Vaginal Misoprostol (vaginal + misoprostol)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Vaginal misoprostol for cervical priming before dilatation and curettage in postmenopausal women: A randomized controlled trial

JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY RESEARCH (ELECTRONIC), Issue 3 2004
Soysuwan Bunnasathiansri
Abstract Aim: To investigate the efficacy of vaginal misoprostol for cervical priming before dilatation and curettage in postmenopausal women. Methods: Forty-four postmenopausal women with indication for dilatation and curettage were randomly assigned to receive either 400 g of misoprostol or placebo vaginally 6 h before dilatation and curettage. The main outcome measures were the number of women who required cervical dilatation, cervical width, time taken to dilate to Hegar 6 and other complications. Results: The mean cervical diameter (4.59 millimeters in the misoprostol group vs 4.41 millimeters in the placebo group) was comparable between the two groups. A similar number of women in the misoprostol group and in the placebo group required cervical dilatation (12 vs 16, P = 0.35). The operative times for both groups were similar. The incidence of side-effects was comparable in both groups. There were two uterine perforations in the misoprostol group (2 vs 0). Conclusion: There was no significant benefit from applying 400 g vaginal misoprostol 6 h prior to dilatation and curettage in postmenopausal women. [source]


Sublingual versus vaginal misoprostol for the management of missed abortion

JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY RESEARCH (ELECTRONIC), Issue 3 2010
Fateme Davari Tanha
Abstract Aim:, To evaluate the efficacy of two routes of misoprostol administration (sublingual and vaginal) for the treatment of missed abortion. Methods:, Two hundred and twenty women with confirmed missed abortion who received 400 g/6 h misoprostol either sublingually or vaginally, were included in this randomized control trial. All women were admitted to hospital for follow-up care for 2 days. If the pregnancy was not completely evacuated during this time, the patient underwent immediate surgical completion. Efficacy was defined as the percentage of women discharged from the study without the need for surgical intervention. Results:, The effectiveness was high in the sublingual group and statistically different (sublingual 84.5%, vaginal 46.4% P = 0.000 RR = 0.54 95%CI = 0.442,0.681). The groups differed in terms of complications like bleeding (88.2% vs 65.5%), pain (85.5% vs 56.4%), diarrhea (69.1% vs 36.4%) and fever (23.6% vs 13.3%) in the sublingual group versus the vaginal group, but the mean time to expulsion was shorter (9.68 h SD = 5.51 95%CI = 8.61,10.57) in the sublingual group than the vaginal group (16.64 h SD = 14.01 95%CI = 13.8,19.48), P = 0.000. Women in the sublingual group were highly satisfied with the method. Conclusion:, Sublingual misoprostol for the medical management of missed abortion is more effective and more acceptable than the vaginal route. However, it showed more adverse effects. [source]


Randomized comparison of dry tablet insertion versus gel form of vaginal misoprostol for second trimester pregnancy termination

JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY RESEARCH (ELECTRONIC), Issue 2 2008
Saipin Pongsatha
Abstract Aim:, To compare the effectiveness of vaginal misoprostol between dry tablet insertion and gel form for second trimester pregnancy termination. Methods:, A non-blinded block randomized controlled trial was conducted on 148 pregnant women with live fetuses in the second trimester undergoing pregnancy termination. They were randomly allocated to receive vaginal misoprostol (400 ,g) either dry tablet insertion (n = 72) or gel form (n = 76). The same dose was then repeated every 3 h if adequate uterine contraction was not achieved until 48 h after the initiation of misoprostol. If abortion did not occur within this period, the treatment was considered a failure and other technique of termination was then given based on the decision of the attending physicians and the cervical status. Results:, The mean induction,abortion interval in group 1 (20.9 12.3 h) was not significantly different from that in group 2 (17.7 10.2 h). The mean total dose of misoprostol was also not significantly different between the two groups (group 1, 1556.9 ,g; group 2, 1350.9 ,g), but the adverse effects of misoprostol (chill and diarrhoea) were more common in the gel group. Conclusion:, Tablet insertion or gel form of vaginal misoprostol have similar effectiveness but the gel form was associated with more common adverse effects. [source]


Vaginal misoprostol for cervical priming before dilatation and curettage in postmenopausal women: A randomized controlled trial

JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY RESEARCH (ELECTRONIC), Issue 3 2004
Soysuwan Bunnasathiansri
Abstract Aim: To investigate the efficacy of vaginal misoprostol for cervical priming before dilatation and curettage in postmenopausal women. Methods: Forty-four postmenopausal women with indication for dilatation and curettage were randomly assigned to receive either 400 g of misoprostol or placebo vaginally 6 h before dilatation and curettage. The main outcome measures were the number of women who required cervical dilatation, cervical width, time taken to dilate to Hegar 6 and other complications. Results: The mean cervical diameter (4.59 millimeters in the misoprostol group vs 4.41 millimeters in the placebo group) was comparable between the two groups. A similar number of women in the misoprostol group and in the placebo group required cervical dilatation (12 vs 16, P = 0.35). The operative times for both groups were similar. The incidence of side-effects was comparable in both groups. There were two uterine perforations in the misoprostol group (2 vs 0). Conclusion: There was no significant benefit from applying 400 g vaginal misoprostol 6 h prior to dilatation and curettage in postmenopausal women. [source]


Author response to: Comparison of self-administered vaginal misoprostol versus placebo for cervical ripening prior to operative hysteroscopy using a sequential trial design

BJOG : AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 9 2008
KS Oppegaard
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Comparison of self-administered vaginal misoprostol versus placebo for cervical ripening prior to operative hysteroscopy using a sequential trial design

BJOG : AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 9 2008
D Tsivos
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Comparison of self-administered vaginal misoprostol versus placebo for cervical ripening prior to operative hysteroscopy using a sequential trial design,

BJOG : AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 5 2008
KS Oppegaard
Objective, To compare the impact of 1000 micrograms of self-administered vaginal misoprostol versus self-administered vaginal placebo at home on preoperative cervical ripening in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women before operative hysteroscopy. Design, Two separate but identical parallel, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled sequential trials, one in premenopausal women and one in postmenopausal women. The boundaries for the sequential trials were calculated on the primary outcomes of a difference of cervical dilatation ,1 mm, with the assumption of a type 1 error of 0.05 and a power of 0.95. Setting, Norwegian university teaching hospital. Sample, Eighty-six women referred to outpatient operative hysteroscopy. Methods, The women were randomised to either 1000 micrograms of self-administered vaginal misoprostol or self-administered vaginal placebo the evening before outpatient operative hysteroscopy. Main outcome measures, Preoperative cervical dilatation (primary outcome), number of women who achieve a preoperative cervical dilatation ,5 mm, acceptability, complications and adverse effects (secondary outcomes). Results, In premenopausal women, the mean cervical dilatation was 6.4 mm (SD 2.4) in the misoprostol group and 4.8 mm (SD 2.0) in the placebo group, the mean difference in cervical dilatation being 1.6 mm (95% CI 0.5,2.7). Among the premenopausal women receiving misoprostol, 88% achieved a cervical dilatation of ,5 mm compared with 65% in the placebo group. Twelve percent of the women who received misoprostol were difficult to dilate compared with 32% who received placebo. Dilatation was also quicker in the misoprostol group. Misoprostol had no effect on cervical ripening in postmenopausal women compared with placebo, and 43% of the women were difficult to dilate. The trials were terminated after analysis of 21 postmenopausal women and 65 premenopausal women after reaching a conclusion on the primary outcome with only 28% of the number of women needed in a fixed sample size trial. Three of 45 women who received misoprostol experienced severe lower abdominal pain, and there was an increased occurrence of light preoperative bleeding in the misoprostol group. Most women did not experience misoprostol-related adverse effects. The majority (83% of premenopausal and 76% of postmenopausal women) found self-administered vaginal misoprostol at home to be acceptable. There were two serious complications in the premenopausal misoprostol group: uterine perforation with subsequent peritonitis and heavy postoperative bleeding requiring blood transfusion, but these were not judged to be misoprostol related. Complications were otherwise comparatively minor and distributed equally between the two dosage groups. Conclusions, One thousand micrograms of self-administered vaginal misoprostol 12 hours prior to operative hysteroscopy has a significant cervical ripening effect compared with placebo in premenopausal but not in postmenopausal women. Self-administered vaginal misoprostol of 1000 micrograms at home the evening before operative hysteroscopy is safe and highly acceptable, although a small proportion of women experienced severe lower abdominal pain. There is a risk of lower abdominal pain and light preoperative bleeding with this regimen, which is very cheap and easy to use. [source]


Comparison of self-administered vaginal misoprostol versus placebo for cervical ripening prior to operative hysteroscopy using a sequential trial design,

BJOG : AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 6 2007
KS Oppegaard
Objective, To compare the impact of 1000-microgram self-administered vaginal misoprostol versus self-administered vaginal placebo at home on preoperative cervical ripening in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women prior to outpatient resectoscopy. Design, Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled sequential trial. Setting, Norwegian university teaching hospital. Sample, Premenopausal and postmenopausal women referred to outpatient resectoscopy. Methods, The women were randomised to either 1000 micrograms of self-administered vaginal misoprostol or self-administered vaginal placebo the evening before outpatient resectoscopy. Main outcome measures, Preoperative cervical dilatation, acceptability and complications. Results, (a) Intraoperative findings and distribution of cervical dilatation in the two treatment groups. Values are given as median (range) or n (%). (b) Acceptability in the two treatment groups. Values are given as completely acceptable, n (%); fairly acceptable, n (%); fairly unacceptable, n (%) and completely unacceptable, n (%). (c) Pain in the two treatment groups. Pain was measured with a visual analogue scale score, scale ranges from 0 (no pain) to 10 (unbearable pain). Values are given as median (range). (d) Occurrence of adverse effects in the two treatment groups. Values are given as n (%). (e) Complications, given as n (%). [source]


Randomised controlled trial comparing the efficacy of same-day administration of mifepristone and misoprostol for termination of pregnancy with the standard 36 to 48 hour protocol

BJOG : AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 2 2007
J Guest
Objective, To determine the efficacy of oral mifepristone followed by vaginal misoprostol 6 hours later compared with the standard 36- to 48-hour regimen for medical termination of pregnancy. Design, Single centre, two arm, parallel, open randomised controlled trial. Setting, Medical termination service at a teaching hospital. Sample, Four hundred and fifty women undergoing medical termination of pregnancy at up to 63 days of gestation. Methods, Eligible women were randomised to receive mifepristone 200 mg orally followed by vaginal misoprostol 800 micrograms either 6 hours (n= 225) or 36,48 hours (n= 225) later. All participants were invited to attend for a follow-up pelvic ultrasound scan within 7 days following the misoprostol administration. For those women in whom products of conception remained at the follow-up ultrasound scan, expectant management ensued with weekly follow-up ultrasound scans until the termination was complete. They could elect to undergo an evacuation of uterus at any stage following the scan. Those women with a nonviable gestation sac at the follow-up scan were offered a further dose of vaginal misoprostol 800 micrograms or suction termination of pregnancy. Women with a continuing pregnancy were managed with surgical termination. Main outcome measure, Successful medical abortion defined as no requirement for medical or surgical intervention beyond the initial dose of misoprostol. Results, One hundred and sixty-five women (79%) in the 6-hour group and 197 women (92%) in the 36- to 48-hour group had a successful termination at first follow-up ultrasound or presumed on the basis of other considerations (those not seen for ultrasound but deemed successful by negative pregnancy test, products passed on ward or long-term assessment of notes). Twenty-two women (10%) in the 6-hour regimen required up to three further ultrasound scans after 7 days following the mifepristone administration in order to ensure that the termination process was complete. None of these women required a suction evacuation of uterus. In the 36- to 48-hour regimen, ten (5%) women had up to two further ultrasound scans to confirm a complete termination without the need for a surgical evacuation of uterus. Therefore, the overall successful termination rate in the 6-hour regimen was 89% (187/210) compared with 96% (207/215) in the 36- to 48-hour regimen (relative risk = 0.92, 95% CI 0.84,0.98). Repeat administration of misoprostol or surgical treatment was required in 23 women (11%) in the 6-hour group and 8 women (4%) in the 36- to 48-hour group. A viable pregnancy was found in five women (2%) in the 6-hour group and in three women (1%) in the 36- to 48-hour group. Conclusions, Oral mifepristone 200 mg followed by vaginal misoprostol 800 micrograms after 6 hours is not as effective at achieving a complete abortion compared with the 36- to 48-hour protocol. [source]


Fertility control: Oral versus self-administered vaginal misoprostol at home before surgical termination of pregnancy: a randomised controlled trial

BJOG : AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 1 2006
Kevin Sunde Oppegaard
Objective, To compare the impact of 400 ,g oral versus self-administered vaginal misoprostol at home on pre-operative cervical priming in both primigravid and multigravid women prior to first trimester surgical abortion. Design, Randomised controlled trial. Setting, Norwegian University Teaching Hospital. Sample, Three hundred and thirty-eight women undergoing surgical abortion between 7 and 12 weeks of gestation. Methods, The women were randomised to either 400 ,g of oral misoprostol the evening before or 400-,g of self-administered vaginal misoprostol at home the same day as vacuum aspiration. Main outcome measures, Pre-operative cervical dilatation, complications and acceptability. Results, The median cervical dilatation was 6.2 mm (range 0,11 mm) for the women in the 400 ,g oral misoprostol and 6.5 mm (range 0,11 mm) in the 400-,g vaginal misoprostol groups. The median pre-operative dilatation was larger in multigravidae (6.4 and 6.7 mm for the oral and vaginal routes, respectively) than in primigravidae (5.8 and 6.0 mm, respectively). In primigravidae, 19% achieved a pre-operative dilatation of ,7 mm, with no significant difference between oral and vaginal dosage. In multigravidae, 52% achieved a pre-operative dilatation of ,7 mm with vaginal dosage, compared with 36% with oral dosage (P= 0.03). There was no difference between non-immigrant versus immigrant women in pre-operative cervical dilatation. The 400-,g oral dosage group had a higher risk of bleeding, compared with the group receiving 400-,g vaginal misoprostol [odds ratio (OR) = 10.4; confidence interval (CI) 5.2,20.8]. There was no difference between non-immigrant and immigrant women in acceptability of self-administered vaginal misoprostol; almost all women found this administration route acceptable. Complications were minor and were distributed equally between the two dosage groups. Conclusions, The vaginal route will result in a satisfactory dilatation in about half of multigravidae but is much less effective in primigravidae. The oral route does not lead to satisfactory dilatation in either group and is associated with a higher occurrence of pre-operative bleeding. Self-administered vaginal misoprostol at home is highly acceptable. [source]


A randomised controlled trial of 6 and 12 hourly administration of vaginal misoprostol for second trimester pregnancy termination

BJOG : AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 9 2005
Yongyoth Herabutya
Objective To compare the effectiveness of vaginal misoprostol administered 6 or 12 hourly for second trimester pregnancy termination. Design A randomised controlled trial. Setting University teaching hospital. Sample Two hundred and seventy-nine pregnant women at gestations between 14 and 26 weeks undergoing pregnancy termination. Methods Women were randomised to receive 600-,g misoprostol tablets vaginally either every 6 hours or every 12 hours until abortion occurred. Main outcome measures Induction,abortion interval, success rate within 24 and 48 hours and adverse effects. Results There was no significant difference in the median induction to abortion interval 6 hours (16 hours) and 12 hours (16 hours; P= 0.80). The total dose of misoprostol was higher in the 6-hour group (1800 vs 1200 ,g). The cumulative abortion rates within 24 hours were 74% and 67% and within 48 hours 94% and 92%, in the 6- and 12-hour groups, respectively. Fever was more common in the 6-hour group (53%) versus the 12-hour group (31%; P < 0.001). The incidence of nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, severe bleeding and abdominal pain were similar. Conclusions Misoprostol (600 ,g) administered at 12-hour intervals was associated with fewer adverse effects and was as effective as a 6-hour interval. [source]