Transitional Care (transitional + care)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Interventions to Improve Transitional Care Between Nursing Homes and Hospitals: A Systematic Review

JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 4 2010
Michael A. LaMantia MD
Transitions between healthcare settings are associated with errors in communication of information and treatment plans for frail older patients, but strategies to improve transitional care are lacking. A systematic review was conducted to identify and evaluate interventions to improve communication of accurate and appropriate medication lists and advance directives for elderly patients who transition between nursing homes and hospitals. MEDLINE, ISI Web, and EBSCO Host (from inception to June 2008) were searched for original, English-language research articles reporting interventions to improve communication of medication lists and advance directives. Five studies ultimately met all inclusion criteria. Two described interventions that enhanced transmission of advance directives, two described interventions that improved communication of medication lists, and one intervention addressed both goals. One study was a randomized controlled trial, whereas the remaining studies used historical or no controls. Study results indicate that a standardized patient transfer form may assist with the communication of advance directives and medication lists and that pharmacist-led review of medication lists may help identify omitted or indicated medications on transfer. Although preliminary evidence supports adoption of these methods to improve transitions between nursing home and hospital, further research is needed to define target populations and outcomes measures for high-quality transitional care. [source]


Perceptions of Transitional Care Needs and Experiences in Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TRANSPLANTATION, Issue 3 2009
S. J. Anthony
Survival following pediatric heart transplantation (HTx) continues to improve. The transition from pediatric to adult care is becoming a pivotal stage in the ongoing medical management of this population. Published data support enhanced outcomes for adolescent patients with increased attention to transitional care. The purpose of this study was to explore the ,transition experience' of adolescent HTx recipients and families. All teens (12,18 years) and parents at a single-center HTx program were invited to participate in semistructured interviews. Qualitative, phenomenological methodology was used to build theoretical knowledge and guided the data collection and analysis. The study population included 14 patients (7 males) with a mean age of 15.7 1.8 years (11.7,17.8 years) and at a mean of 4.1 3.3 years post-HTx (0.3,9.2 years) at the time of study participation. Major themes identified included: (i) adolescent disinterest and apathy regarding transition to adult care versus parental anxiety about their child's eventual departure from the pediatric transplant center, (ii) perceived differences in pediatric versus adult care and (iii) identification of strategies described as helpful in facilitating the transition. Understanding the experiences and perceptions of adolescent HTx recipients and their parents is crucial to planning effective transitional care and necessary for evidenced-based practice. [source]


What is the perceived nature of parental care and support for young people with cystic fibrosis as they enter adult health services?

HEALTH & SOCIAL CARE IN THE COMMUNITY, Issue 1 2010
Nicola Iles RN MSc
Abstract The majority of those diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (CF) now live to adulthood. In response to increased survival age, transition services have been developed to ensure smooth transfer from paediatric to adult specialist healthcare, although the majority of treatment and care continues to be delivered in the home. However, little is known about how young adults and staff conceptualise the nature of the parental role after young people have left paediatric care. The aim of this study is to explore the nature of parental support that is perceived to be available at this time. As part of a larger study of transitional care, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 50 young people with CF aged 13,24 years (32 with experience of transition and/or adult CF services) and 23 specialist healthcare professionals (14 working in adult care) across two CF centres in Southeast England. Interviews took place in young people's homes or within CF services, using a topic guide and were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. Four domains of perceived parental support were identified by the young people interviewed, with varying degrees of continuity into adult care: (1) Providing non-clinical practical and emotional support; (2) Acting as ,troubleshooters' in times of health-related crisis; (3) Working in partnership with offspring in ongoing disease management in the home and clinic; (4) Acting as ,protectors' of their children. Young people and service staff expressed tensions in managing parental involvement in post-paediatric consultations and the degree to which parents should be aware of their offspring's deteriorating health and social concerns. Parental anxiety and over-involvement was perceived by many young people and staff as unsupportive. We suggest that although health and social care providers are mindful of the tensions that arise for those leaving paediatric services, the place of parental support in adult care is currently contentious for these ,new' ageing populations. [source]


Interventions to Improve Transitional Care Between Nursing Homes and Hospitals: A Systematic Review

JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 4 2010
Michael A. LaMantia MD
Transitions between healthcare settings are associated with errors in communication of information and treatment plans for frail older patients, but strategies to improve transitional care are lacking. A systematic review was conducted to identify and evaluate interventions to improve communication of accurate and appropriate medication lists and advance directives for elderly patients who transition between nursing homes and hospitals. MEDLINE, ISI Web, and EBSCO Host (from inception to June 2008) were searched for original, English-language research articles reporting interventions to improve communication of medication lists and advance directives. Five studies ultimately met all inclusion criteria. Two described interventions that enhanced transmission of advance directives, two described interventions that improved communication of medication lists, and one intervention addressed both goals. One study was a randomized controlled trial, whereas the remaining studies used historical or no controls. Study results indicate that a standardized patient transfer form may assist with the communication of advance directives and medication lists and that pharmacist-led review of medication lists may help identify omitted or indicated medications on transfer. Although preliminary evidence supports adoption of these methods to improve transitions between nursing home and hospital, further research is needed to define target populations and outcomes measures for high-quality transitional care. [source]


Patient Problems, Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) Interventions, Time and Contacts Among Five Patient Groups

JOURNAL OF NURSING SCHOLARSHIP, Issue 1 2003
Dorothy Brooten
Purpose: To describe patient problems and APN interventions in each of five clinical trials and to establish links among patient problems, APN interventions, APN time and number of contacts, patient outcomes, and health care costs. Design and Methods: Analysis of 333 interaction logs created by APNs during five randomized controlled trials: (a) very low birthweight infants (n=39); (b) women with unplanned cesarean birth (n=61), (c) high-risk pregnancy (n=44), and (d) hysterectomy (n=53); and (e) elders with cardiac medical and surgical diagnoses (n=139). Logs containing recordings of all APN interactions with participants, APN time and type of patient contact were content analyzed with the smallest phrase or sentence representing a "unit." These units were then classified using the Omaha Classification System to determine patient problems and APN interventions. Groups were compared concerning total amount of APN time, number of contacts per patient, and mean length of time per APN contact. All studies were conducted in the United States. Findings: Groups with greater mean APN time and contacts per patient had greater improvements in patients' outcomes and greater health care cost savings. Of the 150,131 APN interventions, surveillance was the predominant APN function in all five patient groups. Health teaching, guidance, and counseling was the second most frequent category of APN intervention in four of the five groups. In all five groups, treatments and procedures accounted for < 1% of total APN interventions. Distribution of patient problems (N=150,131) differed across groups reflecting the health care problems common to the group. Conclusions: Dose of APN time and contacts makes a difference in improving patient outcomes and reducing health care costs. Skills needed by APNs in providing transitional care include well-developed skills in assessing, teaching, counseling, communicating, collaborating, knowing health behaviors, negotiating systems, and having condition-specific knowledge about different patient problems. [source]


The challenges and opportunities for transitional care research

PEDIATRIC TRANSPLANTATION, Issue 6 2010
J. E. McDonagh
McDonagh JE, Kelly DA. The challenges and opportunities for transitional care research. Pediatr Transplantation 2010: 14:688,700. 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Abstract:, The provision of healthcare for young people with solid organ transplants as they move into adult-centered services has received increasing attention over recent years particularly as non-adherence and graft loss increase after transfer. Despite medical advances and that transitional care is now well established on national and international health agendas, progress in the research arena has unfortunately been slow. The aims of this paper are to consider why this is and discuss the particular challenges facing clinical researchers working within the area. [source]


Perceptions of Transitional Care Needs and Experiences in Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TRANSPLANTATION, Issue 3 2009
S. J. Anthony
Survival following pediatric heart transplantation (HTx) continues to improve. The transition from pediatric to adult care is becoming a pivotal stage in the ongoing medical management of this population. Published data support enhanced outcomes for adolescent patients with increased attention to transitional care. The purpose of this study was to explore the ,transition experience' of adolescent HTx recipients and families. All teens (12,18 years) and parents at a single-center HTx program were invited to participate in semistructured interviews. Qualitative, phenomenological methodology was used to build theoretical knowledge and guided the data collection and analysis. The study population included 14 patients (7 males) with a mean age of 15.7 1.8 years (11.7,17.8 years) and at a mean of 4.1 3.3 years post-HTx (0.3,9.2 years) at the time of study participation. Major themes identified included: (i) adolescent disinterest and apathy regarding transition to adult care versus parental anxiety about their child's eventual departure from the pediatric transplant center, (ii) perceived differences in pediatric versus adult care and (iii) identification of strategies described as helpful in facilitating the transition. Understanding the experiences and perceptions of adolescent HTx recipients and their parents is crucial to planning effective transitional care and necessary for evidenced-based practice. [source]


Quality Indicators for Geriatric Emergency Care

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 5 2009
Kevin M. Terrell DO
Abstract Objectives:, Emergency departments (EDs), similar to other health care environments, are concerned with improving the quality of patient care. Older patients comprise a large, growing, and particularly vulnerable subset of ED users. The project objective was to develop ED-specific quality indicators for older patients to help practitioners identify quality gaps and focus quality improvement efforts. Methods:, The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Geriatric Task Force, including members representing the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), selected three conditions where there are quality gaps in the care of older patients: cognitive assessment, pain management, and transitional care in both directions between nursing homes and EDs. For each condition, a content expert created potential quality indicators based on a systematic review of the literature, supplemented with expert opinion when necessary. The original candidate quality indicators were modified in response to evaluation by four groups: the Task Force, the SAEM Geriatric Interest Group, and audiences at the 2007 SAEM Annual Meeting and the 2008 American Geriatrics Society Annual Meeting. Results:, The authors offer 6 quality indicators for cognitive assessment, 6 for pain management, and 11 for transitions between nursing homes and EDs. Conclusions:, These quality indicators will help researchers and clinicians target quality improvement efforts. The next steps will be to test the feasibility of capturing the quality indicators in existing medical records and to measure the extent to which each quality indicator is successfully met in current emergency practice. [source]


ADHD and transition to adult services , the experience of community paediatricians

CHILD: CARE, HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT, Issue 5 2008
H. Marcer
Abstract Background Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is now recognized as a disorder that can persist into adulthood, and therefore, there is a need for transitional care. Aim To find out about the experiences of community pediatricians across the UK when transferring patients with ADHD to adult care. Method A questionnaire was sent out to 100 consultant community pediatricians asking about their experiences. Results The majority of respondents thought a proportion of their patients would require referral to adult services and only 22% were aware of a dedicated clinic for adults in their area. Many had tried to address the issue locally often with little success. Conclusion There is a gap in provision of services for young people with ADHD when they leave pediatric care, with many pediatricians struggling to find appropriate ongoing care for their patients. Commissioners need to address the problem. [source]


Young people's satisfaction of transitional care in adolescent rheumatology in the UK

CHILD: CARE, HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT, Issue 4 2007
K. L. Shaw
Abstract Background To examine the quality of transitional health care from the perspectives of young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and their parents. Methods Adolescents with JIA and their parents were recruited from 10 major UK rheumatology centres. Satisfaction with health-care delivery was measured prior to, and 12 months after, the implementation of a structured and co-ordinated programme of transitional care using self-completed questionnaires designed for this study. Results Of 359 families invited to participate, 308 (86%) adolescents with JIA and 303 (84%) parents/guardians accepted. A fifth of adolescents had persistent oligoarthritis. Median age was 14.2 (11,18) years with median disease duration of 5.7 (0,16) years. Young people and their parents rated provider characteristics more important than aspects of the physical environment or process issues. Staff honesty and knowledge were rated as the most essential aspects of best practice. Prior to implementing the programme of transitional care, parents rated service delivery for all items significantly worse than best practice. Overall satisfaction improved 12 months after entering the programme. However, while parent satisfaction improved for 70.4% of items, significant improvements were only observed for three (13.6%) items rated by adolescents. Conclusion The perceived quality of health care for young people with JIA and their parents was significantly lower than what they would like. Satisfaction with many aspects of care during transition from paediatric to adult services can be improved through the implementation of a structured, co-ordinated programme of transitional care. [source]