Violence Victimization (violence + victimization)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Mothers' Violence Victimization and Child Behavior Problems: Examining the Link

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, Issue 2 2007
Richard Thompson PhD
The current study examined the link between parents' experience of violence victimization and child outcomes, in 197 mother-child dyads recruited from low-income urban neighborhoods. At recruitment (when children were between 6 and 18 months old), demographic factors, child behavioral outcomes, mother-child interactions, mothers' psychosocial functioning, and mothers' history of violence victimization were assessed. Child behavioral outcomes, mother-child interactions, and mothers' psychosocial functioning were assessed again at age 4. Mothers' history of victimization as children (but not as adults) uniquely predicted child behavior problems at age 4. Three classes of possible mediators were examined: demographics, maternal psychosocial functioning, and mother-child interactions. Of these, only mother psychological aggression toward child met preliminary criteria for mediation; it partially mediated the link between mother childhood victimization and child behavioral outcomes. Maternal depressive symptoms and young age at child's birth independently predicted child behavior problems, but did not act as mediators. Mothers' early experiences with violence victimization appear to exert an important influence on child behavioral outcomes; this influence appears to be mediated, in part, by mothers' psychological aggression toward their children. [source]


Aggressive behavior in response to violence exposure: is it adaptive for middle-school children?,

JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 8 2008
Suzanne Salzinger
The role of aggression in adaptation to family and community violence was examined in a sample of 667 inner-city schoolchildren studied annually over three years in middle school. Regression analyses indicated that the association between Year 1 exposure to family and community violence and Year 2 aggression was mediated by aggression occurring contemporaneously with Year 1 exposure. Cognitive justification of aggression and friends' delinquency made small independent contributions to prediction of Year 2 aggression, delinquency, and externalizing behaviors. Year 2 aggression mediated the association between Year 1 community violence victimization and Year 3 negative adaptation (internalizing problems, anxiety, and depression). Year 2 aggression also mediated the negative association between Year 1 witnessing community violence and Year 3 positive adaptation (self-esteem). Cognitive justification of aggression and friends' delinquency made independent contributions to Year 3 negative adaptation. The pattern of relations among variables infrequently varied by gender. Implications for intervention are discussed. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Partner Violence and Mental Health Outcomes in a New Zealand Birth Cohort

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 5 2005
David M. Fergusson
This study examines the prevalence and extent of domestic violence and the consequences of domestic violence for mental health outcomes in a birth cohort of New Zealand young adults studied at age 25 years. A total of 828 young people (437 women and 391 men) were interviewed about the domestic violence victimization and violence perpetration in their current or most recent partner relationship. Key findings of the study were (a) domestic conflict was present in 70% of relationships, with this conflict ranging from minor psychological abuse to severe assault; (b) men and women reported similar experiences of victimization and perpetration of domestic violence; and (c) exposure to domestic violence was significantly related to increased risks of major depression (p < .05) and suicidal ideation (p < .005) even after extensive control for covariates. [source]


Mothers' Violence Victimization and Child Behavior Problems: Examining the Link

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, Issue 2 2007
Richard Thompson PhD
The current study examined the link between parents' experience of violence victimization and child outcomes, in 197 mother-child dyads recruited from low-income urban neighborhoods. At recruitment (when children were between 6 and 18 months old), demographic factors, child behavioral outcomes, mother-child interactions, mothers' psychosocial functioning, and mothers' history of violence victimization were assessed. Child behavioral outcomes, mother-child interactions, and mothers' psychosocial functioning were assessed again at age 4. Mothers' history of victimization as children (but not as adults) uniquely predicted child behavior problems at age 4. Three classes of possible mediators were examined: demographics, maternal psychosocial functioning, and mother-child interactions. Of these, only mother psychological aggression toward child met preliminary criteria for mediation; it partially mediated the link between mother childhood victimization and child behavioral outcomes. Maternal depressive symptoms and young age at child's birth independently predicted child behavior problems, but did not act as mediators. Mothers' early experiences with violence victimization appear to exert an important influence on child behavioral outcomes; this influence appears to be mediated, in part, by mothers' psychological aggression toward their children. [source]


Violence Prevention in the Emergency Department: Future Research Priorities

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 11 2009
Debra Houry MD
Abstract The 2009 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference working group session participants developed recommendations and research questions for violence prevention in the emergency department (ED). A writing group devised a working draft prior to the meeting and presented this to the breakout session at the consensus conference for input and approval. The recommendations include: 1) promote and facilitate the collection of standardized information related to violence victimization and perpetration in ED settings; 2) develop and validate brief practical screening instruments that can identify those at risk for perpetration of violence toward others or toward self; 3) develop and validate brief practical screening instruments that can identify victims at risk for violent reinjury and mental health sequelae; and 4) conduct efficacy, translational, and dissemination research on interventions for violence prevention. The work group emphasized the critical need and role of ED-based research to impact surveillance and prevention of future violence-related injury. [source]