Urinary Function (urinary + function)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The Effect of Comorbidity and Socioeconomic Status on Sexual and Urinary Function and on General Health-Related Quality of Life in Men Treated with Radical Prostatectomy for Localized Prostate Cancer

THE JOURNAL OF SEXUAL MEDICINE, Issue 4 2008
Pierre I. Karakiewicz MD
ABSTRACT Introduction., Different treatments for localized prostate cancer (PCa) may be associated with similar overall survival but may demonstrate important differences in health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Therefore, valid interpretation of cancer control outcomes requires adjustment for HRQOL. Aim., To assess the effect of comorbidity and socioeconomic status (SES) on sexual and urinary function as well as general HRQOL in men treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) for PCa. Methods., We sent a self-addressed mail survey, composed of the research and development short form 36-item health survey, the PCa-specific University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Prostate Cancer Index (PCI), as well as a battery of items addressing SES and lifetime prevalence of comorbidity, to 4,546 men treated with RP in Quebec between 1988 and 1996. Main Outcome Measures., The association between comorbidity, SES, and HRQOL was tested and quantified using univariable and multivariable linear regression models. Results., Survey responses from 2,415 participants demonstrated that comorbidity and SES are strongly related to sexual, urinary, and general HRQOL in univariable and multivariable analyses. In multivariable models, the presence of comorbid conditions was associated with significantly worse HRQOL, as evidenced by lower scale scores by as much as 17/100 points in general domains, and by as much as 10/100 points in PCa-specific domains. Favorable SES characteristics were related to higher general (up to 9/100 points) and higher PCa-specific (up to 8/100 points) HRQOL scale scores. Conclusions., Comorbidity and SES are strongly associated with sexual, urinary and general HRQOL. Karakiewicz PI, Bhojani N, Neugut A, Shariat SF, Jeldres C, Graefen M, Perrotte P, Peloquin F, and Kattan MW. The effect of comorbidity and socioeconomic status on sexual and urinary function and on general health-related quality of life in men treated with radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. J Sex Med 2008;5:919,927. [source]


Prostate cancer treatment options (observation versus prostatectomy) , the available evidence

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF UROLOGICAL NURSING, Issue 3 2007
Josephine Hegarty
Abstract Advanced screening programmes have led to an increased incidence of prostate cancer worldwide. Prostate Cancer is currently the most common site of male cancers worldwide; accounting for 21% of all male cancers in Ireland. This article presents an in-depth review of the available evidence (January 1997 to April 2007), which directly compares outcomes (in terms of urinary function, bowel function, sexual function, quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes and survival statistics) post radical prostatectomy versus a conservative watch-and-wait approach for the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer. The aim of this paper is to equip health-care professionals with the best available research evidence. Best research evidence is a component of evidence-based practice, which is very much ,in vogue' in health care today. The authors recommend that practitioners utilize this, the available evidence in combination with their clinical expertise and their patients' opinions in order to assist these patients' to make wise and informed treatment decisions. As this paper will demonstrate, the treatment chosen can have important implications in terms of patient outcomes. Therefore, making an informed decision early on can prevent any regret at a later stage. Overall this review of the literature revealed significant disparity in terms of which treatment option is more favourable. Patients overall are faced with a difficult dilemma when making this treatment decision , to live longer at the expense of potential erectile dysfunction and possible urinary incontinence or to live for a potentially shorter time without these adverse consequences. [source]


Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Risk of Developing Urinary Incontinence

JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 11 2005
Karen L. Lifford MD
Objectives: To evaluate the association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and development of urinary incontinence in women. Design: Prospective, observational study. Setting: The Nurses' Health Study cohort. Participants: Eighty-one thousand eight hundred forty-five women who reported information on urinary function in 1996. Measurements: Self-reported, physician-diagnosed DM was ascertained using questionnaire from 1976 to 1996 and confirmed using standard criteria. Self-reported urinary incontinence, defined as leakage at least weekly, was ascertained in 1996 and 2000. Logistic regression models were used to calculate multivariate-adjusted relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the relationship between DM (as of 1996) and prevalent and incident incontinence. Results: The risk of prevalent incontinence (multivariate RR=1.28, 95% CI=1.18,1.39) and incident incontinence (multivariate RR=1.21, 95% CI=1.02,1.43) was significantly greater in women with DM than women without. Using a validated severity index, risk of developing severe incontinence was even more substantial in women with DM than in those without (multivariate RR=1.40, 95% CI=1.15,1.71 for leakage enough to wet the underwear; RR=1.97, 95% CI=1.24,3.12 for leakage enough to wet the outer clothing). In addition, risk of incontinence increased with duration of DM (P -trend=.03 for prevalent incontinence; P=.001 for incident incontinence). Conclusion: DM independently increases risk of urinary incontinence in women. Because risk of incontinence appeared associated with longer duration of DM, even delaying the onset of DM could have important public health implications. [source]


Effects of postoperative analgesia on postpartum urinary retention in women undergoing cesarean delivery

JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY RESEARCH (ELECTRONIC), Issue 5 2010
Ching-Chung Liang
Abstract Aim:, Various analgesics and administration methods are used to provide women undergoing cesarean delivery pain relief after surgery. We compared three methods of postoperative analgesia regarding the incidence of postpartum urinary retention (PUR) in primiparous women undergoing elective cesarean delivery. Methods:, We estimated post-void residual bladder volume after the first postpartum micturition among 150 parturient women. Risk factors stratified for PUR defined by 150-mL post-void residual bladder volume were analyzed. Obstetric parameters and prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms after surgery were compared among three groups of parturient women given different postoperative analgesia: epidural bolus morphine (EBM), patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) with ropivacaine-fentanyl, and intramuscular pethidine. Results:, The incidence of PUR was higher in the group given EBM (33.3%) than the groups receiving ropivacaine-fentanyl by PCEA (15%) or intramuscular pethidine (16.7%) (P = 0.038). Eighteen (12%) parturient women needed bladder catheterization to resolve their urinary retention at 1 day postpartum but all achieved spontaneous micturition prior to hospital discharge. The need for catheterization was also increased in the group with EBM (21.7%) in comparison with the other two groups (6.7% and 3.3%, respectively, P = 0.011). At the 3-month follow up, six women (4%) had obstructive voiding problems and seven women (4.7%) had irritating voiding problems. At the 1-year follow up, only one woman in the EBM group had incomplete emptying and another in the PCEA group had urinary incontinence. Conclusion:, Epidural analgesia with morphine was significantly associated with post-cesarean urinary retention. Nonetheless, it was not detrimental to later urinary function. [source]


Urethropexy for the management of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence in the bitch

JOURNAL OF SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE, Issue 10 2001
R. N. White
Urethropexy was performed on 100 bitches for the management of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence (SMI). The dogs ranged in age from 12 months to nine years (mean 4,5 years). Diagnosis of the condition was based upon clinical, laboratory and contrast radiographic examinations, and clinical response to medical management. In all bitches, incontinence developed in the adult individual and in the majority (89 bitches) after spaying. Radiographic findings were unremarkable in 22 bitches, apart from the presence of an intrapelvic bladder neck. Follow-up periods ranged from 12 months to seven years (mean 2,9 years). Fifty-six bitches were completely cured by surgery, 27 became less incontinent and 17 either failed to respond (nine animals) or showed an initial improvement in urinary function, but then relapsed (eight animals). Nine of these 17 animals underwent a second urethropexy procedure, resulting in a cure in six and an improvement in three cases (follow-up 12 to 41 months, mean 22-2 months). A deterioration in the response rate was observed over time. Postoperative complications were seen in 21 bitches and included an increased frequency of micturition (14 bitches), dysuria (six bitches) and anuria (three bitches). [source]


The Effect of Comorbidity and Socioeconomic Status on Sexual and Urinary Function and on General Health-Related Quality of Life in Men Treated with Radical Prostatectomy for Localized Prostate Cancer

THE JOURNAL OF SEXUAL MEDICINE, Issue 4 2008
Pierre I. Karakiewicz MD
ABSTRACT Introduction., Different treatments for localized prostate cancer (PCa) may be associated with similar overall survival but may demonstrate important differences in health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Therefore, valid interpretation of cancer control outcomes requires adjustment for HRQOL. Aim., To assess the effect of comorbidity and socioeconomic status (SES) on sexual and urinary function as well as general HRQOL in men treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) for PCa. Methods., We sent a self-addressed mail survey, composed of the research and development short form 36-item health survey, the PCa-specific University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Prostate Cancer Index (PCI), as well as a battery of items addressing SES and lifetime prevalence of comorbidity, to 4,546 men treated with RP in Quebec between 1988 and 1996. Main Outcome Measures., The association between comorbidity, SES, and HRQOL was tested and quantified using univariable and multivariable linear regression models. Results., Survey responses from 2,415 participants demonstrated that comorbidity and SES are strongly related to sexual, urinary, and general HRQOL in univariable and multivariable analyses. In multivariable models, the presence of comorbid conditions was associated with significantly worse HRQOL, as evidenced by lower scale scores by as much as 17/100 points in general domains, and by as much as 10/100 points in PCa-specific domains. Favorable SES characteristics were related to higher general (up to 9/100 points) and higher PCa-specific (up to 8/100 points) HRQOL scale scores. Conclusions., Comorbidity and SES are strongly associated with sexual, urinary and general HRQOL. Karakiewicz PI, Bhojani N, Neugut A, Shariat SF, Jeldres C, Graefen M, Perrotte P, Peloquin F, and Kattan MW. The effect of comorbidity and socioeconomic status on sexual and urinary function and on general health-related quality of life in men treated with radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer. J Sex Med 2008;5:919,927. [source]


Cross-sectional and longitudinal comparisons of health-related quality of life between patients with prostate carcinoma and matched controls,,

CANCER, Issue 9 2004
M.P.H., Richard M. Hoffman M.D.
Abstract BACKGROUND Prostate carcinoma and treatments affect health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The authors prospectively compared prostate and general HRQOL between prostate carcinoma cases and an age-matched and ethnicity-matched control group. METHODS The case cohort consisted of 293 men with localized prostate carcinoma who were selected randomly from the population-based New Mexico Tumor Registry, and the control cohort consisted of 618 men who were selected randomly from administrative databases and matched for age and ethnicity. Subjects completed a baseline survey of demographics, socioeconomic status, comorbidity, and prostate and general HRQOL. Also, 210 cases (71.7%) and 421 controls (67.8%) completed a follow-up survey 5 years later. Multinomial logistic regression models compared baseline characteristics as well as 5-year general HRQOL outcomes measured by selected domains of the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36. The authors used a mixed-model repeated-measures analysis of variance and multinomial regression analyses to compare longitudinal changes in urinary, bowel, and sexual function between groups. RESULTS At baseline, patients with prostate carcinoma had better urinary control and sexual function than controls. Over 5 years, sexual function declined significantly among controls, although urinary function remained stable. However, patients with cancer subsequently reported significant declines in both domains and were left with much worse function and more bother than controls. Bowel function and general HRQOL were similar for both groups at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Prostate carcinoma treatment led to significant 5-year declines in urinary and sexual function that far exceeded age-related changes in controls. Patients with cancer had significantly worse function and more bother than controls for these disease-specific domains of HRQOL. Bowel function and general HRQOL were not affected by cancer status. Cancer 2004. Published 2004 American Cancer Society. [source]