UK General Election (uk + general_election)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The evolution of a campaign: tracking press coverage and party press releases through the 2001 UK General Election

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS, Issue 2 2005
Phil Harris
This paper builds upon a content analysis of all news articles that appeared in six national daily newspapers and of all national press releases issued by the three main political parties during the UK General Election 2001 campaign. The results were compared with data from two opinion polls conducted at the start and at the end of the campaign. Here, using the same basic data, we track the coverage of issues in party press releases and daily newspapers on a weekly basis to determine how the parties' priorities and press coverage evolved. The results show that the Labour and Liberal Democrat campaign strategies, in terms of relative issue priorities, did not change during the campaign. However, the Conservatives shifted their attention to the public priorities of Health and Education towards the end of the campaign. There is evidence that the Conservative emphasis on Europe and taxation earlier in the campaign may have influenced the volume of press coverage but did not appear to have affected relative party standings. The implications of these results for political marketers are considered. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Popularity Function Forecasts for the 2005 UK General Election

BRITISH JOURNAL OF POLITICS & INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, Issue 2 2005
David Sanders
The article provides a set of contingent forecasts for the forthcoming UK general election. The forecasts are based on popularity function derived from monthly time series data covering the period 1997,2004. On most likely assumptions, the forecasts produce a clear Labour victory in the early summer of 2005, with the Liberal Democrats increasing their vote share by roughly four percentage points. [source]


Geographically Weighted Discriminant Analysis

GEOGRAPHICAL ANALYSIS, Issue 4 2007
Chris Brunsdon
In this article, we propose a novel analysis technique for geographical data, Geographically Weighted Discriminant Analysis. This approach adapts the method of Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR), allowing the modeling and prediction of categorical response variables. As with GWR, the relationship between predictor and response variables may alter over space, and calibration is achieved using a moving kernel window approach. The methodology is outlined and is illustrated with an example analysis of voting patterns in the 2005 UK general election. The example shows that similar social conditions can lead to different voting outcomes in different parts of England and Wales. Also discussed are techniques for visualizing the results of the analysis and methods for choosing the extent of the moving kernel window. [source]


Political parties' use of web based marketing: some preliminary findings relating to first-time voters in the 2005 general election

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NONPROFIT & VOLUNTARY SECTOR MARKETING, Issue 3 2006
Graeme Drummond
This paper examines the marketing of political parties, via websites, in the 2005 UK general election with specific reference to first-time voters (age 18,24). Common perception views young voters as predominantly politically apathetic and less likely to vote than older generations. However, research literature suggests given the right message and medium, the group will engage in the political process. Could the Internet provide a path to engaging younger voters and will websites become a key marketing vehicle for political parties? Young voters were asked to review political party websites using an extended web assessment method (EWAM), which is an evaluation tool created to determine both the importance and presence of website evaluation criteria. Preliminary research suggests that respondents felt the Internet had a significant role to play in the election process and marketing of campaign messages. However, while political parties scored well in relation to the technical/software aspects of website design, participants felt website material had little appeal and were ineffective in influencing voter intent. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Popularity Function Forecasts for the 2005 UK General Election

BRITISH JOURNAL OF POLITICS & INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, Issue 2 2005
David Sanders
The article provides a set of contingent forecasts for the forthcoming UK general election. The forecasts are based on popularity function derived from monthly time series data covering the period 1997,2004. On most likely assumptions, the forecasts produce a clear Labour victory in the early summer of 2005, with the Liberal Democrats increasing their vote share by roughly four percentage points. [source]