Basic Guidelines (basic + guideline)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Using mixed methods research in medical education: basic guidelines for researchers

MEDICAL EDUCATION, Issue 7 2009
Karen E Schifferdecker
Context, Mixed methods research involves the collection, analysis and integration of both qualitative and quantitative data in a single study. The benefits of a mixed methods approach are particularly evident when studying new questions or complex initiatives and interactions, which is often the case in medical education research. Basic guidelines for when to use mixed methods research and how to design a mixed methods study in medical education research are not readily available. Methods, The purpose of this paper is to remedy that situation by providing an overview of mixed methods research, research design models relevant for medical education research, examples of each research design model in medical education research, and basic guidelines for medical education researchers interested in mixed methods research. Conclusions, Mixed methods may prove superior in increasing the integrity and applicability of findings when studying new or complex initiatives and interactions in medical education research. They deserve an increased presence and recognition in medical education research. [source]


The keloid phenomenon: Progress toward a solution

CLINICAL ANATOMY, Issue 1 2007
Louise Louw
Abstract For centuries, keloids have been an enigma and despite considerable research to unravel this phenomenon no universally accepted treatment protocol currently exists. Historically, the etiology of keloids has been hypothesized by multiple different theories; however, a more contemporary view postulates a multifactoral basis for this disorder involving nutritional, biochemical, immunological, and genetic factors that play a role in this abnormal wound healing. Critical to the process of preventing or managing keloids is the need to locally control fibroblasts and their activities at the wound site. In recent years, considerable evidence has accumulated demonstrating the importance of fatty acids and bioactive lipids in health and disease, especially those involving inflammatory disorders or immune dysfunction. If hypertrophic scarring and keloid formation can be argued to have significant inflammatory histories, then it is possible to postulate a role for lipids in their etiology and potentially in their treatment. This report briefly visits past views and theories on keloid formation and treatment, and offers a theoretical rationale for considering adjuvant fatty acid therapy for keloid management. Sufficient scientific evidence in support of fatty acid strategies for the prevention and treatment of keloids currently exists, which offer opportunities to bridge the gap between the laboratory and the clinic. The intent of this paper is to serve as a basic guideline for researchers, nutritionists, and clinicians interested in keloids and to propose new directions for keloid management. Clin. Anat. 20:3,14, 2007. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Using mixed methods research in medical education: basic guidelines for researchers

MEDICAL EDUCATION, Issue 7 2009
Karen E Schifferdecker
Context, Mixed methods research involves the collection, analysis and integration of both qualitative and quantitative data in a single study. The benefits of a mixed methods approach are particularly evident when studying new questions or complex initiatives and interactions, which is often the case in medical education research. Basic guidelines for when to use mixed methods research and how to design a mixed methods study in medical education research are not readily available. Methods, The purpose of this paper is to remedy that situation by providing an overview of mixed methods research, research design models relevant for medical education research, examples of each research design model in medical education research, and basic guidelines for medical education researchers interested in mixed methods research. Conclusions, Mixed methods may prove superior in increasing the integrity and applicability of findings when studying new or complex initiatives and interactions in medical education research. They deserve an increased presence and recognition in medical education research. [source]


Neonatal management of symptomatic transplacental cryoglobulinaemia

ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 4 2004
V Laugel
This study reports the first case of symptomatic placental transfer of cryoglobulins and discusses the potential pathogenic processes and the basic guidelines for neonatal management. A 32-y-old woman was affected by essential type I cryoglobulinaemia and displayed the cold-triggered cutaneous symptoms of the disease due to a monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) cryoglobulin. She gave birth to healthy dizygotic twins who were placed in incubators immediately after birth and did not show any cutaneous or visceral lesion in the first 2 d. Cyanotic macules appeared on the hand and foot of one of the newborns when they were removed from the incubators. The same monoclonal IgG-, cryoglobulin was identified in the two newborns'cord blood and in the mother's serum. The skin lesions disappeared within 1 wk as both twins were transiently replaced in incubators. No recurrence of skin lesions was observed even at room temperature and, 6 mo later, both twins were healthy and their clinical examination was normal. Conclusion: To the authors'knowledge, this is the first report of placental transfer of cryoglobulins and the first description of any neonatal effect. Neonates born to mothers suffering from IgG cryoglobulinaemia should be protected against cold to avoid precipitation of the pathogenic cryoglobulins, until spontaneous resolution. [source]