Supply Schedule (supply + schedule)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


THE EFFECTS OF THE 1.03 MILLION YEN CEILING IN A DYNAMIC LABOR SUPPLY MODEL

CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC POLICY, Issue 2 2009
YUKIKO ABE
In this paper I examine the effects of a means-tested transfer system in Japan ("1.03 million yen ceiling") in a dynamic labor supply model with endogenous retirement. In Japan, married women have reason to limit their annual earnings to no more than 1.03 million yen in order to receive a number of benefits available to low-income wives, and in fact often choose to do so. In a dynamic model, the optimal labor supply schedule follows a pattern that is not seen in a static framework, which I call the "spillover effect." The paper also examines the properties of dynamic welfare cost of this ceiling. (JEL J22, H24, H55) [source]


Is the Lending Channel of Monetary Policy Dominant in Australia?

THE ECONOMIC RECORD, Issue 249 2004
Tomoya Suzuki
The transmission process of monetary policy is a longstanding macroeconomic issue. The lending view is that a monetary tightening affects aggregate demand by shifting the supply schedule of bank loans left. The contraction of bank loans does not necessarily mean a shift of the supply schedule. Therefore, testing the lending view requires the identification of the shifts of the demand and supply schedules in the bank loan market. This paper employs an original approach, finding that the lending channel is not dominant in Australia. The paper also examines features of Australian banks' behaviour which make the lending channel less dominant. [source]


Progressive Taxes and the Labour Market: Is the Trade,off Between Equality and Efficiency Inevitable?

JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC SURVEYS, Issue 1 2002
Knut Rĝed
Does an income tax harm economic efficiency more the more progressive it is? Public economics provides a strong case for a definite ,yes'. But at least three forces may pull in the other direction. First, low,wage workers may on average have more elastic labour supply schedules than high,wage workers, in which case progressive taxes contribute to a more efficient allocation of the total tax burden. Second, in non,competitive labour markets, progressive taxes may encourage wage moderation, and hence reduce the equilibrium level of unemployment. And third, if wage setters have egalitarian objectives, progressive taxes may reduce the need for redistribution in pre,tax wages, and hence increase the demand for low,skilled workers. This paper surveys the theoretical, as well as the empirical literature about labour supply, taxes and wage setting. We conclude that in a second best world, the trade,off between equality and efficiency is not always inevitable. [source]


Is the Lending Channel of Monetary Policy Dominant in Australia?

THE ECONOMIC RECORD, Issue 249 2004
Tomoya Suzuki
The transmission process of monetary policy is a longstanding macroeconomic issue. The lending view is that a monetary tightening affects aggregate demand by shifting the supply schedule of bank loans left. The contraction of bank loans does not necessarily mean a shift of the supply schedule. Therefore, testing the lending view requires the identification of the shifts of the demand and supply schedules in the bank loan market. This paper employs an original approach, finding that the lending channel is not dominant in Australia. The paper also examines features of Australian banks' behaviour which make the lending channel less dominant. [source]