Vehicle Incidents (vehicle + incident)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Vehicle Incidents

  • motor vehicle incident


  • Selected Abstracts


    Can First Responders Be Sent to Selected 9-1-1 Emergency Medical Services Calls without an Ambulance?

    ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 4 2003
    Craig B. Key MD
    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of initially dispatching only first responders (FRs) to selected low-risk 9-1-1 requests for emergency medical services. First responders are rapidly-responding fire crews on apparatus without transport capabilities, with firefighters trained to at least a FR level and in most cases to the basic emergency medical technician (EMT) level. Low-risk 9-1-1 requests include automatic medical alerts (ALERTs), motor vehicle incidents (MVIs) for which the caller was unable to answer any medical dispatch questions designed to prioritize the call, and 9-1-1 call disconnects (D/Cs). Methods: A before-and-after study of patient dispositions was conducted using historical controls for comparison. During the historical control phase of six months, one year prior to the study phase, basic life support ambulances (staffed with two basic EMTs) were dispatched to selected low-risk 9-1-1 incidents. During the six-month study phase, a fire FR crew equipped with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) was sent initially without an ambulance to these incidents. Results: For ALERTs (n= 290 in historical group vs. 330 in study group), there was no statistical difference in the transport rate (7% vs 10%), but there was a statistically significant increase in the follow-up use of advanced life support (ALS) (1% vs 4%, p = 0.009). No patient in the ALERTs historical group required airway management, while one patient in the study group received endotracheal intubation. No patient required defibrillation in either group. Analysis of the MVIs showed a significant decrease (p < 0.0001) in the patient transport rate from 39% of controls to 33% of study patients, but no change in the follow-up use of ALS interventions (2% for each group). For both the ALERTs and MVIs, the FR's mean response time was faster than ambulances (p < 0.0001). Among the 9-1-1 D/Cs with FRs only (n= 1,028), 15% were transported and 43 (4%) received subsequent ALS care. Four of these patients (0.4%) received intubation and two (0.2%) required defibrillation. However, no patient was judged to have had adverse outcomes as a result of the dispatch protocol change. Conclusions: Fire apparatus crews trained in the use of AEDs can safely be used to initially respond alone (without ambulances) to selected, low-risk 9-1-1 calls. This tactic improves response intervals while reducing ambulance responses to these incidents. [source]


    Eleven years of occupational mortality in law enforcement: The census of fatal occupational injuries, 1992,2002,

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE, Issue 9 2010
    Hope M. Tiesman PhD
    Abstract Background Occupational injury deaths remain high for Law Enforcement Officers (LEOs). This study describes and compares intentional and transportation-related fatality rates in US LEOs between 1992 and 2002. Methods Workplace injury deaths among LEOs from 1992 to 2002 were categorized into "Intentional," "Transportation-related," and "Other," using the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries. Occupations included in this analysis were sheriffs and bailiffs, police and detectives, non-public service guards, and correctional officers. Fatality rates were compared among law enforcement occupations, cause of death, and demographics with rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results During the 11-year period, 2,280 workers died from an occupational injury, for a fatality rate of 11.8 per 100,000 across all LEO occupations. Forty-seven percent were homicides (n,=,1,072, rate 5.6 per 100,000), 36% transportation-related (n,=,815, rate 4.2 per 100,000), 11% were due to other causes (n,=,249, rate 1.3 per 100,000), and 5% were workplace suicides (n,=,122, rate 0.6 per 100,000). The proportion of fatalities by cause of death differed significantly between occupations (P,<,0.0001). Sheriffs and bailiffs experience a high risk for occupational injury death compared to other law enforcement occupations. Of the transportation-related fatalities, LEOs were operating a motor-vehicle in 58% of the incidents and 22% of the fatalities were struck by incidents. Conclusions Transportation-related deaths were nearly as common as homicides as a cause of occupational injury death among US LEOs. Struck by vehicle incidents remain an important and overlooked cause of death. This research points to opportunities for the prevention of transportation-related deaths in law enforcement. Am. J. Ind. Med. 53:940,949, 2010. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


    Risk factors for serious injury in Finnish agriculture

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE, Issue 5 2009
    Risto H. Rautiainen PhD
    Abstract Background Previous studies indicate 20% of injuries represent 80% of injury costs in agriculture. To help prevent the most costly injuries, we aimed to identify characteristics and risk factors associated with serious injuries. Methods We analyzed insurance records of 93,550 self-employed Finnish farmers. We ranked injury causes by claim cost and used multiple logistic regressions to identify risk factors for (any) injury and serious injury (injuries exceeding claim costs of ,2000). Results A total of 5,507 compensated injuries occurred in 2002 (rate 5.9/100 person-years), and 1,167 or 21% of them (rate 1.25/100 person-years) were serious. The causes/sources resulting in highest average claim costs were motor vehicles; stairs, scaffoldings, and ladders; trailers and wagons; floors, walkways, and steps; other structures and obstacles; augers, mills, and grain handling equipment; horses; combines and harvesting equipment; tractor steps; and uneven and slippery terrain. Older age, male gender, higher income level, greater field size, residing on the farm, Finnish language (vs. Swedish), occupational health service (OHS) membership, and animal production were risk factors for injury. The risk factors for serious injury were similar; however, the effects of age, income level, and the raising of horses were more prominent. Language, residence, ownership status, and OHS membership were not risk factors for serious injury. Conclusions Cost-effective prevention efforts should address the following risk factors: older age, male gender, larger income and operation size, livestock production (particularly dairy, swine, and horses), motor vehicle incidents, falls from elevation, and slips, trips and falls. Am. J. Ind. Med. 52:419,428, 2009. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


    Farm-related fatal injury of young and older adults in Australia, 1989,1992

    AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, Issue 4 2002
    Rebecca J. Mitchell
    Abstract: This paper describes the types of, and circumstances surrounding, unintentional farm-related fatal injuries involving young and older adults in Australia. Information was obtained from an inspection of coronial files for the period 1989,1992. Around 14% of all farm-related fatalities in Australia during 1989,1992 were of young adults aged 15,24 years and approximately one-quarter were of older adults aged , 55 years. Young adults were commonly fatally injured in motor vehicle incidents and in incidents involving firearms. Tractors were the most common agent involved in fatal incidents involving older adults. Intervention measures to prevent fatalities of older adults in agriculture should focus on the safe use of tractors, while for young adults it appears prevention efforts should centre around safe use of firearms and operation of motor vehicles on the farm. Ways to overcome barriers to the use of injury prevention measures in rural Australia should be further explored. [source]


    FARM-RELATED FATAL INJURY OF YOUNG AND OLDER ADULTS IN AUSTRALIA, 1989,1992

    AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, Issue 4 2002
    Rebecca J. Mitchell
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the types of, and circumstances surrounding, unintentional farm-related fatal injuries involving young and older adults in Australia. Information was obtained from an inspection of coronial files for the period 1989,1992. Around 14% of all farm-related fatalities in Australia during 1989,1992 were of young adults aged 15,24 years and approximately one-quarter were of older adults aged? 55 years. Young adults were commonly fatally injured in motor vehicle incidents and in incidents involving firearms. Tractors were the most common agent involved in fatal incidents involving older adults. Intervention measures to prevent fatalities of older adults in agriculture should focus on the safe use of tractors, while for young adults it appears prevention efforts should centre around safe use of firearms and operation of motor vehicles on the farm. Ways to overcome barriers to the use of injury prevention measures in rural Australia should be further explored. [source]