Tension-type Headaches (tension-type + headaches)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Implicit Associations in Tension-Type Headaches: A Cognitive Analysis Based on Stress Reactivity Processes

HEADACHE, Issue 8 2006
Jennifer F. Armstrong BS
Objective.,To determine whether tension-type headache (TTH) patients display stronger associations between negative events and headache-related information than headache-free controls. Background.,Generally, stress/diathesis models are common in clinical research and in the context of TTHs specifically. Data involving stress reactivity processes are compatible with such models. However, it would be of interest to tap the associative cognitive processes that likely mediate such relations. Methods.,In the present study, we selectively recruited individuals who do (n = 19) and do not (n = 19) suffer from episodic TTHs. We examined implicit associations between negative evaluations and headache-related information through the use of an implicit association test. Results.,As hypothesized, TTH patients displayed associations between negative evaluations and headache-related information, whereas the control group did not. Conclusions.,These data provide initial support for a plausible cognitive model for the occurrence of TTHs among predisposed individuals. [source]


Extending the Efficacy of a Thermal Biofeedback Treatment Package to the Management of Tension-type Headaches in Children

HEADACHE, Issue 2 2001
Richard E. Arndorfer PhD
This study explored the efficacy of a thermal biofeedback treatment package as an intervention with children with tension-type headaches. In a within-subject, time-lagged, multiple baseline design, five children, aged 8 to 14 years, were assigned to baselines of varying lengths prior to receiving treatment. Treatment was introduced sequentially across subjects and involved six thermal biofeedback treatment visits. Parents were also given guidelines for how best to encourage children to independently use the biofeedback skills. Data confirm that the participants learned the handwarming skill, practiced the skill on a regular basis during treatment, and independently used the skills to manage their pain. All participants demonstrated clinically significant reductions in one or more headache parameters (frequency, duration, intensity) following treatment. At 6-month follow-up, four of the five participants were headache-free. Although the thermal biofeedback treatment package was generally effective for these children with tension-type headaches, the specific type of headache experienced by each child appeared to influence the specific response to treatment. In addition, no single measure of headache activity was the best indicator of response to treatment. The efficacy of the thermal biofeedback treatment package is supported as an alternative treatment for children suffering from tension-type headaches. [source]


Treating Chronic Tension-type Headache Not Responding to Amitriptyline Hydrochloride With Paroxetine Hydrochloride: A Pilot Evaluation

HEADACHE, Issue 9 2003
Kenneth A. Holroyd PhD
Context.,In some individuals, chronic tension-type headache fails to respond to tricyclic antidepressant medications that often serve as first-line therapy. Objective.,To evaluate the clinical efficacy of paroxetine hydrochloride for chronic tension-type headache not responding to amitriptyline hydrochloride. Design and Setting.,Open-label trial of paroxetine conducted at 2 outpatient sites in Ohio. Participants and Intervention.,Thirty-one adults (mean age, 37 years; 20 women) with chronic tension-type headache (mean, 25 headache days per month) who had failed to respond (less than 30% improvement) to treatment with either amitriptyline (n = 13) or matched placebo (n = 18). All participants were treated with paroxetine (up to 40 mg per day) in a 9-month protocol. Outcome Measures.,Monthly headache index calculated as the mean of pain ratings (0 to 10 scale) recorded by participants in a diary 4 times per day, number of days per month with at least moderate pain (pain rating of 5 or greater), and analgesic medication use. Results.,In patients who had not responded to amitriptyline, paroxetine failed to reduce chronic tension-type headaches or analgesic medication use. In patients who had not responded to placebo, paroxetine produced modest reductions in chronic tension-type headaches and analgesic use. Conclusions.,We found no evidence that chronic tension-type headaches that failed to respond to tricyclic antidepressant therapy with amitriptyline improved when subsequently treated with paroxetine. More support was found for the efficacy of paroxetine in patients with chronic tension-type headaches who had failed to respond to placebo. [source]


Extending the Efficacy of a Thermal Biofeedback Treatment Package to the Management of Tension-type Headaches in Children

HEADACHE, Issue 2 2001
Richard E. Arndorfer PhD
This study explored the efficacy of a thermal biofeedback treatment package as an intervention with children with tension-type headaches. In a within-subject, time-lagged, multiple baseline design, five children, aged 8 to 14 years, were assigned to baselines of varying lengths prior to receiving treatment. Treatment was introduced sequentially across subjects and involved six thermal biofeedback treatment visits. Parents were also given guidelines for how best to encourage children to independently use the biofeedback skills. Data confirm that the participants learned the handwarming skill, practiced the skill on a regular basis during treatment, and independently used the skills to manage their pain. All participants demonstrated clinically significant reductions in one or more headache parameters (frequency, duration, intensity) following treatment. At 6-month follow-up, four of the five participants were headache-free. Although the thermal biofeedback treatment package was generally effective for these children with tension-type headaches, the specific type of headache experienced by each child appeared to influence the specific response to treatment. In addition, no single measure of headache activity was the best indicator of response to treatment. The efficacy of the thermal biofeedback treatment package is supported as an alternative treatment for children suffering from tension-type headaches. [source]


Mirtazapine: only for depression?

ACTA NEUROPSYCHIATRICA, Issue 3-4 2006
Luis San
Background:, Mirtazapine is an antidepressant first approved in the Netherlands in 1994 for the treatment of major depressive disorder. However, evidence suggests its effectiveness in a variety of other psychiatric disorders and non-psychiatric medical conditions. Objective:, The present paper reviews the published literature on the off-label indications of Mirtazapine. Methods:, A search of the relevant literature from MEDLINE, PsycLIT and EMBASE databases, included in the Science Citation Index and available up to March 2006, was conducted using the terms mirtazapine, case-reports, open-label trials and randomized controlled trials. Only articles referring to conditions other than major depression were included in this present review. Results:, Off-label use of mirtazapine has been reported in panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, dysthymia, menopausal depression, poststroke depression, depression as a result of infection with human immunodeficiency virus, elderly depression, Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)-induced depression, hot flashes, alcohol and other substance use disorders, sleep disorders, sexual disorders, tension-type headaches, cancer pain, fibromyalgia, schizophrenia and other less frequent conditions. Conclusions:, So far, data on the off-label usefulness of mirtazapine are limited and mainly based on observations from case reports or open-label studies. However, positive cues suggest that confirmation of these preliminary data with randomized controlled trials may give sufficient evidence to warrant the use of mirtazapine in a broad range of disorders. [source]