Use Planning (use + planning)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Use Planning

  • land use planning


  • Selected Abstracts


    LAND USE PLANNING: PUBLIC OR PRIVATE CHOICE?

    ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, Issue 2 2003
    Mark Pennington
    Focusing on house prices and residential densities, this paper offers a comparative institutions account of the likely performance of public and private land use planning regimes. The analysis suggests that whilst far from ,perfect,' a system of private land use planning is likely to offer a more effective way of balancing the costs and benefits of land use change than a government-driven system. [source]


    Connecting EIA to environmental management systems: lessons from industrial estate developments in England

    CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, Issue 2 2007
    Paul Slinn
    Abstract This paper concerns the relationship between environmental assessment and environmental management systems in the context of recent industrial estate developments. Drawing on environmental statements and interviews with developers, an examination was carried out of the level of good practice in estate design and operation, and the way in which this was influenced by environmental impact assessment and environmental management systems. The study concludes that the environmental impact assessment system worked well within the context of land use planning, but that it failed to facilitate the planning of effective environmental management in practice, with the consequence that the projects examined failed to meet many of the good practice criteria against which they were tested. Finally, several recommendations are made to strengthen continuity between the two. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment. [source]


    LAND USE PLANNING: PUBLIC OR PRIVATE CHOICE?

    ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, Issue 2 2003
    Mark Pennington
    Focusing on house prices and residential densities, this paper offers a comparative institutions account of the likely performance of public and private land use planning regimes. The analysis suggests that whilst far from ,perfect,' a system of private land use planning is likely to offer a more effective way of balancing the costs and benefits of land use change than a government-driven system. [source]


    Using geographic information to identify environmental resources: A tool for land use planning

    ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT, Issue 1 2006
    A. Gharagozlou
    First page of article [source]


    Application of multicriteria decision analysis in environmental decision making

    INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT, Issue 2 2005
    Gregory A. Kiker
    Abstract Decision making in environmental projects can be complex and seemingly intractable, principally because of the inherent trade-offs between sociopolitical, environmental, ecological, and economic factors. The selection of appropriate remedial and abatement strategies for contaminated sites, land use planning, and regulatory processes often involves multiple additional criteria such as the distribution of costs and benefits, environmental impacts for different populations, safety, ecological risk, or human values. Some of these criteria cannot be easily condensed into a monetary value, partly because environmental concerns often involve ethical and moral principles that may not be related to any economic use or value. Furthermore, even if it were possible to aggregate multiple criteria rankings into a common unit, this approach would not always be desirable because the ability to track conflicting stakeholder preferences may be lost in the process. Consequently, selecting from among many different alternatives often involves making trade-offs that fail to satisfy 1 or more stakeholder groups. Nevertheless, considerable research in the area of multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) has made available practical methods for applying scientific decision theoretical approaches to complex multicriteria problems. This paper presents a review of the available literature and provides recommendations for applying MCDA techniques in environmental projects. A generalized framework for decision analysis is proposed to highlight the fundamental ingredients for more structured and tractable environmental decision making. [source]


    Evaluating land use/land cover changes and fragmentation in the Camili forest planning unit of northeastern Turkey from 1972 to 2005

    LAND DEGRADATION AND DEVELOPMENT, Issue 4 2007
    F. Sivrikaya
    Abstract Changes in land use/land cover have important consequences on the management of natural resources including soil and water quality, global climatic systems and biodiversity. This study analysed the spatial and temporal pattern of land use/land cover change in the Camili forest planning unit that includes the Camili Biosphere Reserve Area within the Caucasian hotspot, in the northeast corner of Turkey. To assess the patterns during a 33-year period, the necessary data were obtained from forest stand maps and evaluated with Geographic Information Systems and FRAGSTATS. Results showed that the total forested areas increased from 19,9465,ha (786% of the study area) in 1972 to 20,7973,ha (819 per cent) in 2005 with a slight net increase of 851,ha. Softwood cover types (4118,ha) completely transitioned to other cover types over 33-year period. In terms of spatial configuration, the total number of forest fragments increased from 172 to 608, and mean size of forest patch (MPS) decreased from 1477,ha to 418,ha during the period. Nearly 84 per cent of the patches in 1972 and 93 per cent of them in 2005 generally seem to concentrate into 0,100,ha patch size class, indicating more fragmented landscape over time that might create a risk for the maintenance of biodiversity of the area. There were apparent trends in the temporal structure of forest landscape, some of which may issue from mismanagement of the area, social conflict, and illegal utilization of forest resources due to ineffective forest protection measurements. The study revealed that it is important to understand both spatial and temporal changes of land use/land cover and their effects on landscape pattern to disclose the implications for land use planning and management. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]