Television

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Humanities and Social Sciences

Kinds of Television

  • digital television
  • watching television

  • Terms modified by Television

  • television advertisement
  • television advertising
  • television channel
  • television commercial
  • television exposure
  • television food advertising
  • television news
  • television program
  • television series
  • television viewing

  • Selected Abstracts


    A Declaration of Independence

    ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, Issue 4 2000
    David Graham
    Television was a true mass medium, its ,classic' output located within the concerns and lives of ordinary people. Television was also the amphitheatre of the nation, in which great events were played out. As a result of its massive power, regulation was imposed on it. By the 1970s, the unitary power of national channels was beginning to break down, first with the arrival of the VCR, then with satellite and cable. Along with this, came a growing separation of the broadcasting from the creative or programme making function driven by ,independent' producers. This divergence is now being hastened by the end of ,spectrum scarcity'. Creative companies and teams will strive to control their work and share in the rewards of their success in a way that will create a very different kind of entertainment industry in the 21st Century. [source]


    Reasons to Consider a Plasma Screen Television,Photosensitive Epilepsy

    EPILEPSIA, Issue 10 2007
    Alok Sharma
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    May the weak force be with you: The power of the mass media in modern politics

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF POLITICAL RESEARCH, Issue 2 2006
    KENNETH NEWTON
    Television is often said to undermine democratic government popular support for leaders and institutions. In spite of all that has been written about media malaise, however, both theory and evidence suggests that the media are a comparatively weak force whose effects can be deflected, diluted and diffused by stronger forces. These include bedrocks political values associated with class, religion, age, gender and education, as well as social networks and discussions, distrust of the mass media, and personal knowledge and experience. Equally, the variables that mediate the media may also magnify its effects so that what appears to be a large media effect is, in fact, the result of an interaction between the media and other forces. This article lays out the argument of the media malaise literature that covers government and politics, then outlines the social forces that mediate the media, and finally provides some evidence to illustrate the argument that the media are generally a weak force in society. [source]


    A peer-to-peer IPTV service architecture for the IP multimedia subsystem

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS, Issue 6-7 2010
    A. Bikfalvi
    Abstract During these last years the Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) service and the different peer-to-peer (P2P) technologies have generated an increasing interest for the developers and the research community that find in them the solution to deal with the scalability problem of media streaming and reducing costs at the same time. However, despite of the benefits obtained in Internet-based applications and the growing deployment of commercial IPTV systems, there has been a little effort in combining them both. With the advent of the next-generation-network platforms such as the IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS), which advocates for an open and inter-operable service infrastructure, P2P emerges as a possible solution in situations where the traditional streaming mechanisms are not possible or not economically feasible. In this paper, we propose an IPTV service architecture for the IMS that combines a centralized control layer and a distributed, P2P-like, media layer that relies on the IMS devices or peers located in the customers' premises to act as streaming forwarding nodes. We extend the existing IMS IPTV standardization work that has already been done in 3GPP and ETSI TISPAN in order to require a minimum number of architectural changes. The objective is to obtain a system with a similar performance to the one in currently deployed systems and with the flexibility of P2P. One of the main challenges is to achieve comparable response times to user actions such as changing and tuning into channels, as well as providing a fast recovery mechanism when streaming nodes leave. To accomplish this we introduce the idea of foster peers as peers having inactive multimedia sessions and reserved resources. These peers are on stand-by until their functionality is required and at that moment, they are able to accept downstream peers at short notice for events requiring urgent treatment like channel changing and recovery. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Television and Violence in the Economy of Memory

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF JAPANESE SOCIOLOGY, Issue 1 2002
    Mamoru Ito
    The present paper aims to consider the cultural function of television as a technology for the creation of a public memory. The television system records past images, preserves them, and broadcasts various historical programs. A viewer owns the public memory jointly, through watching/consuming programs. However, the process of production and consumption of programs is linked with the exclusion of other historical memories from the public space. After all, the creation of public memories in depth is related to social power. Through the analysis in concrete terms of a series of programs of Project X and the second episode of the Nippon Hoso Kyokai (NHK; Japan Broadcasting Corporation) series, Special Edition: Judging War, the relationship between the organization of public memories and social power is explored. Project X depicts the challenges of engineers of middle standing who initiated new industrial and technological developments in the 1960s and 1970s. Special Edition: Judging War is based on coverage of the Women's International War Crimes Tribunal on Japan's Military Sexual Slavery. This program was subjected to revision on the eve of its broadcast. What forms of expression were eliminated? These two programs should help us define more clearly what the Japanese media selects for incorporation into the public memory. [source]


    Feedback: Television against Democracy by joselit, david

    JOURNAL OF AESTHETICS AND ART CRITICISM, Issue 1 2008
    CLARK BUCKNER
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Television and attitudes toward mental health issues: Cultivation analysis and the third-person effect

    JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 2 2007
    Donald L. Diefenbach
    A television content analysis and survey of 419 community respondents supports the hypothesis that media stereotypes affect public attitudes toward mental health issues. A content analysis of network, prime-time television demonstrates that portrayals are violent, false, and negative. The mentally disordered are portrayed as 10 times more likely to be a violent criminal than nonmentally disordered television characters. A survey demonstrates that as television viewing increases so does the belief among viewers that locating mental health services in residential neighborhoods will endanger the residents. Viewers who watch television news are less likely to support living next to someone who is mentally ill. The survey also tests the third-person effect, and finds that viewers believe television portrayals of mental illness affect others more than themselves. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


    Embedded Advertising on Television: Classic Legal Environment and Business Law Content "Brought to You by ,"

    JOURNAL OF LEGAL STUDIES EDUCATION, Issue 2 2010
    Rita Marie Cain
    First page of article [source]


    Content analysis of food advertising in Turkish television

    JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, Issue 7-8 2010
    Tulay Guran
    Aim: Television (TV) viewing has been implicated in children's weight gain. We aimed to conduct a comprehensive content analysis of TV food advertising in Turkey. Methods: TV advertisements (ads) in the four most popular national free to air Turkish TV channels, were assessed on two weekdays and two weekend days at four time periods of the day; 0800,1200,1200,1600,1600,2000 and 2000,2400 h for each TV channel (64 h assessed for each TV channel), making a total of 256 h. Each ad was analysed for food and drink content, duration and audiovisual properties. Results: There were 8853 TV ads and 2848 of these were related to food (32.1%). A majority of food ads included high-calorie, high-fat, high-sugar food and drink rather than core/healthy foods (81%). Chocolate and chocolate bars were the most frequently advertised food/drink product, followed by cakes, coffee, tea, candies, gum, fast food, chips, juices/carbonated beverages, margarine and ice-cream formed the highest rate of food products advertised in decreasing order. Thirty per cent of all obesogenic/unhealthy ads targeted childhood by using audiovisual techniques. The proportion of total advertisements which were for food or drink, and the proportion of food advertisements that were for unhealthy foods were both much higher at the weekend (33% vs. 30% and 84% vs. 78%, respectively). The time period between 1600 and 2000 h was the most concentrated time slot (33%) for food advertising. Conclusions: This study provides data for the first time on the high levels of obesogenic food advertising on Turkish TV. This should alarm policy-makers to set limits on food advertising targeted towards children especially in countries like Turkey in which childhood obesity is emerging as an important public health issue. [source]


    Anthropology on European Television: The Case of Arts du Mythe/Kunst und Mythos

    AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGIST, Issue 2 2010
    Damien Stankiewicz
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Reflections of an Ethnographic Filmmaker-Maker: An Interview with Paul Henley, Director of the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology, University of Manchester

    AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGIST, Issue 1 2009
    CARLOS Y. FLORES
    ABSTRACT, Two decades ago the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology (GCVA) at the University of Manchester, U.K., was created. Since then it has become one of the most acclaimed postgraduate visual anthropology schools in the world, providing a space for theoretical debate and training in ethnographic filmmaking techniques. Conceived originally as a master's program under the sponsorship of Granada Television and the University of Manchester, it has now extended training to the Ph.D. level to students from around the world. In this interview, Professor Paul Henley, GCVA,s director since its inception, reflects on the last 20 years of the Granada Centre, ethnographic filmmaking, the state of the art in theory and practice in visual anthropology, and new possibilities and challenges for the future. [Keywords: visual anthropology, ethnographic filmmaking, documentary, Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology] [source]


    Production Culture: Industrial Reflexivity and Critical Practice in Film and Television by John Thornton Caldwell

    AMERICAN ETHNOLOGIST, Issue 4 2009
    SASHA DAVID
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Talking Heads: Capturing Dayak Deathways on Film

    AMERICAN ETHNOLOGIST, Issue 1 2001
    Anne Schiller
    In 1996, an elite group of Ngaju Dayak religious activists invited National Geographic Television to film their rites of secondary treatment of the dead in the village ofPetak Putih, Central Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo. In this article; I explore activists' efforts to engage the National Geographic Society and their attempts to exert a high degree of control over the manner in which local traditions were portrayed to the filmmakers. I focus in particular on how representations of specific local practices figure in the recasting of a contemporary Dayak face, and on questions concerning religious authenticity and authority. I argue that the activists' interest in making a film, and their decisions during its shooting were part of their larger organizational strategies, with potentially far-reaching political and economic consequences. [Indonesia, Dayaks, religion, identity, tourism, filmmaking] [source]


    Politics and the Media in Postcommunist Russia

    POLITICS, Issue 1 2003
    Stephen White
    The evidence of a nationally representative survey conducted in April 2001 suggests that television is the medium of choice for most Russians. At least 92 per cent watch at least several times a week, with state channels more popular than those in commercial ownership. The media enjoy a high level of trust, and there is widespread agreement that they should adopt a stabilising role in society rather than simply report developments. Television is the main source of information when Russians make their electoral choices; there are accordingly considerable implications in the extent to which pro-Kremlin candidates and parties enjoy the support of the state media, which in turn are the favourite viewing of the voters that support them. [source]


    Urban Space and the Mediation of Political Action in Nepal: Local Television, Ritual Processions and Political Violence as Technologies of Enchantment

    THE AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 1 2008
    Michael Wilmore
    This paper examines how political identities in the town of Tansen in the central western district of Palpa, Nepal, are mediated by contrasting forms of cultural and material practice: religious and secular processions and programs made by a local, cable-television production organisation. These practices and their materiality are conceptualised as ,technologies of enchantment' (Gell 1992) through which political culture is made manifest in urban space. Paradigmatically ,modern' and ,traditional' technologies are juxtaposed in order to analyse the different ways that political action is embodied within the community. The loss of life in Tansen and the destruction of buildings associated with these practices in the course of the 10-year Maoist insurgency provide a tragic confirmation of the conclusions reached in this paper. [source]


    Science on the Air: Popularizers and Personalities on Radio and Early Television by Marcel Chotkowski LaFollette

    THE JOURNAL OF AMERICAN CULTURE, Issue 2 2009
    Matthew H. Hersch
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Historical Dictionary of African-American Television

    THE JOURNAL OF AMERICAN CULTURE, Issue 2 2006
    Kathy Merlock Jackson
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Hollywood's West: The American Frontier in Film, Television, and History

    THE JOURNAL OF AMERICAN CULTURE, Issue 2 2006
    Ray B. Browne
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Cold War, Cool Medium: Television, McCarthyism, and American Culture

    THE JOURNAL OF AMERICAN CULTURE, Issue 1 2006
    Marshall W. Fishwick
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Buffy Goes Dark: Essays on the Final Two Seasons of Buffy the Vampire Slayer on Television and Buffy and Angel Conquer the Internet: Essays on Online Fandom

    THE JOURNAL OF POPULAR CULTURE, Issue 6 2009
    Stephanie Eve Boone
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    The Amazing Transforming Superhero!: Essays on the Revision of Characters in Comic Books, Film and Television

    THE JOURNAL OF POPULAR CULTURE, Issue 1 2009
    Frederick A. WrightArticle first published online: 22 JAN 200
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    thirtysomething: Television, Women, Men, and Work

    THE JOURNAL OF POPULAR CULTURE, Issue 6 2008
    Jennifer Reed
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Romancing the Screen: An Examination of Moving from Television to the World Wide Web in a Quest for Quasi-Intimacy

    THE JOURNAL OF POPULAR CULTURE, Issue 4 2008
    TRACEY BOWENArticle first published online: 15 JUL 200
    First page of article [source]


    The Road Story and the Rebel: Moving Through Film, Fiction, and Television

    THE JOURNAL OF POPULAR CULTURE, Issue 6 2007
    Colleen Glenn
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    William Beaudine: From Silents to Television

    THE JOURNAL OF POPULAR CULTURE, Issue 1 2006
    Sharon R. Yang
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Over the Top Judaism: Precedents and Trends in the Depiction of Jewish Beliefs and Observances in Film and Television

    THE JOURNAL OF POPULAR CULTURE, Issue 4 2005
    Michael GesinArticle first published online: 24 MAR 200
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Quality Popular Television: Cult TV, the Industry and Fans

    THE JOURNAL OF POPULAR CULTURE, Issue 4 2004
    Lisa Alexander
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Beat the Heat: don't forget your drink , a brief public education program

    AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, Issue 4 2010
    Tracey Oakman
    Abstract Background: The Beat the Heat: don't forget your drink program was initiated to enable the general public to recognise and manage heat stress. It was accompanied by a telephone survey to assess program reach and knowledge and behaviours of the general public in managing heat stress. Methods: The program was implemented in the Riverina-Murray region of New South Wales, in the summer of 2008/09, through radio and television sound bytes, newspaper announcements, distribution of posters and brochures, and public talks. Computer Assisted Telephone Interviews were conducted with 328 randomly selected participants from across the region. Results: Sixty-three per cent of participants reported hearing heat health warnings and 53% changed their heat management strategies, although only 25% recalled the program slogan. On average, participants self-rated their understanding of managing heat health at 7.9 on a 10 point scale. More than 75% of participants said they would recognise the symptoms of heat stress. Most reported exposure to heat and health information from television, radio and newspapers rather than from posters, brochures and talks. Those at greatest risk included people who worked or exercised outdoors, men and those taking medication. Conclusions: Television, radio and newspapers were successful media for the program. Knowledge and responses of the general public to heat risks were well developed, with several exceptions , people taking medications, or working or playing sports outdoors, as well as tourists and men. These exceptions should be targeted in future programs. [source]


    Content storage architectures for boosted IPTV service

    BELL LABS TECHNICAL JOURNAL, Issue 3 2008
    Marc Verhoeyen
    Television (TV) consumers adore interactivity and personalization. Internet Protocol television (IPTV) systems help satisfy this desire by providing different services including video-on-demand (VoD), network personal video recording (NPVR), and time shift TV (TSTV). However, these services place a heavy traffic load on the network by requiring a unicast video stream for each active customer. This paper discusses means to reduce the network traffic load by introducing storage deep in the network-thus avoiding the need for unicast traffic support over the metro or core network-and algorithms to place content intelligently on those storage devices. An algorithm for intelligent redistribution is described that endeavors to place the most appropriate content close to consumers. The paper discusses further how this new paradigm of network storage can help improve quality of experience for the IPTV consumer and can assist in the deployment of Internet video and sharing of user-generated content (UGC). 2008 Alcatel-Lucent. [source]


    The Nature of Modernity, Television, and Fiction

    COMMUNICATION THEORY, Issue 3 2000
    Pamela Kalbfleisch
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]