Teacher Education (teacher + education)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Teacher Education

  • initial teacher education

  • Terms modified by Teacher Education

  • teacher education program

  • Selected Abstracts


    TEACHER EDUCATION: Reflections upon teacher education in severe difficulties in the USA: shared concerns about quantity and quality

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPECIAL EDUCATION, Issue 2 2009
    Phyllis Jones
    In this article, Phyllis Jones of the Department of Special Education at the University of South Florida and Elizabeth West from the University of Washington explore key issues in respect to teacher education for teachers who teach pupils with severe and profound learning difficulties in the USA. Issues relating to quantity and quality of teachers are discussed in the context of policy and practice in the USA. Reflections related to teacher education delivery in the USA, in terms of case-based learning and distance education, for example, and the content of teacher education courses, for example, in terms of helping teachers to understand the needs of pupils with learning difficulties and the promotion of evidence-based practices, are discussed. Phyllis Jones and Elizabeth West suggest that their reflections can contribute to continuing discussions about teacher education in the UK for teachers who work with pupils with severe and profound learning difficulties. [source]


    The readiness is all The degree level qualifications and preparedness of initial teacher trainees in English

    ENGLISH IN EDUCATION, Issue 2 2010
    Julie Blake
    Abstract This article is the first of two reporting research concerned with the profile of degree level qualifications of initial teacher trainees who start Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) Secondary English courses. In a context where there is no existing database of such information, the researchers sought to establish the patterns in this profile and collate a summary of Initial Teacher Education (ITE) tutors' perceptions about the level of subject knowledge preparedness of students with different degree level qualifications. Following from this, the enquiry was also interested in the ways that PGCE institutions support students with different subject knowledge development needs. The article that follows below treats the issue of degree qualifications and the PGCE selection process in the context of recent changes to subject English. The evidence suggests patterned but divergent practices with an overall trend of preference for prior qualifications in English Literature despite significant alterations in the study of English since 1980. PGCE courses surveyed attract many more applicants than there were places and tutors exercise considerable discretion in admissions practices which are not always made transparent by published policies and rationales, including those made available to prospective applicants. The review of the literature showed little published discourse on this topic to date. [source]


    Queering Art Teacher Education

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ART & DESIGN EDUCATION, Issue 1 2007
    Kimberly Cosier
    This article sounds a call to action and addresses the challenges of creating inclusive, queer-affrming art teacher education curricula. We examine such challenges through case study vignettes of our varied US university settings and explore the perils of teaching in an increasingly queer-hostile culture. Strategies are given for avoiding attacks against LGBT-supportive pedagogy and championing the cause of social justice for queer students, parents, artists, teachers and faculty. [source]


    Instructional Pragmatics: Bridging Teaching, Research, and Teacher Education

    LINGUISTICS & LANGUAGE COMPASS (ELECTRONIC), Issue 10 2010
    Noriko Ishihara
    Pragmatics deals with meaning in context that is the meaning conveyed often indirectly beyond what is literally communicated. Ever since Hymes (1972, Sociolinguistics: Selected readings, Penguin, Harmondsworth, England, 269,93) highlighted the importance of socially appropriate language use, ability to use language in context has been identified as an essential component of communicative competence (e.g., Canale and Swain, 1980, Applied Linguistics, 1: 1,47; Canale, 1983, Language and communication, Longman, Harlow; Bachman, 1990, Fundamental considerations in language testing, Oxford University Press, Oxford; Bachman & Palmer, 1996, Language testing in practice: Designing and developing useful language tests, Oxford University Press, Oxford; Celce-Murcia, 2008, Intercultural language use and language learning, Springer, The Netherlands, 41,58; Celce-Murcia et al. 1995, Issues in Applied Linguistics, 6: 5,35), and there has been rigorous research investigating the pragmatic competence of second/foreign language (L2) learners. This paper aims to provide an overview of research conducted in the area of interlanguage pragmatics with a focus on its pedagogical component, instructional pragmatics. The primary emphasis of this paper will be placed on the introduction of current resources in instructional pragmatics and recent efforts that empirically inform pragmatic-focused instruction and classroom-based assessment. The paper concludes with the discussion of the issues associated with future pragmatics-focused instruction and curriculum development, along with a suggested direction for future research and teacher education in support of instructional pragmatics. [source]


    Knowledge of Language in Foreign Language Teacher Education

    MODERN LANGUAGE JOURNAL, Issue 2 2009
    JAMES P. LANTOLF
    First page of article [source]


    Toward a Socioliterate Approach to Second Language Teacher Education

    MODERN LANGUAGE JOURNAL, Issue 3 2002
    John S. Hedgcock
    This article proposes that effective language teacher preparation should facilitate candidates' access to the shared knowledge, discursive practices, and instructional processes of language teaching (LT) as an inherently disparate discipline. Whereas the reflective orientation widely embraced in North American teacher education programs should be preserved, reflective practice should be promoted within a socioliterate framework. The author explores the position that teacher education must be grounded partly (though not exclusively) in what is commonly called "theory," but that this theoretical dimension should be developed by systematically examining socioeducational practices. A genre,based, sociorhetorical approach to LT discourse, it is argued, can build candidates' awareness of knowledge,construction practices, enhance their declarative knowledge, and develop their professional skills. By modeling analytic and reflective processes that focus on disciplinary knowledge, teacher education can help LT candidates to shape their own professional literacies, enabling them to participate meaningfully in the profession's many conversations. [source]


    Taking the Golden State Path to Teacher Education: California Partnerships Among Two-Year Colleges and University Centers

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES, Issue 121 2003
    Linda Serra Hagedorn
    This chapter describes the current teacher credentialing situation in California, the community college Teacher and Reading Development Partnership (TRDP) program, and six California community college programs dedicated to the elimination of an acute teacher shortage. [source]


    High School, Community Colleges, and Universities: Partners in Teacher Education and National Efforts

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES, Issue 121 2003
    Fred Gaskin
    This chapter focuses on the activities and outcomes of the Teacher Education Partnership Commission in Arizona and the efforts of the newly formed National Association of Community College Teacher Education Programs. [source]


    From Consensus Standards to Evidence of Claims: Assessment and Accreditation in the Case of Teacher Education

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION, Issue 113 2001
    Frank Brush Murray
    To what extent should accreditation focus on the processes of assessing student learning outcomes, and to what extent should it primarily be concerned with the levels of student attainment within the institution or program under review? There is a need to evaluate the purposes of procedural and substantive standards and the claims they make about graduates' competence. [source]


    It's Not the Culture of Poverty, It's the Poverty of Culture: The Problem with Teacher Education

    ANTHROPOLOGY & EDUCATION QUARTERLY, Issue 2 2006
    Gloria Ladson-Billings
    The preparation of novice teachers is dominated by psychological notions almost to the exclusion of other social science paradigms. The perspective that is least likely to be evident in teacher preparation is that of anthropology. However, prospective and novice teachers regularly and loosely use the word "culture" as an explanation for student patterns of behavior they cannot explain. This discussion focuses on the ways prospective and novice teachers construct culture simultaneously as both the problem and the answer to their struggles with students different from themseles. [source]


    Teachers' Education, Classroom Quality, and Young Children's Academic Skills: Results From Seven Studies of Preschool Programs

    CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Issue 2 2007
    Diane M. Early
    In an effort to provide high-quality preschool education, policymakers are increasingly requiring public preschool teachers to have at least a Bachelor's degree, preferably in early childhood education. Seven major studies of early care and education were used to predict classroom quality and children's academic outcomes from the educational attainment and major of teachers of 4-year-olds. The findings indicate largely null or contradictory associations, indicating that policies focused solely on increasing teachers' education will not suffice for improving classroom quality or maximizing children's academic gains. Instead, raising the effectiveness of early childhood education likely will require a broad range of professional development activities and supports targeted toward teachers' interactions with children. [source]


    Storytelling as Pedagogy: An Unexpected Outcome of Narrative Inquiry

    CURRICULUM INQUIRY, Issue 2 2007
    CATHY COULTER
    ABSTRACT This study examines how the use of narrative research methods can serve as pedagogical strategies in preservice teacher education. In this study, we see the intersection of narrative inquiry and storytelling-as-pedagogy. The two often intersect, but rarely has that intersection been examined in a systematic manner. This study examines data collected as one ESL preservice teacher and one Bilingual preservice teacher were followed from their language arts methods class into student teaching and then their first year of teaching to see how they reflected on, questioned, and learned from their experiences. Incidents where narrative inquiry served as pedagogical tools were examined. Although storytelling-as-pedagogy was not a goal in this study, we found that it was an outcome of utilizing narrative inquiry as a methodology. [source]


    An Essay on the Role of Language in Collegiate Foreign Language Programmatic Reform,

    DIE UNTERRICHTSPRAXIS/TEACHING GERMAN, Issue 2 2009
    Hiram Maxim
    This position paper argues that collegiate foreign language (FL) education has lost sight of the central role that language plays in the profession. Regardless of one's sub-field within foreign language education (i.e., linguistic, literary, or cultural studies), the profession shares the common focus of exploring how to make and interpret meaning in and through language. The paper therefore recommends that an acknowledgement of and re-commitment to this foundational principle provides common ground to effect the types of change within departments that have long been called: the integration of upper- and lower-level instruction; the reform of graduate student teacher education to foster curricular thinking; the explicit and systematic attention to the development of advanced language abilities; and the establishment of a collaborative departmental culture centered around publicly shared beliefs and concerns. [source]


    Making Teachers in Britain: Professional knowledge for initial teacher education in England and Scotland

    EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY AND THEORY, Issue 3 2006
    Ian Menter
    Abstract There is an apparent contradiction between the widespread moves towards a uniform and instrumentalist standards-based approach to teaching on the one hand and recent research-based insights into the complexity of effective pedagogies. The former tendency reflects a politically driven agenda, the latter is more professionally driven. Tensions reflecting such a contradiction are evident in the debates over initial teacher education (ITE) policy and practice in many parts of the world. This article examines aspects of ITE policy in two contiguous parts of the United Kingdom, England and Scotland. The authors draw on a comparative study carried out during 2002,2004, particularly on an analysis of key contemporary policy documents, in order to consider some of the similarities and differences that are apparent in these two countries. It is argued that while features of national culture, tradition and institutional politics have a significant role to play in the detail of the approaches taken, there is nevertheless evidence of significant convergence between both countries in one aspect of the determination of initial teacher education, the definition of teaching through the prescription of standards, which set official parameters on professional knowledge required for entry into the profession. This, it is suggested, reflects trends associated with neoliberal ,globalisation'. [source]


    LIVING THE QUESTIONS: RILKE'S CHALLENGE TO OUR QUEST FOR CERTAINTY

    EDUCATIONAL THEORY, Issue 1 2007
    Mordechai Gordon
    The quest for certainty in education refers to our desire to gain a sense of psychological security and more control over a field that is fundamentally indeterminate. This quest implies an unwillingness to live with the inherent complexities and risks of education. After exploring the meaning and import of Rilke's challenge and comparing it to the position of Socrates, Gordon uses Rilke's insight to analyze a specific educational experience and then discusses some of its educational implications for teacher education. [source]


    Showing the Strategy where to go: possibilities for creative approaches to Key Stage 3 literacy teaching in initial teacher education

    ENGLISH IN EDUCATION, Issue 1 2005
    David Stevens
    Abstract This paper arises from a research project undertaken with six PGCE student teachers of English, based on observation and discussion of English lessons based on the National Strategy's Framework for Teaching English. I draw also on the student teachers' reflections and written commentaries. The central thrust of the research was to enquire whether and how classroom practice could demonstrate an imaginative, meaning-orientated form of English teaching which included the Framework: how exactly learning opportunities might arise in lively, engaging and effective ways. [source]


    Teachers' Pedagogical Beliefs and the Standards for Foreign Language Learning

    FOREIGN LANGUAGE ANNALS, Issue 5 2002
    Article first published online: 9 SEP 2010, Linda Quinn Allen
    ABSTRACT: This study examined Midwestern foreign language teachers, (n = 613) responses to the Foreign Language Education Questionnaire (FLEQ) in order to determine the extent to which their beliefs are consistent with major constructs underlying the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. Additionally, respondents rated their familiarity with the standards and provided background information that was used to identify factors that influence their beliefs. The purpose of this study was to provide direction for teacher education, in-service professional development, and future research. Analysis of the data suggests that the teachers believe that foreign language instruction should be delivered in the target language, available to all students, consonant with the "Weave of Curricular Elements," included in early elementary school curriculum, and within the coverage model. Generally, the teachers felt somewhat familiar with the standards. Factors that have an impact on their beliefs include urban versus rural location, membership in professional organizations, gender, percentage of teaching assignment in a foreign language, highest educational degree earned, and private versus public school. [source]


    The interplay between learning and the use of ICT in Rwandan student teachers' everyday practice

    JOURNAL OF COMPUTER ASSISTED LEARNING, Issue 6 2009
    E. Mukama
    Abstract The paper describes a study conducted in Rwanda involving 12 participants selected from a larger cohort of 24 final-year university students who were part of a group-based training programme. The programme was about how to search, retrieve, and use web-based literature. Empirical data were collected through interviews and focus group discussions. The purpose was to explore ways of using information and communication technology (ICT) in student teachers' everyday learning practice. The study draws from a sociocultural perspective and emphasis is put on a literature review involving ICT in teacher education. The findings reveal that utilization of ICT pertains to three major types of variation among student teachers who use ICT: passive, reluctant, and active users. The active ICT users demonstrated a capacity to cross group boundaries and play a central role as agents of change in learning practice. The point is that more experienced student teachers can assist their colleagues in the zone of proximal development and, therefore, enhance the integration of the new technology in teacher education. This implies that having access to ICT together with some instruction is not sufficient to prompt students to start using this technology as a pedagogical tool. Moreover, confrontation of different experiences regarding the use of ICT can spearhead change in student teachers' learning practice through critical reflection. [source]


    Enriching spaces in practice-based education to support collaboration while mobile: the case of teacher education

    JOURNAL OF COMPUTER ASSISTED LEARNING, Issue 4 2007
    E.M. Morken
    Abstract Practice-based education is gaining a growing popularity in fields as diverse as, for example, software engineering, pedagogy and medical studies. In practice-based education learning takes place across different learning arenas and requires cooperation among all the actors involved in the learning process. However, mobility of students across these arenas impact deeply on cooperation patterns, and therefore on the learning process. In this paper we investigate the usage of shared display systems to promote cooperation among students in practice-based education. Our focus is on teacher education and the paper is based on our experiences with the teacher education programme at our university. Based on our observations of students out in practice, we discuss the importance of common spaces and the role of bulletin boards of different types. We then define high-level requirements for a shared display system to support practice-based education and we illustrate the main concepts with a demonstrator. Strengths and weaknesses of our approach are pointed out through an evaluation of the demonstrator. [source]


    Using computer conferencing and case studies to enable collaboration between expert and novice teachers

    JOURNAL OF COMPUTER ASSISTED LEARNING, Issue 2 2005
    Eileen C. Winter
    Abstract This paper reports on a teaching innovation where groups of experienced and novice teachers collaborated in analyzing case studies involving the education of students with special learning needs. The teachers collaborated in an asynchronous computer conferencing system (Web Knowledge Forum). All participants were enrolled in special education graduate courses taught by the authors. The authors discuss the use of case studies in teacher education, collaboration between novice and expert teachers, and highlight some of the demands of computer conferencing particularly in relation to the loss of face-to-face interactions and the interpretive demands of electronic communication. [source]


    Making formative assessment discernable to pre-service teachers of science

    JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 4 2010
    Gayle A. Buck
    Abstract The purpose of this pragmatic action research study was to explore our re-conceptualization efforts in preparing pre-service teachers to guide the inquiry process with formative assessment and subsequently use the understandings to improve our teacher preparation program. The process was guided by two questions: to what extent did course re-conceptualization efforts lead to a more informed understanding of formative assessment by pre-service teachers and did strategies enacted in the re-conceptualized methods course foster or hinder pre-service teachers' understanding of formative assessment? Data from this study support the following findings: (1) a substantial pre- to post-methods course difference was realized in the pre-service teachers' understanding of formative assessment; (2) explicit and contextualized approaches to formative assessment in the methods course led to increased understandings by pre-service teachers; (3) an implicit approach led to improvements in course structure but did not foster pre-service teachers' understanding of the reflexive nature of formative assessment; and (4) a field-based case study on elementary science teaching both hindered and fostered our efforts with formative assessment. This study yields implications for pre-service teacher education on formative assessment. To foster pre-service teachers' knowledge and skills, we suggest explicit instruction on formative assessment combined with case studies, field experiences, and ongoing reflection. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 47: 402,421, 2010 [source]


    Confronting assumptions, biases, and stereotypes in preservice teachers' conceptualizations of science teaching through the use of book club

    JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 9 2009
    Felicia Moore Mensah
    Abstract This study focuses on the structure and theoretical foundations of the book club for promoting multicultural understandings in science teacher education. The book club was defined as an informal, peer-directed group discussion that met regularly to discuss an ethnographic, multicultural text regarding issues pertinent to science teaching and learning in urban classrooms. Twenty-three preservice teachers (PSTs) enrolled in a 16-week elementary science methods course at a large urban university participated in the study. From the qualitative analyses of PSTs' written reflections and researcher journal notes, five themes which emphasize Individual, Collaborative, and Collective learning are presented. These findings highlight how the book club structure and theoretical foundation fostered critical, reflective inquiry and served as a method for effecting ideological change which is needed in order to embrace issues of diversity in urban science education. Implications for science teacher education concerning the relevancy of pedagogical strategies, the use of multiple theoretical perspectives, and the book club as a strategy in teacher education and urban education are discussed. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 46: 1041,1066, 2009 [source]


    Elementary teachers' epistemological and ontological understanding of teaching for conceptual learning

    JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 9 2007
    Nam-Hwa Kang
    The purpose of this study was to examine the ways in which elementary teachers applied their understanding of conceptual learning and teaching to their instructional practices as they became knowledgeable about conceptual change pedagogy. Teachers' various ways to interpret and utilize students' prior ideas were analyzed in both epistemological and ontological dimensions of learning. A total of 14 in-service elementary teachers conducted an 8-week-long inquiry into students' conceptual learning as a professional development course project. Major data sources included the teachers' reports on their students' prior ideas, lesson plans with justifications, student performance artifacts, video-recorded teaching episodes, and final reports on their analyses of student learning. The findings demonstrated three epistemologically distinct ways the teachers interpreted and utilized students' prior ideas. These supported Kinchin's epistemological categories of perspectives on teaching including positivist, misconceptions, and systems views. On the basis of Chi's and Thagard's theories of conceptual change, the teachers' ontological understanding of conceptual learning was differentiated in two ways. Some teachers taught a unit to change the ontological nature of student ideas, whereas the others taught a unit within the same ontological categories of student ideas. The findings about teachers' various ways of utilizing students' prior ideas in their instructional practices suggested a number of topics to be addressed in science teacher education such as methods of utilizing students' cognitive resources, strategies for purposeful use of counter-evidence, and understanding of ontological demands of learning. Future research questions were suggested. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 44: 1292,1317, 2007 [source]


    One course is not enough: Preservice elementary teachers' retention of improved views of nature of science

    JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 2 2006
    Valarie L. Akerson
    This study examined the views, and the retention of these views, of 19 preservice elementary teachers as they learned about nature of science (NOS). The preservice teachers participated in a cohort group as they took a science methods course during which they received explicit reflective instruction in nature of science. Through Views of Nature of Science version B (VNOS-B) surveys and interviews it was found that most preservice teachers held inadequate ideas of nature of science prior to instruction, but improved their views after one semester of instruction in the science methods course. However, 5 months after instruction, the graduate preservice teachers were again interviewed and it was found that several of the students reverted back to their earlier views. The results are interpreted through Perry's scheme, and implications and recommendations for elementary science teacher education are made. 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 43: 194,213, 2006 [source]


    Undergraduates' attitudes and beliefs about subject matter and pedagogy measured periodically in a reform-based mathematics and science teacher preparation program

    JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 8 2002
    J. Randy McGinnis
    This study describes the design and use of a valid and reliable instrument to measure teacher candidates' attitudes and beliefs about mathematics and science and the teaching of those subjects. The instrument, Attitudes and Beliefs about the Nature of and the Teaching of Mathematics and Science, was developed for the Maryland Collaborative for Teacher Preparation (MCTP), a statewide, standards-based project in the National Science Foundation's Collaborative in Excellence in Teaching Preparation (CETP) Program. We report on two applications of the instrument: (a) a contrast between MCTP teacher candidates' and non-MCTP teacher candidates' attitudes and beliefs about mathematics and science as they initially encountered reform-based instruction in their undergraduate courses, and (b) a landscaping of how the MCTP teacher candidates' attitudes toward and beliefs about mathematics and science evolved over a 2.5-year period. In support of current reform in science and mathematics teacher education, we determined that over an extended period the MCTP teacher candidates' attitudes and beliefs moved substantively and significantly in the direction intended. However, we also found that the non-MCTP teacher candidates in the same reform-based courses did not mirror this improvement in their attitudes and beliefs about mathematics and science or the teaching of those subjects. 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 39: 713,737, 2002 [source]


    Instructional Pragmatics: Bridging Teaching, Research, and Teacher Education

    LINGUISTICS & LANGUAGE COMPASS (ELECTRONIC), Issue 10 2010
    Noriko Ishihara
    Pragmatics deals with meaning in context that is the meaning conveyed often indirectly beyond what is literally communicated. Ever since Hymes (1972, Sociolinguistics: Selected readings, Penguin, Harmondsworth, England, 269,93) highlighted the importance of socially appropriate language use, ability to use language in context has been identified as an essential component of communicative competence (e.g., Canale and Swain, 1980, Applied Linguistics, 1: 1,47; Canale, 1983, Language and communication, Longman, Harlow; Bachman, 1990, Fundamental considerations in language testing, Oxford University Press, Oxford; Bachman & Palmer, 1996, Language testing in practice: Designing and developing useful language tests, Oxford University Press, Oxford; Celce-Murcia, 2008, Intercultural language use and language learning, Springer, The Netherlands, 41,58; Celce-Murcia et al. 1995, Issues in Applied Linguistics, 6: 5,35), and there has been rigorous research investigating the pragmatic competence of second/foreign language (L2) learners. This paper aims to provide an overview of research conducted in the area of interlanguage pragmatics with a focus on its pedagogical component, instructional pragmatics. The primary emphasis of this paper will be placed on the introduction of current resources in instructional pragmatics and recent efforts that empirically inform pragmatic-focused instruction and classroom-based assessment. The paper concludes with the discussion of the issues associated with future pragmatics-focused instruction and curriculum development, along with a suggested direction for future research and teacher education in support of instructional pragmatics. [source]


    Toward a Socioliterate Approach to Second Language Teacher Education

    MODERN LANGUAGE JOURNAL, Issue 3 2002
    John S. Hedgcock
    This article proposes that effective language teacher preparation should facilitate candidates' access to the shared knowledge, discursive practices, and instructional processes of language teaching (LT) as an inherently disparate discipline. Whereas the reflective orientation widely embraced in North American teacher education programs should be preserved, reflective practice should be promoted within a socioliterate framework. The author explores the position that teacher education must be grounded partly (though not exclusively) in what is commonly called "theory," but that this theoretical dimension should be developed by systematically examining socioeducational practices. A genre,based, sociorhetorical approach to LT discourse, it is argued, can build candidates' awareness of knowledge,construction practices, enhance their declarative knowledge, and develop their professional skills. By modeling analytic and reflective processes that focus on disciplinary knowledge, teacher education can help LT candidates to shape their own professional literacies, enabling them to participate meaningfully in the profession's many conversations. [source]


    Old school crossings: Hip hop in teacher education and beyond

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR ADULT & CONTINUING EDUCATION, Issue 115 2007
    Mary Stone Hanley
    This chapter discusses how to draw on hip hop as a culturally relevant tool for teaching educators and adult learners to read the word, the world, and the media. [source]


    Scientifically Debased Research on Learning, 1854,2006

    ANTHROPOLOGY & EDUCATION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2007
    Ray Mcdermott
    By its emphasis on arbitrary standards and misleading systems of accountability, the No Child Left Behind Act has had deleterious effects on classroom practice, teacher education, and even educational research. The new constraints on educational research, driven by a logic of randomized field tests, are part of a larger and more invidious international managerialism that subordinates individual biographies to state-based bureaucratic control. [source]


    One-Way Ticket: A Story of an Innovative Teacher in Mainland China

    ANTHROPOLOGY & EDUCATION QUARTERLY, Issue 4 2000
    Associate Professor Huhua Ouyang
    This article is based on a true story about a Chinese teacher who applied an innovative pedagogy in her rural hometown in mainland China. It unfolds the highly complex and often dangerous remaking of ideologies and power relations inherent in pedagogical reform as a microcosm of other concomitant changes in the society at large. It also reflects the inadequacy of teacher education in preparing teachers to survive the micropolitics of the seemingly neutral or beneficial-to-all education reform. [source]