Transfer Practices (transfer + practice)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Applying a ,stages of change' model to enhance a traditional evaluation of a research transfer course

JOURNAL OF EVALUATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE, Issue 4 2003
Leslie L. Buckley MD MPH
Abstract The aim of this study was to utilize an evaluation tool based on Prochaska's model of change in order to assess behaviour change as part of an evaluation process for a research transfer training programme (RTTP). The RTTP was a training programme offered to scientists in a psychiatry department and research institute to gain skills in research transfer. In addition to a traditional course evaluation framework evaluating overall satisfaction with the course and whether or not learning objectives were met, an additional ,stages of change' evaluation tool designed to assess change along a continuum was utilized. This instrument measured change in participants' attitudes, intentions and actions with respect to research transfer practice and consisted of a 12-question survey completed by participants prior to taking the course and 3 months post-course. In two out of the three categories, attitudes and intention to practice, there was positive change from pre- to post-course (P < 0.05). Although there was a trend of increased RT-related action, this was less robust and did not reach significance. For the RTTP transfer course, a ,stages of change' model of evaluation provided an enhanced understanding by showing changes in participants that would otherwise have been overlooked if only changes in RT behaviour were measured. Additionally, evaluating along a change continuum specifically identifies areas for improvement in future courses. The instrument developed for this study could also be used as a pre-course, participant needs assessment to tailor a course to the change needs of participants. Finally, this ,stages of change' approach provides insight into where barriers to change may exist for research transfer action. [source]


Defining a knowledge strategy framework for process aligned organizations: an IBM case

KNOWLEDGE AND PROCESS MANAGEMENT: THE JOURNAL OF CORPORATE TRANSFORMATION, Issue 2 2008
Stephen McLaughlin
Many organizations struggling to capitalize on their knowledge assets tend to let their knowledge management systems emerge from existing IT systems and infrastructure. Within a complex business environment this can cause a mismatch between how knowledge assets are, and should be managed. In order to help organizations develop dynamic and effective KM systems, the authors' suggest that organizations need to re-think how knowledge is created and shared around their core business processes. To be more specific the author's contend that for organizations where inter/intra organizational collaboration is vital to overall end-to-end performance, such as in a supply chain, organizations need to consider first the relationship between what the authors see as four key components. These are knowledge strategy, core process optimization, core process performance and knowledge barriers. This paper will explain why these components are important, and the relationship between them. The findings put forward in this paper are based on research concerned with improving process performance through knowledge transfer. The research follows a critical theory approach to identify best knowledge transfer practice across complex organizations. The research is exploratory in nature and a case study methodology is used to support this line of inductive theory building. The findings presented are based on data collated within, and across IBM's integrated supply chain. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


METHODS, TRENDS AND CONTROVERSIES IN CONTEMPORARY BENEFIT TRANSFER

JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC SURVEYS, Issue 3 2010
Robert J. Johnston
Abstract Benefit transfer uses research results from pre-existing primary research to predict welfare estimates for other sites of policy significance for which primary valuation estimates are unavailable. Despite the sizable literature and the ubiquity of benefit transfer in policy analysis, the method remains subject to controversy. There is also a divergence between transfer practices recommended by the scholarly literature and those commonly applied within policy analysis. The size, complexity and relative disorganization of the literature may represent an obstacle to the use of updated methods by practitioners. Recognizing the importance of benefit transfer for policymaking and the breadth of associated scholarly work, this paper reviews and synthesizes the benefit transfer literature. It highlights methods, trends and controversies in contemporary research, identifies issues and challenges facing benefit transfer practitioners and summarizes research contributions. Several areas of future research on benefit transfers naturally emerge. [source]


The effect of organizational culture on knowledge management practices and innovation

KNOWLEDGE AND PROCESS MANAGEMENT: THE JOURNAL OF CORPORATE TRANSFORMATION, Issue 2 2010
Mario J. Donate
In this paper we analyze the relationships between certain knowledge management (KM) practices, organizational culture, and the technological results of companies. In the last few years, KM literature has highlighted the important role of cultural values on the way KM processes are developed and applied in organizations. From this viewpoint, and focusing on a set of knowledge storage and transfer practices, we try to empirically analyze the existence of a multiplier effect of the knowledge-centered organizational culture on the relationship between these kinds of knowledge practices and the technological performance of firms. The results of the empirical study show the existence of a significant moderating effect, although the consequences on the innovative performance in terms of product or process technologies are found to be different, depending on the practice (storage or transfer) which is considered. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Situational and Demographic Influences on Transfer System Characteristics in Organizations

PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT QUARTERLY, Issue 3 2006
Hsin-Chih Chen
Transfer theories, which are closely related to evaluation theory, have been developed from a holistic perspective, but most of empirical transfer research has not effectively utilized holistic models to investigate transfer of learning until the late 1990s. Additionally, little has been done in examining the relationship between situational variables, demographic variables, and transfer system characteristics. This study contributes to transfer research by examining the combined effects of situational and demographic variables on a holistic model of perceived organizational transfer systems. A key finding was that demographic variables make only a marginal contribution to predicting transfer system characteristics when compared to situational variables. It seems clear that the differences in transfer system characteristics depend on diverse situational influences, primarily due to types of training programs and types of organizational cultures. This finding does not support one-size-fits-all transfer interventions. Future research may focus on investigating benchmark transfer practices in certain types of organizations or industries to empirically identify the true leverage points of a diagnosing instrument of transfer,the Learning Transfer System Inventory,for interventions and change. [source]