Wood Flour Content (wood + flour_content)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Wood/plastic composites co-extruded with multi-walled carbon nanotube-filled rigid poly(vinyl chloride) cap layer

POLYMER INTERNATIONAL, Issue 5 2010
Shan Jin
Abstract Wood/plastic composites (WPCs) can absorb moisture in a humid environment due to the hydrophilic nature of the wood in the composites, making products susceptible to microbial growth and loss of mechanical properties. Co-extruding a poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC)-rich cap layer on a WPC significantly reduces the moisture uptake rate, increases the flexural strength but, most importantly, decreases the flexural modulus compared to uncapped WPCs. A two-level factorial design was used to develop regression models evaluating the statistical effects of material compositions and a processing condition on the flexural properties of co-extruded rigid PVC/wood flour composites with the ultimate goal of producing co-extruded composites with better flexural properties than uncapped WPCs. Material composition variables included wood flour content in the core layer and carbon nanotube (CNT) content in the cap layer of the co-extruded composites, with the processing temperature profile for the core layer as the only processing condition variable. Fusion tests were carried out to understand the effects of the material compositions and processing condition on the flexural properties. Regression models indicated all main effects and two powerful interaction effects (processing temperature/wood flour content and wood flour content/CNT content interactions) as statistically significant. Factors leading to a fast fusion of the PVC/wood flour composites in the core layer, i.e. low wood flour content and high processing temperature, were effective material composition and processing condition parameters for improving the flexural properties of co-extruded composites. Reinforcing the cap layer with CNTs also produced a significant improvement in the flexural properties of the co-extruded composites, insensitive to the core layer composition and the processing temperature condition. Copyright 2009 Society of Chemical Industry [source]


Fusion characteristics of rigid PVC/wood-flour composites by torque rheometry

JOURNAL OF VINYL & ADDITIVE TECHNOLOGY, Issue 1 2007
Laurent M. Matuana
This study was aimed at examining the effects of wood flour contents, wood species (softwood vs. hardwood), and particle size on the fusion characteristics (fusion time, fusion temperature, fusion torque, and fusion energy) of rigid PVC/wood-flour composites in a torque rheometer. Neat rigid PVC exhibited one fusion peak, whereas the addition of wood flour into the PVC matrix led to two fusion peaks. Increased wood flour content caused a significant increase in the time, temperature, and energy at which fusion between the primary particles started, thereby leading to increased fusion torque, irrespective of the wood flour species. These results implied that rigid PVC filled with wood flour must be processed at higher temperatures than neat resin. Although fusion characteristics of the composites were influenced by the wood species, a clear trend between softwood and hardwood species could not be established. However, finer particles fused more quickly and needed less energy than coarse ones. J. VINYL ADDIT. TECHNOL., 13:7,13, 2007. 2007 Society of Plastics Engineers. [source]


Wood/plastic composites co-extruded with multi-walled carbon nanotube-filled rigid poly(vinyl chloride) cap layer

POLYMER INTERNATIONAL, Issue 5 2010
Shan Jin
Abstract Wood/plastic composites (WPCs) can absorb moisture in a humid environment due to the hydrophilic nature of the wood in the composites, making products susceptible to microbial growth and loss of mechanical properties. Co-extruding a poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC)-rich cap layer on a WPC significantly reduces the moisture uptake rate, increases the flexural strength but, most importantly, decreases the flexural modulus compared to uncapped WPCs. A two-level factorial design was used to develop regression models evaluating the statistical effects of material compositions and a processing condition on the flexural properties of co-extruded rigid PVC/wood flour composites with the ultimate goal of producing co-extruded composites with better flexural properties than uncapped WPCs. Material composition variables included wood flour content in the core layer and carbon nanotube (CNT) content in the cap layer of the co-extruded composites, with the processing temperature profile for the core layer as the only processing condition variable. Fusion tests were carried out to understand the effects of the material compositions and processing condition on the flexural properties. Regression models indicated all main effects and two powerful interaction effects (processing temperature/wood flour content and wood flour content/CNT content interactions) as statistically significant. Factors leading to a fast fusion of the PVC/wood flour composites in the core layer, i.e. low wood flour content and high processing temperature, were effective material composition and processing condition parameters for improving the flexural properties of co-extruded composites. Reinforcing the cap layer with CNTs also produced a significant improvement in the flexural properties of the co-extruded composites, insensitive to the core layer composition and the processing temperature condition. Copyright 2009 Society of Chemical Industry [source]


Fusion characteristics of rigid PVC/wood-flour composites by torque rheometry

JOURNAL OF VINYL & ADDITIVE TECHNOLOGY, Issue 1 2007
Laurent M. Matuana
This study was aimed at examining the effects of wood flour contents, wood species (softwood vs. hardwood), and particle size on the fusion characteristics (fusion time, fusion temperature, fusion torque, and fusion energy) of rigid PVC/wood-flour composites in a torque rheometer. Neat rigid PVC exhibited one fusion peak, whereas the addition of wood flour into the PVC matrix led to two fusion peaks. Increased wood flour content caused a significant increase in the time, temperature, and energy at which fusion between the primary particles started, thereby leading to increased fusion torque, irrespective of the wood flour species. These results implied that rigid PVC filled with wood flour must be processed at higher temperatures than neat resin. Although fusion characteristics of the composites were influenced by the wood species, a clear trend between softwood and hardwood species could not be established. However, finer particles fused more quickly and needed less energy than coarse ones. J. VINYL ADDIT. TECHNOL., 13:7,13, 2007. 2007 Society of Plastics Engineers. [source]