Violence Prevention (violence + prevention)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Dating Violence Prevention in Middle School and High School Youth

JOURNAL OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, Issue 1 2005
Sharron M. Close MS
TOPIC:, Dating violence and interpersonal abuse among middle school and high school students. PURPOSE:, To review the current literature and evaluate the need of conducting further study in order to create early interventions for the prevention of relationship abuse. SOURCES USED:, Case report and review of the literature. CONCLUSIONS:, Dating violence among middle school and high school youth must be addressed by screening risk and offering anticipatory guidance during each health maintenance visit in order to prevent victimization of youth in dating and attraction relationships. [source]


Violence Prevention in the Emergency Department: Future Research Priorities

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 11 2009
Debra Houry MD
Abstract The 2009 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference working group session participants developed recommendations and research questions for violence prevention in the emergency department (ED). A writing group devised a working draft prior to the meeting and presented this to the breakout session at the consensus conference for input and approval. The recommendations include: 1) promote and facilitate the collection of standardized information related to violence victimization and perpetration in ED settings; 2) develop and validate brief practical screening instruments that can identify those at risk for perpetration of violence toward others or toward self; 3) develop and validate brief practical screening instruments that can identify victims at risk for violent reinjury and mental health sequelae; and 4) conduct efficacy, translational, and dissemination research on interventions for violence prevention. The work group emphasized the critical need and role of ED-based research to impact surveillance and prevention of future violence-related injury. [source]


THE AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION ADDRESSES THE NATIONAL PROBLEM OF YOUTH AT RISK

FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 3 2007
Karen J. Mathis
During the 2006,2007 American Bar Association (ABA) year, a special ABA Presidential Youth at Risk Initiative has addressed several important topics: addressing the needs of juvenile status offenders and their families; foster children aging out of the foster care system; increases in girls, especially girls of color, in the juvenile justice system; the need to better hear the voices of youth in court proceedings affecting them; and improving how laws can better address youth crossing over between juvenile justice and child welfare systems. Lawyers are encouraged to use their skills to improve the systems addressing at-risk youth and their families and to help facilitate coordination of youth-related community efforts. Learning how to effectively communicate with youth is an important skill attorneys must learn. Through the Youth at Risk Initiative, the ABA has held continuing legal education programs, hosted community roundtables among youth-serving stakeholders, and developed projects on: juvenile status offenders; lawyer assistance to youth transitioning from foster care; educating young girls on violence prevention, conflict resolution, and careers in law and justice; and provision of useful information to youth awaiting juvenile court hearings. New ABA policy has addressed services and programs to at-risk youth, assuring licensing, regulation, and monitoring of residential facilities serving at-risk youth, enhanced support for sexual minority foster and homeless youth, juvenile status offenders, and improving laws and policies related to youth exiting the foster care system. [source]


Family violence prevention programs in immigrant communities: perspectives of immigrant men

JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 7 2008
Louise Simbandumwe
The Strengthening Families in Canada Family Violence Prevention Project was aimed at engaging immigrant and refugee communities in family violence prevention. The project, which received support from the Community Mobilization Program, National Crime Prevention Strategy, involved a partnership of four community health and education organizations. The project had three streams: women's, youth, and men's. The women's and youth streams were composed of educational sessions on violence prevention. The third stream consisted of a qualitative research project examining immigrant and refugee men's views of family violence and their suggestions for prevention education. The authors present findings from this research and offer suggestions for future implementation of prevention programming for immigrant and refugee families. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Sexual violence prevention through bystander education: An experimental evaluation

JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 4 2007
Victoria L. Banyard
The current study used an experimental design to evaluate a sexual violence prevention program based on a community of responsibility model that teaches women and men how to intervene safely and effectively in cases of sexual violence before, during, and after incidents with strangers, acquaintances, or friends. It approaches both women and men as potential bystanders or witnesses to behaviors related to sexual violence. Three hundred and eighty-nine undergraduates participated and were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups or a control group. Results from the research reveal that up to 2 months after participating in either a one- or three-session version of the program, participants in the treatment conditions showed improvements across measures of attitudes, knowledge, and behavior while the control group did not. Most program effects persisted at 4- and 12-month follow-ups. The program appeared to benefit both women and men. Implications and future directions for research are discussed. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comm Psychol 35: 463,481, 2007. [source]


Staff survey results and characteristics that predict assault and injury to personnel working in mental health facilities

AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR, Issue 1 2003
Julie Cunningham
Abstract The purpose of this study was to complete a mental health staff opinion survey to identify patient and staff characteristics associated with staff assault and injury in psychiatric treatment settings and to develop a model of prediction for staff assault and injury utilizing these survey variables. The data consisted of opinion surveys sent to staff of 15 child, adolescent, and adult psychiatry inpatient units in the United States. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the level of assault and staff-reported injury prediction that could be obtained from the staff-completed opinion survey. Responses indicated a high prevalence of reported aggression, with 62.3% of staff endorsing verbal and physical aggression, property destruction, and self-injurious behavior as being prevalent at their site, whereas only 4.1% rated none of these as prevalent. Staff working with children and adolescents in settings with high rates of psychiatric diagnoses reported increased frequency of assault and injury compared with those working with adults. Younger, less experienced staff reported higher rates of assault and injury. Staff working with female patients reported similar rates of assault and injury to those working with males. A logistic regression analysis using staff-reported survey results of both staff and patient characteristics predicted assault correctly 73.7% of the time and injury 66.1% of the time. Resources for violence prevention and staff training programs in violence prevention are needed in child and adolescent psychiatry wards. Results are consistent with theories emphasizing the importance of negative emotions and affects, impulsivity, and frustration in goal-directed activities in human aggression. Aggr. Behav. 29:31,40, 2003. 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Adolescent Dating Violence: Prevalence, Risk Factors, Health Outcomes, and Implications for Clinical Practice

JOURNAL OF OBSTETRIC, GYNECOLOGIC & NEONATAL NURSING, Issue 2 2003
Nancy Glass PhD, RN assistant professor
The goal of this synthesis is to provide a comprehensive assessment of the literature associated with dating violence in adolescence. Previous research findings on the prevalence, risk factors associated with victimization and perpetration, and potential health outcomes of dating violence are discussed. The importance of designing developmentally and culturally competent dating violence prevention and intervention strategies in the clinical setting is emphasized. This review is intended to assist health care professionals to develop interventions in their clinical settings to prevent and reduce adolescent dating violence. [source]


Participation in Policy Streams: Testing the Separation of Problems and Solutions in Subnational Policy Systems

POLICY STUDIES JOURNAL, Issue 2 2010
Scott E. Robinson
The multiple streams theory of national policymaking has been influential in the study of public administration and public policy,if not without a fair bit of controversy. While some laud the model for its openness to the important role of policy entrepreneurs and the irrationalities of the decision-making processes, others criticize the model for its lack of readily testable propositions. This article identifies a series of testable propositions in the multiple streams model (particularly that discussed by Kingdon). We assess whether participation in local policymaking (focusing on school district policymaking related to violence prevention) is characterized by "separate streams" of participants or is dominated by organized participants like interest groups or policy specialists. We found evidence of unity (rather than separation) in the policymaking process and scant evidence of elite, organized interests dominating the policymaking process. The results call into question a key assumption of the multiple streams model. [source]


Violence Prevention in the Emergency Department: Future Research Priorities

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 11 2009
Debra Houry MD
Abstract The 2009 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference working group session participants developed recommendations and research questions for violence prevention in the emergency department (ED). A writing group devised a working draft prior to the meeting and presented this to the breakout session at the consensus conference for input and approval. The recommendations include: 1) promote and facilitate the collection of standardized information related to violence victimization and perpetration in ED settings; 2) develop and validate brief practical screening instruments that can identify those at risk for perpetration of violence toward others or toward self; 3) develop and validate brief practical screening instruments that can identify victims at risk for violent reinjury and mental health sequelae; and 4) conduct efficacy, translational, and dissemination research on interventions for violence prevention. The work group emphasized the critical need and role of ED-based research to impact surveillance and prevention of future violence-related injury. [source]


Community-based Participatory Research: Development of an Emergency Department,based Youth Violence Intervention Using Concept Mapping

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 8 2010
Carolyn E. Snider MD, FRCPC
ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE 2010; 17:1,9 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Abstract Objectives:, Emergency departments (EDs) see a high number of youths injured by violence. In Ontario, the most common cause of injury for youths visiting EDs is assault. Secondary prevention strategies using the teachable moment (i.e., events that can lead individuals to make positive changes in their lives) are ideal for use by clinicians. An opportunity exists to take advantage of the teachable moment in the ED in an effort to prevent future occurrences of injury in at-risk youths. However, little is known about perceptions of youths, parents, and community organizations about such interventions in EDs. The aims of this study were to engage youths, parents, and frontline community workers in conceptualizing a hospital-based violence prevention intervention and to identify outcomes relevant to the community. Methods:, Concept mapping is an innovative, mixed-method research approach. It combines structured qualitative processes such as brainstorming and group sorting, with various statistical analyses such as multidimensional scaling and hierarchical clustering, to develop a conceptual framework, and allows for an objective presentation of qualitative data. Concept mapping involves multiple structured steps: 1) brainstorming, 2) sorting, 3) rating, and 4) interpretation. For this study, the first three steps occurred online, and the fourth step occurred during a community meeting. Results:, Over 90 participants were involved, including youths, parents, and community youth workers. A two-dimensional point map was created and clusters formed to create a visual display of participant ideas on an ED-based youth violence prevention intervention. Issues related to youth violence prevention that were rated of highest importance and most realistic for hospital involvement included mentorship, the development of youth support groups in the hospital, training doctors and nurses to ask questions about the violent event, and treating youth with respect. Small-group discussions on the various clusters developed job descriptions, a list of essential services, and suggestions on ways to create a more youth-friendly environment in the hospital. A large-group discussion revealed outcomes that participants felt should be measured to determine the success of an intervention program. Conclusions:, This study has been the springboard for the development of an ED-based youth violence intervention that is supported by the community and affected youth. Using information generated by youth that is grounded in their experience through participatory research methods is feasible for the development of successful and meaningful youth violence prevention interventions. [source]