived as important characteristics for PMHWs. It therefore seems appropriate for these to be made more explicit in competency frameworks. [source]


    From Insurrectionary Worker to Contingent Citizen: restructuring labor markets and repositioning East Rand (South Africa) retail sector workers

    CITY & SOCIETY, Issue 1 2003
    Bridget Kenny
    Cities in South Africa, engineered as they were through apartheid, have fundamentally defined experiences of work, residence, leisure, and collective organization of urban and rural dwellers alike. Within the distinctive spaces of urban centers, citizens encounter the more recent difficulties of global economic restructuring as well as the potential to create their own opposition to increased marginalization. Using workplace interviews and life histories conducted from 1998-2000 of retail sector workers on the East Rand, South Africa, this paper focuses on the changing "local labor market." From a focal point of an organized, democratic union movement linked to community anti-apartheid struggles, more recently the region has undergone de-industrialization exacerbated by increasing "flexibilized" service employment and directed investment to other centers, like Johannesburg's rapidly developing north. The article explores how East Rand worker-residents experience an increasingly contingent labor market through shifting identities as workers and as men and women. [South Africa, retail industry, East Rand, deindustrialization, labor markets, gender, globalization] [source]


    Lay food and health worker involvement in community nutrition and dietetics in England: definitions from the field

    JOURNAL OF HUMAN NUTRITION & DIETETICS, Issue 3 2008
    L. A. Kennedy
    Abstract Background, Community-based food initiatives have developed in recent years with the aim of engaging previously ,hard to reach' groups. Lay workers engaged in community nutrition activities are promoted as a cost-effective mechanism for reaching underserved groups. The primary objective of the study was to explore perceptions and definitions of lay helping within the context of National Health Service (NHS) community nutrition and dietetic services to identify existing terms and definitions and propose an overarching term. Methods, Interpretive qualitative inquiry; semi-structured interviews with lay food and health worker (LFHW) and NHS professionals employed by community-based programmes, serving ,hard-to-reach' neighbourhoods, across England. Results, In total, 29 professionals and 53 LFHWs were interviewed across 15 of the 18 projects identified. Across all the projects, there was a preference for the use of one of two terms, either Community Food Worker or Community Nutrition Assistant, in reference to lay workers. There was no consensus in terms of a unifying term or definition for this new role. Conclusions, Current variation in the terms and definitions used for this role is problematic and is hindering development and effective utilization of lay helping within the broad remit of community food and health and dietetics. The umbrella term ,Lay Food and Health Worker' is proposed based upon definitions and interpretations from the field. [source]


    Peace through Health: The Role of Health Workers in Preventing Emergency Care Needs

    ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 12 2006
    Mark Davis MD
    First page of article [source]


    Occupational immunologic contact urticaria from pine processionary caterpillar (Thaumetopoea pityocampa): experience in 30 cases

    CONTACT DERMATITIS, Issue 2 2004
    Jesús Vega
    Cutaneous lesions caused by the pine processionary caterpillar Thaumetopoea pityocampa (TP) are frequent in pinewood areas. In the present study, 30 patients diagnosed with occupational immunologic urticaria from this caterpillar were included. Immediate hypersensitivity was demonstrated by performing prick and IgE-immunoblotting tests. Workers were grouped according to their common tasks. Occupations at risk of exposure to TP were pine-cone collectors/woodcutters (14), farmers/stockbreeders (8), other forestry personnel (4), construction workers (2), residential gardeners (1) and entomologists (1). Besides contact urticaria, angioedema (60%), papular lesions of several days of evolution (30%) and anaphylactic reactions (40%) were also detected. The most frequently detected molecular weight bands by immunoblot were 15 (70%), 17 (57%) and 13 kDa (50%). The appearance of isolated bands corresponds with the least serious cases. Only 8 subjects had bands higher than 33 kDa, which was present in the 3 most severe cases of anaphylactic reactions. By presenting these cases, we wish to offer the largest series reported so far of occupational immunologic contact urticaria caused by TP. We include the first cases described in certain occupations, some of them not directly related to forestry work. Pine-cone or resin collectors, woodcutters, farmers and stockbreeders were the most frequently and severely affected workers. [source]