Tank Bioreactor (tank + bioreactor)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Tank Bioreactor

  • stirred tank bioreactor


  • Selected Abstracts


    Improved ,-Glucanase Production by a Recombinant Escherichia coli Strain using Zinc-Ion Supplemented Medium

    ENGINEERING IN LIFE SCIENCES (ELECTRONIC), Issue 3 2007
    U. Beshay
    Abstract In order to investigate the suitability of different metal chelates for affinity chromatography, an expression vector was constructed. It contained a hybrid ,-glucanase as a model protein fused with a His6 -tag and a secretion cassette providing the ability to secrete ,-glucanase into the culture medium. Supplementation of zinc to the medium led to a rapidly increased expression and release of the target protein into the cultivation medium. Results in respect to the supplementation of the commonly used Terrific Broth "TB-medium" with different metal ions are reported with special emphasis on the influence of zinc ions. A concentration of zinc ions in the order of about 0.175 mM led to optimal results. Batch cultivation under well-controlled conditions showed that the growth behavior did not change significantly by adding zinc ions. Growth in a stirred tank bioreactor was much faster in unsupplemented TB-medium compared to shake flask experiments leading to a much higher biomass concentration (15,g/L instead of 3,g/L). The secretion of ,-glucanase under theses conditions started at the transition into the stationary phase and increased to yield an extracellular activity of 1350,U/mL at the end of the fermentation process. An even higher yield of extracellular ,-glucanase (2800,U/mL) was reached when the fermentation was carried out with TB-medium supplemented with 0.175,mM ZnSO4. [source]


    New milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactors for the cultivation of mycelium forming microorganisms

    BIOTECHNOLOGY & BIOENGINEERING, Issue 3 2010
    Ralf Hortsch
    Abstract A novel milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor was developed for the cultivation of mycelium forming microorganisms on a 10 milliliter-scale. A newly designed one-sided paddle impeller is driven magnetically and rotates freely on an axis in an unbaffled reaction vessel made of polystyrene. A rotating lamella is formed which spreads out along the reactor wall. Thus an enhanced surface-to-volume ratio of the liquid phase is generated where oxygen is introduced via surface aeration. Volumetric oxygen transfer coefficients (kLa),>,0.15,s,1 were measured. The fast moving liquid lamella efficiently prevents wall growth and foaming. Mean power consumption and maximum local energy dissipation were measured as function of operating conditions in the milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor (V,=,10,mL) and compared to a standard laboratory-scale stirred tank bioreactor with six-bladed Rushton turbines (V,=,2,000,mL). Mean power consumption increases with increasing impeller speed and shows the same characteristics and values on both scales. The maximum local energy dissipation of the milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor was reduced compared to the laboratory-scale at the same mean volumetric power input. Hence the milliliter impeller distributes power more uniformly in the reaction medium. Based on these data a reliable and robust scale-up of fermentation processes is possible. This was demonstrated with the cultivation of the actinomycete Streptomyces tendae on both scales. It was shown that the process performances were equivalent with regard to biomass concentration, mannitol consumption and production of the pharmaceutical relevant fungicide nikkomycin Z up to a process time of 120,h. A high parallel reproducibility was observed on the milliliter-scale (standard deviation,<,8%) with up to 48 stirred tank bioreactors operated in a magnetic inductive drive. Rheological behavior of the culture broth was measured and showed a highly viscous shear-thinning non-Newtonian behavior. The newly developed one-sided paddle impellers operated in unbaffled reactors on a 10 milliliter-scale with a magnetic inductive drive for up to 48 parallel bioreactors allows for the first time the parallel bioprocess development with mycelium forming microorganisms. This is especially important since these kinds of cultivations normally exhibit process times of 100,h and more. Thus the operation of parallel stirred tank reactors will have the potential to reduce process development times drastically. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2010; 106: 443,451. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


    Power consumption and maximum energy dissipation in a milliliter-scale bioreactor

    BIOTECHNOLOGY PROGRESS, Issue 2 2010
    Ralf Hortsch
    Abstract Mean power consumption and maximum local energy dissipation were measured as function of operating conditions of a milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor (V = 12 mL) with a gas-inducing impeller. A standard laboratory-scale stirred tank bioreactor (V = 1,200 mL) with Rushton turbines was used as reference. The measured power characteristics (Newton number as function of Reynolds number) were the same on both scales. The changeover between laminar and turbulent flow regime was observed at a Reynolds number of 3,000 with the gas-inducing stirrer on a milliliter-scale. The Newton number (power number) in the turbulent flow regime was 3.3 on a milliliter-scale, which is close to values reported for six-blade Rushton turbines of standard bioreactors. Maximum local energy dissipation (,max) was measured using a clay/polymer flocculation system. The maximum local energy dissipation in the milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor was reduced compared with the laboratory-scale stirred tank at the same mean power input per unit mass (,), yielding ,max/, , 10 compared with ,max/, , 16. Hence, the milliliter-scale stirred tank reactor distributes power more uniformly in the reaction medium. These results are in good agreement with literature data, where a decreasing ,max/, with increasing ratio of impeller diameter to reactor diameter is found (d/D = 0.7 compared with d/D = 0.4). Based on these data, impeller speeds can now be easily adjusted to achieve the same maximum local energy dissipation at different scales. This enables a more reliable and robust scale-up of bioprocesses from milliliter-scale to liter-scale reactors. 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2010 [source]


    Growth inhibition of dinoflagellate algae in shake flasks: Not due to shear this time!

    BIOTECHNOLOGY PROGRESS, Issue 1 2010
    Weiwei Hu
    Abstract Large scale algae cultures present interesting challenges in that they exhibit characteristics of typical bacterial and animal cell cultures. One current commercial food additive, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), is produced using the dinoflagellate algae, Crypthecodiniumcohnii. Like animal cell culture, the perceived sensitivity of algae culture to hydrodynamic forces has potentially limited the agitation and aeration applied to these systems. However, the high density cultivation of C. cohnii required for an economically feasible process inevitably results in high oxygen demand. In this study, we demonstrated what first appeared to be a problem with shear sensitivity in shake flasks is most probably a mass transfer limitation. We subsequently demonstrated the limit of chronic and rapid energy dissipation rate, EDR, that C. cohnii cells can experience. This limit was determined using a microfluidic device connected in a recirculation loop to a stirred tank bioreactor, which has been previously used to repeatedly expose animal cells to high levels of EDR. Inhibition of cell growth was observed when C. cohnii cells were subjected to an EDR of 5.9 106 W/m3 with an average frequency of 0.2/min or more. This level of EDR is sufficiently high that C. cohnii can withstand typically encountered hydrodynamic forces in bioprocesses. This result suggests that at least one dinoflagellate algae, C. cohnii, is quite robust with respect to hydrodynamic forces and the scale-up of process using this type of algae should be more concerned with providing sufficient gas transfer given the relatively high oxygen demand. 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2010 [source]


    New milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactors for the cultivation of mycelium forming microorganisms

    BIOTECHNOLOGY & BIOENGINEERING, Issue 3 2010
    Ralf Hortsch
    Abstract A novel milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor was developed for the cultivation of mycelium forming microorganisms on a 10 milliliter-scale. A newly designed one-sided paddle impeller is driven magnetically and rotates freely on an axis in an unbaffled reaction vessel made of polystyrene. A rotating lamella is formed which spreads out along the reactor wall. Thus an enhanced surface-to-volume ratio of the liquid phase is generated where oxygen is introduced via surface aeration. Volumetric oxygen transfer coefficients (kLa),>,0.15,s,1 were measured. The fast moving liquid lamella efficiently prevents wall growth and foaming. Mean power consumption and maximum local energy dissipation were measured as function of operating conditions in the milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor (V,=,10,mL) and compared to a standard laboratory-scale stirred tank bioreactor with six-bladed Rushton turbines (V,=,2,000,mL). Mean power consumption increases with increasing impeller speed and shows the same characteristics and values on both scales. The maximum local energy dissipation of the milliliter-scale stirred tank bioreactor was reduced compared to the laboratory-scale at the same mean volumetric power input. Hence the milliliter impeller distributes power more uniformly in the reaction medium. Based on these data a reliable and robust scale-up of fermentation processes is possible. This was demonstrated with the cultivation of the actinomycete Streptomyces tendae on both scales. It was shown that the process performances were equivalent with regard to biomass concentration, mannitol consumption and production of the pharmaceutical relevant fungicide nikkomycin Z up to a process time of 120,h. A high parallel reproducibility was observed on the milliliter-scale (standard deviation,<,8%) with up to 48 stirred tank bioreactors operated in a magnetic inductive drive. Rheological behavior of the culture broth was measured and showed a highly viscous shear-thinning non-Newtonian behavior. The newly developed one-sided paddle impellers operated in unbaffled reactors on a 10 milliliter-scale with a magnetic inductive drive for up to 48 parallel bioreactors allows for the first time the parallel bioprocess development with mycelium forming microorganisms. This is especially important since these kinds of cultivations normally exhibit process times of 100,h and more. Thus the operation of parallel stirred tank reactors will have the potential to reduce process development times drastically. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2010; 106: 443,451. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


    Design of a Tubular Loop Bioreactor for Scale-up and Scale-down of Fermentation Processes

    BIOTECHNOLOGY PROGRESS, Issue 5 2003
    Maria Papagianni
    Microorganisms traveling through circulation loops in large-scale bioreactors experience variations in their environment such as dissolved oxygen concentration and pH gradients. The same changes are not experienced in small bioreactors, and it is suggested that herein lies one of the major reasons for the problems encountered when translating fermentation data from one scale to another. One approach to study this problem is to look at the circulation loop itself. The present work concerns an attempt to simulate the circulation loops inside stirred tank reactors, using a tubular loop reactor specially constructed for the purpose. The reactor carries a number of ports and probes along its length for the determination of concentration gradients within. The broth is circulated around the loop by the use of peristaltic pumps, and the circulation time (tc, s) is used as a measure of simulated reactor size. The reactor system has been evaluated using the citric acid fermentation by Aspergillus niger as a test process. Acid production and fungal morphology, in terms of the mean convex perimeter of mycelial clumps quantified by image analysis, were used as the parameters of evaluation for the two systems in comparison. From comparative experiments carried out in 10 and 200 L stirred tank bioreactors, it appears that the loop reactor simulates the corresponding stirred tank representing a valuable tool in scaling up and scaling down of fermentation process. [source]


    Effects of Three-Dimensional Culturing on Osteosarcoma Cells Grown in a Fibrous Matrix: Analyses of Cell Morphology, Cell Cycle, and Apoptosis

    BIOTECHNOLOGY PROGRESS, Issue 5 2003
    Chunnuan Chen
    Osteosarcoma cells were cultured in stirred tank bioreactors with either a fibrous matrix or nonporous microcarriers to study the environmental effects on cell growth, morphology, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed using flow cytometry and visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. The three-dimensional (3-D) fibrous culture had better cell growth and higher metabolic rates than the two-dimensional (2-D) microcarrier culture because cells in the fibrous matrix were protected from shear stress and had lower apoptosis and cell death even under suboptimal conditions (e.g., nutrient depletion). The polyester fibrous matrix used in this study also exhibited the capability of selectively retaining viable and nonapoptotic cells and disposing apoptotic and nonviable cells. Consequently, very few apoptotic cells were found in the fibrous matrix even in the long-term (1 month) T-flask culture. In the continuous culture with packed fibrous matrixes for cell support, most cells were arrested in the G1/G0 phase after 4 days. Decreasing the dissolved oxygen level from 60 to 10% air saturation did not significantly change cell cycle and apoptosis, which remained low at ,15%. These results could explain why the fibrous bed bioreactor had good long-term stability and was advantageous for production of non-growth-associated proteins by animal cell cultures. [source]