Trade Structure (trade + structure)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Fiscal Policy Coordination and International Trade

ECONOMICA, Issue 294 2007
TORBEN M. ANDERSEN
While assertions are often made that non-cooperative fiscal policies suffer a contractionary bias, general equilibrium models have shown that the bias is unambiguously expansionary. This paper argues that the latter result relies on a particular and critical way of modelling international trade, and that under a more plausible trade structure, it is possible that fiscal policy is insufficiently expansionary in the non-cooperative case. Non-cooperative policy-making thus implies that fiscal policies are used too little if they expand private employment, and too much if they contract private employment. Inefficiencies in non-cooperative fiscal policies worsen when product markets become more integrated. [source]


Similarity in trade structures, integration and catching-up1

THE ECONOMICS OF TRANSITION, Issue 2 2008
Luca De Benedictis
CEECs; export composition; growth; EU enlargement Abstract In this paper, we look at the role of export composition in the growth process, considering how increased similarity in trade structure among countries can induce catching-up in income levels in a group of countries in transition. We analyze the sectoral export patterns of the Central and Eastern European countries (CEECs) by comparing them to those of the current members of the European Union (EU), focusing on countries' specialization as suppliers for the EU market, and we assess whether similar export patterns foster the catching-up process of the CEECs. Our main result is that similarity in export composition has a positive, significant and non-linear impact on catching-up, and seems to be driven by the growth of the main export market and delocalization of production more than by other factors. [source]


Implications of World Trade Organisation accession for China's agricultural trade patterns

AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL & RESOURCE ECONOMICS, Issue 2 2002
Colin A. Carter
This paper examines the composition of China's international trade from 1980 to 1997, with a focus on agriculture and a view towards understanding agriculture's changing trade structure relative to other sectors. We analyse the time series behaviour of individually traded goods at the Standard Industrial Trade Classification three-digit level, categorised into three groups: agricultural commodities, ,other' primary commodities and manufactures. We find that China's agricultural trade has expanded along comparative advantage lines in only a very modest way, suggesting that World Trade Organization membership will have a large impact on China's agricultural trade patterns. [source]


Real Exchange Rate in China: A Long-run Perspective

CHINA AND WORLD ECONOMY, Issue 4 2006
Haihong Gao
F14; F31; F43 Abstract This paper investigates the RMB exchange rate from a long-run viewpoint. Whether China's rapid economic growth brought about real exchange rate appreciation between 1975 and 2002 is empirically examined, based on a supply-side model, the Balassa,Semuelson Hypothesis (BSH). The same test is conducted on Japan, Hong Kong, Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, the Philippines, Indonesia and India. Our result indicates that the BSH only exists where the industrial structure has been upgraded and the economy has been successfully transformed from an agricultural economy to a manufacturing economy. Interestingly, China, among those where the BSH does not present, appears to be upgrading its industrial and trade structure. We then try to answer the question of why past rapid growth has no significant relationship with the RMB real exchange rate and what factors are underlying the trend of the RMB real exchange rate. We expect an appreciating trend of RMB real exchange rate in the foreseeable future, presuming that China's industrial upgrading process continues and the factors pertaining to the BSH's prediction, such as rise of wage rates in both tradables and nontradables, become more significant. (Edited by Xiaoming Feng) [source]


Similarity in trade structures, integration and catching-up1

THE ECONOMICS OF TRANSITION, Issue 2 2008
Luca De Benedictis
CEECs; export composition; growth; EU enlargement Abstract In this paper, we look at the role of export composition in the growth process, considering how increased similarity in trade structure among countries can induce catching-up in income levels in a group of countries in transition. We analyze the sectoral export patterns of the Central and Eastern European countries (CEECs) by comparing them to those of the current members of the European Union (EU), focusing on countries' specialization as suppliers for the EU market, and we assess whether similar export patterns foster the catching-up process of the CEECs. Our main result is that similarity in export composition has a positive, significant and non-linear impact on catching-up, and seems to be driven by the growth of the main export market and delocalization of production more than by other factors. [source]


Dimensions of quality upgrading

THE ECONOMICS OF TRANSITION, Issue 1 2005
Evidence from CEECs
Abstract The impact of the Central and Eastern European (CEE) economies' trade integration with European markets on CEE trade structures has been studied extensively. These studies frequently observe a quality upgrading of CEE exports. In this paper we consider three dimensions of quality upgrading: upgrading across industries, upgrading across different quality segments within industries and, finally, product upgrading within quality segments inside industries. For the analysis we partition industries into quality segments based on EU-15 import unit values. The results for ten CEE countries (comprising the CEE-5, the Baltics and South East Europe) and thirteen industries suggest fundamental differences, both across country groups and across the three different notions of quality upgrading. The CEE-5 show no evidence of entering a ,low-quality trap' in all three dimensions. By contrast, while there is a general catching-up process across industries and inside quality segments, the second notion of low-quality specialization may be applicable within the high-tech industries to the performance for the Baltics and South East Europe as a group. [source]