Uterine Artery Embolization (uterine + artery_embolization)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Uterine Artery Embolization

  • bilateral uterine artery embolization


  • Selected Abstracts


    Successful management of uterine arteriovenous malformation by ligation of feeding artery after unsuccessful uterine artery embolization

    JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY RESEARCH (ELECTRONIC), Issue 1 2009
    Daisaku Yokomine
    Abstract Uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a rare and potentially life-threatening disease. The present report describes a postmenopausal patient with uterine AVM manifesting recurrent, massive genital bleeding. Uterine artery embolization (UAE) was scheduled before hysterectomy, but UAE was unsuccessful due to the dilated, tortuous internal iliac arteries, and extremely rapid arterial blood flow. Hysterectomy appeared to carry a potential risk of massive blood loss due to multiple dilated vessels around the uterine corpus and cervix. Therefore, six arteries feeding the uterus were surgically ligated. At 10 months after the operation there have been no episodes of atypical genital bleeding. [source]


    Ectopic pregnancy in a cesarean section scar treated with intramuscular methotrexate and bilateral uterine artery embolization

    JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ULTRASOUND, Issue 2 2008
    Erin L. Hois BSc
    Abstract We report a case of an ectopic pregnancy implanted in the myometrium at the site of a scar from a previous cesarean section that presented with vaginal bleeding and was successfully treated with bilateral uterine artery embolization and intramuscular administration of methotrexate. The combination of minimally invasive interventional techniques and medical therapies can preserve fertility. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound, 2008 [source]


    Transvaginal sonographic appearance of thrombosed uterine arteries after uterine artery embolization: the "White Snake" sign

    JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ULTRASOUND, Issue 8 2003
    Iftikhar Ahmad MD
    Abstract Purpose The aim of this prospective study was to describe the appearance of thrombosed uterine arteries on transvaginal sonography performed after uterine artery embolization (UAE) and to assess the prognostic value of the "white snake" sign with regard to symptomatic outcome at 12 months. Methods Patients who underwent UAE from January 1, 1999, to July 31, 2000, for the treatment of symptomatic leiomyomas were included in the study. Transvaginal sonography was performed before and at 3, 6, and 12 months after UAE. Patients graded the severity of their symptoms on a scale from 1 to 5, with 1 being the least and 5 the most severe, before and at 12 months after the procedure. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to determine correlations between severity of symptoms and presence of the white snake sign; a p value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results During the study period, UAE was performed in 19 patients with a mean age of 41 years (range, 32,48 years). UAE was technically successful in all patients. Eighteen patients (95%) reported symptomatic improvement at 12 months: 8 patients (42%) by 4 severity-scale points, 5(26%) by 3 points, and 5 (26%) by 2 points. The 1 patient who did not experience improvement had undergone a hysterectomy at 4 months after the UAE. At the 3-month follow-up, transvaginal sonography demonstrated a tortuous echogenic structure in the adnexa (the white snake sign) in all patients; the finding was still apparent in 10 patients at 6 months but in only 2 patients at 12 months. A direct correlation was found between persistence of the white snake sign and the degree of symptomatic improvement at 6 months (p = 0.04) but not at 12 months (p = 0.08). Conclusions After UAE, a thrombosed uterine artery appears on transvaginal sonography as an echogenic tortuous structure in the adnexa. Persistence of this white snake sign at 6 months after UAE may suggest a more favorable symptomatic outcome. 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 31:401,406, 2003 [source]


    Successful management of uterine arteriovenous malformation by ligation of feeding artery after unsuccessful uterine artery embolization

    JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY RESEARCH (ELECTRONIC), Issue 1 2009
    Daisaku Yokomine
    Abstract Uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a rare and potentially life-threatening disease. The present report describes a postmenopausal patient with uterine AVM manifesting recurrent, massive genital bleeding. Uterine artery embolization (UAE) was scheduled before hysterectomy, but UAE was unsuccessful due to the dilated, tortuous internal iliac arteries, and extremely rapid arterial blood flow. Hysterectomy appeared to carry a potential risk of massive blood loss due to multiple dilated vessels around the uterine corpus and cervix. Therefore, six arteries feeding the uterus were surgically ligated. At 10 months after the operation there have been no episodes of atypical genital bleeding. [source]


    Near-fatal uterine hemorrhage during induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia: A case report of bilateral uterine artery embolization

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEMATOLOGY, Issue 2 2004
    John T. Phelan II
    Abstract Severe transfusion-dependent uterine hemorrhage is a relatively uncommon complication of induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Even less common is the failure of systemic conjugated estrogens in this setting. We report a case of life-threatening uterine hemorrhage in a 38-year-old woman in the setting of transfusion-refractory thrombocytopenia after completing induction chemotherapy for AML. She experienced dramatic breakthrough uterine hemorrhage despite multiple platelet transfusions, conjugated estrogens, recombinant factor VIIa, ,-aminocaproic acid, and intracavitary thrombin-soaked gauze tamponade. At the point of near-exsanguination in the setting of hypotension, hematocrit of 14%, and a platelet count of 3,000/,L, she underwent bilateral uterine artery embolization which proved immediately successful. We review the literature and indications for this procedure in the oncologic patient care setting. Am. J. Hematol. 77:151,155, 2004. 2004 Wiley-Liss Inc. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]