Tendon Sheath (tendon + sheath)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Indications and techniques for tenoscopic surgery of the digital flexor tendon sheath

EQUINE VETERINARY EDUCATION, Issue 4 2005
L. A. Fortier
First page of article [source]


Juvenile psoriatic arthritis with nail psoriasis in the absence of cutaneous lesions

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY, Issue 1 2000
Carola Duran-McKinster MD
A 4-year-old white boy without a significant family history had morning stiffness and painful swelling of his left knee and ankle, right elbow, and dorsolumbar region of 2 months' evolution. The following laboratory studies were within normal limits: complete blood cell count, C-reactive protein (CRP), latex, antistreptolysin, and antinuclear antibodies. Rheumatoid factor was negative and an increase in the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was detected (56 mm/h). The pediatric department made an initial diagnosis of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and treatment with acetylsalicylic acid at 100 mg/kg/day and naproxen at 10 mg/kg/day was started. A thick, yellowish toenail was diagnosed as onychomycosis. No mycologic investigations were performed. Intermittent episodes of painful arthritis of different joints were present. The radiographic features of the peripheral joints included: narrow joint spaces, articular erosions, soft tissue swelling, and diffuse bony demineralization. Characteristic bilateral sacroiliitis and a swollen tendon sheath on the left ankle were detected. At 11 years of age the nail changes had extended to five other toenails and to four fingernails, were yellow,brown in color, and showed marked subungual hyperkeratosis ( Figs 1, 2). The rest of the nails showed significant nail pitting. Trials of griseofulvin alternated with itraconazole in an irregular form for five consecutive years resulted in no clinical improvement, which prompted a consultation to our dermatology department. On three different occasions, KOH nail specimens were negative for fungus, but the presence of parakeratotic cells aroused the suspicion of psoriasis. A complete physical examination was negative for psoriatic skin lesions. A nail bed biopsy specimen was characteristic of nail psoriasis ( Fig. 3). Figure 1. Thickened nails with severe subungual hyperkeratosis in five fingernails Figure 2. Secondary deformity of nail plate. No "sausage" fingers were observed Figure 3. Light microscopic appearance of a nail biopsy specimen showing parakeratotic hyperkeratosis, elongation of interpapillary processes, and Munroe abscess (arrow) (hematoxylin and eosin stain, 40) The following human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) were positive: A9, A10, B12, B27, Cw1, Bw4, DR6, DR7, DQ1, DQ2, and DR53. A diagnosis of juvenile psoriatic arthritis associated with nail psoriasis was made. Toenail involvement became so painful that walking became very difficult. Occlusive 40% urea in vaseline applied to the affected toenails for 48 h resulted in significant improvement. Currently, the patient is 20 years old with nail involvement, but no psoriatic skin lesions have ever been observed. [source]


Sonography of the shoulder after arthrography (arthrosonography): Preliminary results

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ULTRASOUND, Issue 1 2002
Hak Soo Lee MD
Abstract Purpose The purpose of this study was to verify whether arthrosonography improves diagnostic accuracy in diseases of the shoulder and provides additional information for therapeutic planning, compared with conventional sonography. Methods We prospectively studied 113 consecutive patients with chronic shoulder pain. Sonography was performed before and after arthrography, with the radiologist blinded to the results of arthrography. When a rotator cuff tear was detected sonographically, its type, location, and size were recorded; we also evaluated any changes in the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa and any abnormalities in the biceps tendon sheath. The diagnostic accuracy of conventional sonography and arthrosonography was compared with that of arthrography for rotator cuff tear. Changes in the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa and biceps tendon sheath seen on conventional sonography were also compared with those seen on arthrosonography. Results The sensitivity and specificity of conventional sonography in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tear were 86% (25/29) and 95% (80/84), respectively; for arthrosonography, the values were 97% (28/29) and 95% (80/84), respectively. The differences in sensitivity and specificity for the 2 sonographic techniques were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The accuracy in localizing the tear was also not significantly different between the 2 sonographic techniques. Synovial proliferation was more easily detected with arthrosonography than it was with conventional sonography in the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa (p < 0.01) and in the biceps tendon sheath (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Our preliminary results suggest that although arthrosonography was not superior to conventional sonography in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears, it may provide a better assessment of the size of tears and additional information about synovial proliferation in the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa and the biceps tendon sheath. 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 30:23,32, 2002. [source]


High-pressure paint-gun injury of the finger simulating giant cell tumor of tendon sheath

JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS PATHOLOGY, Issue 2 2005
Catherine M. Stefanato
At this pressure, paint will penetrate the skin and spread quickly through fascial planes and tendon sheaths. The present case is that of a lesion from the finger of a 35-year-old white male in whom a history was initially unavailable. Histologic examination revealed diffuse fibrohistiocytic proliferation and giant cells, with numerous darkly pigmented, uniformly small-sized particles throughout the lesion. The initial impression was that of a giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. However, the pigment particles were negative for Perls stain, and polariscopic examination revealed clear refractile fragments. These findings raised the possibility that the lesion was the result of a traumatic event. On further inquiry, it was revealed that the patient had sustained a high-pressure paint-gun injury 1 year earlier. The simulation, histopathologically, of a giant cell tumor of tendon sheath by a high-pressure paint-gun injury has not, to our knowledge, been reported previously, nor has the histologic finding of small, uniformly sized pigment particles and polarizable refractile fragments in this particular type of injury. [source]


A case of tenosynovial chondromatosis with tophus-like deposits,

APMIS, Issue 9 2004
Case report
Tenosynovial chondromatosis has not been well recognized because of its rarity, but it is clinically important because of its high rate of recurrence. We report here a case of tenosynovial chondromatosis with deposits of crystalline material that appeared to be sodium urate (gouty tophi). A 37-year-old Japanese man was admitted because of a hard mass in his left third finger. He had undergone surgery at the same anatomical site four and seven years previously. The roentgenogram revealed a soft tissue mass in the flexor aspect of the proximal phalanx. At operation, the tumor was found to have arisen in the tendon sheath. Histopathological examination showed that the tumor was composed of well-defined, multiple, cartilaginous nodules that were surrounded by tenosynovial tissue. A few of the nodules were calcified. The chondrocytes had mild atypia, and were immunopositive for S-100 protein. A diagnosis of tenosynovial chondromatosis was made. The nodules also contained crystalline deposits, which bore a histological resemblance to gouty tophi. We were unable to define the exact nature of these deposits even by transmission electron microscopy and electron roentgenographic microanalysis. Crystalline deposits in chondromas of soft tissue have been reported but not in tenosynovial chondromatosis. [source]


Doppler sonographic findings in the long bicipital tendon sheath in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as compared with patients with degenerative diseases of the shoulder

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM, Issue 7 2003
Johannes Strunk
Objective To compare power Doppler sonography (PDS) findings inside the bicipital tendon sheath in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and degenerative disorders of the shoulder, in order to evaluate the diagnostic value of PDS in distinguishing between inflammatory and noninflammatory shoulder pain. Methods The glenohumeral joints of 41 consecutive patients with shoulder pain were examined by ultrasound. Using ventral transverse and longitudinal scanning, the vascularity near and/or inside the bicipital tendon sheath was visualized by PDS. One fully trained and experienced examiner performed the sonography. Representative images were digitally stored and were read, under blinded conditions, by 2 independent investigators, who categorized the Doppler signals as being either inside or outside the tendon sheath. Results Biceps tendon sheath effusion, represented by the typical hypoechoic rim, was found in 95.8% of the RA patients (23 of 24) and in 58.8% of the patients with degenerative disorders (10 of 17). PDS signals were localized to inside the tendon sheath in 22 of the RA patients (91.7%) and in none of the patients with degenerative disorders. Although no PDS signal was found inside the tendon sheath in patients with degenerative disorders, in 9 of these patients (52.9%), signals could be localized to the environment of the tendon sheath. Conclusion PDS demonstrates vascularity in the long bicipital tendon sheath of patients with RA, but not in those with degenerative shoulder disorders. [source]


High-pressure paint-gun injury of the finger simulating giant cell tumor of tendon sheath

JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS PATHOLOGY, Issue 2 2005
Catherine M. Stefanato
At this pressure, paint will penetrate the skin and spread quickly through fascial planes and tendon sheaths. The present case is that of a lesion from the finger of a 35-year-old white male in whom a history was initially unavailable. Histologic examination revealed diffuse fibrohistiocytic proliferation and giant cells, with numerous darkly pigmented, uniformly small-sized particles throughout the lesion. The initial impression was that of a giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. However, the pigment particles were negative for Perls stain, and polariscopic examination revealed clear refractile fragments. These findings raised the possibility that the lesion was the result of a traumatic event. On further inquiry, it was revealed that the patient had sustained a high-pressure paint-gun injury 1 year earlier. The simulation, histopathologically, of a giant cell tumor of tendon sheath by a high-pressure paint-gun injury has not, to our knowledge, been reported previously, nor has the histologic finding of small, uniformly sized pigment particles and polarizable refractile fragments in this particular type of injury. [source]


Histopathologic changes at "synovio,entheseal complexes" suggesting a novel mechanism for synovitis in osteoarthritis and spondylarthritis

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM, Issue 11 2007
Michael Benjamin
Objective To determine the extent to which different entheses form part of a "synovio,entheseal complex" (SEC) and whether such SECs are commonly associated with the presence of inflammatory cells and evidence of enthesis microdamage. Methods Specimens from 49 cadaveric entheses were processed for histologic study, and all soft tissue components of the entheses or enthesis organs were examined. To exclude articular cartilage degeneration as a triggering factor for synovitis, the selected entheses included 17 that were not immediately adjacent to such cartilage. Results An SEC was present at 82% of entheses. These included 47% of the attachments not adjacent to articular cartilage, where the synovium was that of bursae or tendon sheaths. One or more of a wide variety of degenerative changes were noted on the soft tissue side of every enthesis; the most common changes were cell clustering and/or fissuring (in 76% of entheses). Synovial villus formation or inflammatory cell infiltration was seen in 85% of entheses, and in 73% of attachments there were also inflammatory cells in the enthesis organ itself. The changes included synovial invasion (pannus formation) of the enthesis. Conclusion Entheses are frequently juxtaposed to synovium, thus forming SECs. They are also often associated with both degenerative and inflammatory changes, and the latter may involve the immediately adjacent synovium. These findings suggest a novel mechanism by which synovitis could develop in both degenerative joint disease and spondylarthritis. [source]