Theological Ethics (theological + ethics)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


THEOLOGICAL ETHICS, THE CHURCHES, AND GLOBAL POLITICS

JOURNAL OF RELIGIOUS ETHICS, Issue 3 2007
Lisa Sowle Cahill
ABSTRACT Several discourses about theology, church, and politics are occurring among Christian theologians in the United States. One influential strand centers on the communitarian theology of Stanley Hauerwas, who calls on Christians to witness faithfully against liberalism in general and war in particular. Jeffrey Stout, in his widely discussed Democracy and Tradition (2004), responds that religious people ought precisely to endorse those democratic and liberal American traditions that join religious and secular counterparts to battle injustice. Hauerwas, Stout, and many of their interlocutors envision liberal U.S. culture as the context of Christian social ethics. The ensuing debate rarely incorporates Catholic scholars, feminist scholars, scholars of color, or international and liberationist voices. Their inclusion could enhance an understanding of the role of the church in society, and support a common morality in the face of global pluralism. More importantly, it could broaden the scope of discourse on religion and politics to envision global Christian social ethics. [source]


Do Dolphins Carry the Cross Biological Moral Realism and Theological Ethics

NEW BLACKFRIARS, Issue 994 2003
Michael S Northcott
First page of article [source]


Theological Ethics and Global Dynamics in the Time of Many Worlds.

THE HEYTHROP JOURNAL, Issue 1 2007
By William Schweiker
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


,The Indivisible Whole of God's Reality': On the Agency of Jesus in Bonhoeffer's Ethics

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY, Issue 3 2010
CHRISTOPHER HOLMES
In conversation with Karl Barth, this article explores Bonhoeffer's account in his Ethics of the character of the agency exercised by Jesus Christ in the world today in relation to the principal task of theological ethics: namely, the engendering of the most humane form of existence possible within the mandates of work, family, government and church. The article argues that the theological work undertaken by the command of God ensures that these mandates remain christologically determined spheres in which concrete obedience is enacted, and thus the places in which the reality that Jesus Christ is achieves social and historical form. [source]


Capability as Opportunity: How Amartya Sen Revises Equal Opportunity

JOURNAL OF RELIGIOUS ETHICS, Issue 1 2002
Harlan Beckley
Although the concept of equal opportunity has received scant attention from theological ethics, it attracts widespread approval in the U.S. popular culture and has been examined extensively by contemporary moral philosophy. Amartya Sen's conception of capabilities as "freedom" or "real opportunity" corrects deficiencies in both popular and philosophical conceptions of equal opportunity that ignore interpersonal variations in mental, physical, and psychological abilities beyond agents' control. Recent theologically informed conceptions of love and common grace affirm and revise Sen's conception of equal capability as equal opportunity. The resulting understanding of equal opportunity is quite different from some uses of this concept and could be an important criterion for a just society. [source]


DIETRICH BONHOEFFER,AN ETHICS OF GOD'S APOCALYPSE?

MODERN THEOLOGY, Issue 4 2007
PHILIP G. ZIEGLER
Bonhoeffer's theology generally and his Ethics in particular have not commonly been thought to be ,apocalyptic'. Indeed, many have adjudged him to be "almost immunized" against such eschatology. Yet, a close reading of Bonhoeffer's Ethics shows unmistakable resonances between the themes, tasks and argumentative forms of his theological ethics and the contours of pauline apocalyptic as set forth recently in the work of J. Louis Martyn and others. In this text, Bonhoeffer confronts the question ,What has paraenesis to do with apocalypsis?' and experiments with answers which acknowledge that ,the incursion of a new world' in Christ ,renders ancient good uncouth.' Seeing this illumines several aspects of Bonhoeffer's theological ethics, clarifies the importance of the doctrine of justification therein, and emphasises its dynamic, dialectical and pauline character. [source]


The Influence of Social Critical Theory on Edward Schillebeeckx's Theology of Suffering for Others

THE HEYTHROP JOURNAL, Issue 2 2001
Elizabeth K. TillarArticle first published online: 16 DEC 200
Edward Schillebeeckx has consolidated the theoretical and practical dimensions of the Christian approach to human suffering in his theological method, specifically his theology of suffering for others. The various elements and sources of his method can be gleaned from his later writings, especially those published during the 1970s and 1980s. Schillebeeckx's theology is anchored in (1) the Thomist-phenomenological approach of Flemish philosopher Dominic De Petter; (2) the historical-experiential theology of Marie-Dominique Chenu; and (3) the social theory of the Frankfurt School. De Petter's perspective on Aquinas integrated a Thomist epistemology with the phenomenological notion that concepts cannot ultimately capture the reality of human experience. From Chenu, Schillebeeckx acquired his commitment to both solid historical research and engagement with socio-political problems facing church and world. The problem of suffering, which constitutes an essential dimension of Schillebeeckx's theological ethics with its dual emphasis on theory and praxis, raises the question of human responsibility in the face of unjust and needless suffering. His theoretical-practical approach to the alleviation of human suffering evolved within the framework of social critical theory, specifically: (a) Schillebeeckx's theological integration of Theodor Adorno's negative dialectics into his own method of correlation, which promotes various forms of critical resistance to socio-political injustice rather than a single program; and (b) the unification of theory and praxis, a priority of Jürgen Habermas's ,new' critical theory that Schillebeeckx endorses. Both principles of critical theory , negative dialectics and the union of theory and praxis , inform Schillebeeckx's eschatological orientation and his conception of liturgy as a form of social ethics. [source]