Teaching Course (teaching + course)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


7th Triennial Teaching Course in Clinical Neurophysiology Wadham College, Oxford 30th March to 4th April 2008

JOURNAL OF THE PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, Issue 4 2007
Article first published online: 26 NOV 200
[source]


Hub-and-spoke model for a 5-day structured patient education programme for people with Type 1 diabetes

DIABETIC MEDICINE, Issue 9 2009
H. Rogers
Abstract Aims, Structured education programmes for people with Type 1 diabetes can deliver improved diabetes control (including reduced severe hypoglycaemia) and quality of life. They can be cost-effective but are resource intensive. We tested the ability to deliver an evidence-based 5-day programme in diabetes centres too small to deliver the courses. Methods, Specialist medical and nursing staff from three district general hospital diabetes services (the ,spokes') were trained in all aspects of the education programme, except those directly related to course delivery, by a larger centre (the ,hub'). The hub staff delivered the 5-day patient education courses, but all other patient education and management was managed locally. Diabetes control and quality of life were assessed at 1 year post-course. Results, In 63 patients with follow-up data, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) fell by 0.42 1.0% (P = 0.001), with a greater fall in those with high HbA1c at baseline, and no mean weight gain. Emergency call-out for severe hypoglycaemia fell from 10 episodes in seven patients the year before to one episode in one patient (P = 0.03). Quality-of-life measures improved, with reduced negative impact of diabetes on diabetes-related quality of life (P < 0.00004) and ,present quality of life' improving (P < 0.001). Conclusions, The benefits of a 5-day structured education programme can be provided to patients with Type 1 diabetes attending centres without the resources to provide the teaching course itself, by a ,hub-and-spoke' methodology. [source]


Training the trainers: do teaching courses develop teaching skills?

MEDICAL EDUCATION, Issue 8 2004
Joyce Godfrey
Objective, This paper reports on consultants' self-assessed changes in their teaching and training practices over an 8,10-month period. It compares the changes between a group undergoing a 3-day teaching course (participants) and a sample group taken from the course waiting list (controls). Method, A questionnaire listing 18 teaching skills was given to the participants immediately prior to the course and 8,10 months later, and to the controls at the same time intervals. Respondents were asked to rate their ability, frequency of use of each skill, as well as their teaching confidence and effectiveness. Additionally, the second questionnaire asked respondents to identify changes they had made to their teaching. A total of 63% (54) of participants and 51% (23) of controls completed both questionnaires. Changes of 2 + on the rating scales were seen as genuine. The number of such changes was calculated for each individual and on each skill for the 2 groups. Data were analysed using a Mann,Whitney U -test. Results, The majority of course participants reported positive changes in teaching ability on a significantly greater number of skills than did the control group. As a group, changes in ability in 16 of the teaching skills were significantly greater for the participants than for the controls. Increased ability resulted in participants' increased frequency of use of only 4 of the teaching skills. The majority in the participant group reported changes to their teaching. Only a minority in the control group reported such changes. These changes were consistent with course topics and the teaching skills needed to meet General Medical Council recommendations for the education of new doctors. Conclusions, The teaching course is an effective vehicle for increasing consultants' teaching skills. [source]


Short-Term Effects of a Health Promotion Course for Taiwanese Nursing Students

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 1 2005
Ya-Chu Hsiao
Abstract, The purposes of this study were to (a) develop a teaching course on health promotion for nursing students in Taiwan, (b) evaluate the effects of this teaching course, and (c) understand students' appraisals of its effectiveness in helping them to change unhealthy behavior. A sample of 65 randomly selected female nursing students took an 18-week course developed by the investigators, which included 30 h of classroom lectures and 4 weeks of written reports by students chronicling the changes in their behavior. Health promotion questionnaires administered before and after the course and content analysis of the students' reports were used to evaluate the effects of the course. Students' questionnaire scores after course completion indicated significantly increased intent to adopt healthy lifestyles. Content analysis of students' reports on their personal behavior-changing experiences showed that they accepted the potential value of curriculum aspects such as "experiencing the struggle, suffering, and even abandonment of the process,""experiencing the benefits of change,""increasing self-confidence," and "empathizing with how difficult it is for clients to change behavior." These results support the value of teaching courses on health promotion to nursing students. The authors recommend including such a course as part of a regular nursing education. [source]


Training the trainers: do teaching courses develop teaching skills?

MEDICAL EDUCATION, Issue 8 2004
Joyce Godfrey
Objective, This paper reports on consultants' self-assessed changes in their teaching and training practices over an 8,10-month period. It compares the changes between a group undergoing a 3-day teaching course (participants) and a sample group taken from the course waiting list (controls). Method, A questionnaire listing 18 teaching skills was given to the participants immediately prior to the course and 8,10 months later, and to the controls at the same time intervals. Respondents were asked to rate their ability, frequency of use of each skill, as well as their teaching confidence and effectiveness. Additionally, the second questionnaire asked respondents to identify changes they had made to their teaching. A total of 63% (54) of participants and 51% (23) of controls completed both questionnaires. Changes of 2 + on the rating scales were seen as genuine. The number of such changes was calculated for each individual and on each skill for the 2 groups. Data were analysed using a Mann,Whitney U -test. Results, The majority of course participants reported positive changes in teaching ability on a significantly greater number of skills than did the control group. As a group, changes in ability in 16 of the teaching skills were significantly greater for the participants than for the controls. Increased ability resulted in participants' increased frequency of use of only 4 of the teaching skills. The majority in the participant group reported changes to their teaching. Only a minority in the control group reported such changes. These changes were consistent with course topics and the teaching skills needed to meet General Medical Council recommendations for the education of new doctors. Conclusions, The teaching course is an effective vehicle for increasing consultants' teaching skills. [source]