Supply Networks (supply + network)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Supply Networks: Theories and Models,

JOURNAL OF SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2009
THOMAS Y. CHOI
[source]


A Taxonomy of Supply Networks

JOURNAL OF SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2001
Christine M. Harland
SUMMARY There has been limited research into how different types of supply networks can be created and operated. This article develops a taxonomy of supply networks with a particular focus on managing network creation and operation. The taxonomy is based on a review of network literature from various academic perspectives and extensive empirical data across a variety of industry sectors including automotive, fast-moving consumer goods, electronics, pharmaceuticals, and communications technologies. The main differentiating factors for classifying a matrix of four types of supply network are found to be the degree of supply network dynamics and the degree of focal company supply network influence. Network characteristics and different patterns ofnetworking activities are identified for each type of supply network. [source]


A Conceptual Model for Researching the Creation and Operation of Supply Networks,

BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 1 2004
Christine Harland
This paper presents a conceptual model for the creation and operation of supply networks. Existing conceptual research relating to interorganizational relationships and networks is reviewed in terms of its relevance to understanding supply networks; this research is drawn from the fields of strategic management, channel management, industrial marketing and purchasing, organizational behaviour and supply-chain management. The different perspectives each field has on networks are highlighted. Contributions made by each in assisting to understand supply networks are discussed and synthesized. Findings from an exploratory survey are used to structure the design of a conceptual model for analysing the processes involved in the creation and operation of supply networks. The authors identify nine different types of networking activities and discuss the nature of these activities in the context of supply. Four different types of contextual factors relating to supply networks are identified. The model is tested in eight in-depth case studies and a validating survey of 58 focal firm networks. It is concluded that it provides a robust structure that enabled complex, cross-case analysis of multi-variable, multi-disciplinary data from interorganization product/service supply networks, but that further testing by other researchers is required. [source]


STRUCTURAL EMBEDDEDNESS AND SUPPLIER MANAGEMENT: A NETWORK PERSPECTIVE,

JOURNAL OF SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2008
THOMAS Y. CHOI
The concept of structural embeddedness refers to the importance of framing suppliers as being embedded in larger supply networks rather than in isolation. Such framing helps buying companies create more realistic policies and strategies when managing their suppliers. Simply put, the performance of a supplier is dependent on its own supply networks. By adopting the concept of structural embeddedness, we learn that a buying company needs to look at a supplier's extended supply network to arrive at a more complete evaluation of that supplier's performance. By doing so, a buying company may do a better job of selecting suppliers for long-term relationships and may also find value in maintaining relationships with poorly performing suppliers who may potentially act as a conduit to other companies with technological and innovative resources. [source]


A Taxonomy of Supply Networks

JOURNAL OF SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2001
Christine M. Harland
SUMMARY There has been limited research into how different types of supply networks can be created and operated. This article develops a taxonomy of supply networks with a particular focus on managing network creation and operation. The taxonomy is based on a review of network literature from various academic perspectives and extensive empirical data across a variety of industry sectors including automotive, fast-moving consumer goods, electronics, pharmaceuticals, and communications technologies. The main differentiating factors for classifying a matrix of four types of supply network are found to be the degree of supply network dynamics and the degree of focal company supply network influence. Network characteristics and different patterns ofnetworking activities are identified for each type of supply network. [source]


The scope, motivation and dynamic of Guest Engineering

R & D MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2001
Michael Lewis
The exchange of technical personnel between organizational actors in a supply network has become known as Guest Engineering (GE). Despite increasing popularity as an inter-organisational arrangement (especially in the automotive sector) it has generated relatively little academic research and therefore this paper seeks to extend our understanding of GE by exploring how its scope is determined, what motivates the participants and how the relationships evolve. The paper draws on extant GE, supply networks and Resource-Based View (RBV) literature to derive research propositions that are used to analyse empirical work carried out with four automotive suppliers and four automotive OEMs. A number of preliminary conclusions are drawn. At a micro-project level, the criticality of the individual ,playing the GE role' is highlighted, as are related concerns that collaborative team structures often fail to address broader social/cultural characteristics. At a macro-project level, the study argues that difficulties and mistrust will often characterise integrated and competitively successful GE relationships. Finally, at a strategic level, GE needs to be understood as a process of resource transfer and transformation, and therefore the management of interdependency and power asymmetry are core considerations in effective adoption. The paper concludes with recommendations for further critical and practical work. [source]


Developing the Concept of Transparency for Use in Supply Relationships

BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2004
Richard Lamming
Management concern surrounding the supply of goods and services from business to business, and the related attempts to understand the phenomena observed therein, appears to rest upon a broad range of incompatible perspectives, from political science (often limited to considerations of power) to the logistical (akin to manipulation of a great, benign but dynamic jigsaw puzzle). It appears that all perspectives abrade against the difficulties of exchanging information, knowledge and innovation within the relationships between buying and selling organizations and the apparent chronic systemic inefficiency that transactions often represent in this context. This article addresses these concerns, exploring the concept of transparency and the developments necessary for it to be useful in exchanging sensitive information and tacit knowledge in supply relationships. Our central concern is how the understanding of transparency and its commercial importance may change when it is expressed as a manageable element of the relationship between two organizations rather than as a general property of a broader system (e.g. a supply network, industrial sub-sector, geographical cluster) and what utility this differentiation might hold for managers. The conclusion to the article, and the implication for managers, is that transparency might indeed be created and usefully managed within supply relationships but that it would differ fundamentally in meaning from previously posited concepts, with the same name, in different contexts. [source]


Organizational Challenges and Strategic Responses of Retail TNCs in Post-WTO-Entry China

ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY, Issue 1 2009
Wance Tacconelli
abstract In the context of a market characterized by the enduring legacy of socialism through governmental ownership of retail businesses, the continued presence of domestic retailers, and increasing levels of competition, this article examines the organizational challenges faced by, and the strategic responses adopted by, a group of leading food and general merchandise retail transnational corporations (TNCs) in developing networks of stores in the post-WTO-entry Chinese market. On the basis of extensive interview-based fieldwork conducted in China from 2006 to 2008, the article details the attempts of these retail TNCs to embed their operations in Chinese logistics and supply networks, real estate markets, and consumer cultures,three dimensions that are fundamental to the achievement of market competitiveness by the retail TNCs. The article illustrates how this process of territorial embeddedness presents major challenges for the retail TNCs and how their strategic responses vary substantially, indicating different routes to the achievement of organizational legitimacy in China. The article concludes by offering an analysis of the various strategic responses of the retail TNCs and by suggesting some future research propositions on the globalization of the retail industry. [source]


Information, labelling, and vertical coordination: an analysis of the Italian meat supply networks

AGRIBUSINESS : AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL, Issue 3 2008
Alessandro Banterle
After the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) crisis, the European Union (EU) introduced mandatory and voluntary labelling for meat products to reduce the food safety concerns of consumers and to ensure a better distribution of liability among agents of the meat supply chain. The purpose of this article is to evaluate whether voluntary traceability labelling, introduced by Regulation 1760/2000, can be considered a useful instrument for both the producers and consumers of meat products. Attention is focused on the vertical coordination effects of introducing voluntary labelling along the beef chain and on the interest the Italian consumer shows in labelled information on meat products. Two surveys were conducted: one addressing Italian meat organizations that signed voluntary labelling agreements and the other a sample of 1,025 Italian consumers. With regard to supply, the survey revealed that improved traceability led to a better redistribution of liability among the agents of the meat supply chain and to a strengthening of vertical agreements. Regarding the consumers, the results showed a notable consumer interest in the labelled information such as the meat origin and the information related to the system of cattle breeding, cattle feeding, and the date of slaughtering. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., [source]


STRUCTURAL EMBEDDEDNESS AND SUPPLIER MANAGEMENT: A NETWORK PERSPECTIVE,

JOURNAL OF SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2008
THOMAS Y. CHOI
The concept of structural embeddedness refers to the importance of framing suppliers as being embedded in larger supply networks rather than in isolation. Such framing helps buying companies create more realistic policies and strategies when managing their suppliers. Simply put, the performance of a supplier is dependent on its own supply networks. By adopting the concept of structural embeddedness, we learn that a buying company needs to look at a supplier's extended supply network to arrive at a more complete evaluation of that supplier's performance. By doing so, a buying company may do a better job of selecting suppliers for long-term relationships and may also find value in maintaining relationships with poorly performing suppliers who may potentially act as a conduit to other companies with technological and innovative resources. [source]


A Taxonomy of Supply Networks

JOURNAL OF SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2001
Christine M. Harland
SUMMARY There has been limited research into how different types of supply networks can be created and operated. This article develops a taxonomy of supply networks with a particular focus on managing network creation and operation. The taxonomy is based on a review of network literature from various academic perspectives and extensive empirical data across a variety of industry sectors including automotive, fast-moving consumer goods, electronics, pharmaceuticals, and communications technologies. The main differentiating factors for classifying a matrix of four types of supply network are found to be the degree of supply network dynamics and the degree of focal company supply network influence. Network characteristics and different patterns ofnetworking activities are identified for each type of supply network. [source]


The scope, motivation and dynamic of Guest Engineering

R & D MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2001
Michael Lewis
The exchange of technical personnel between organizational actors in a supply network has become known as Guest Engineering (GE). Despite increasing popularity as an inter-organisational arrangement (especially in the automotive sector) it has generated relatively little academic research and therefore this paper seeks to extend our understanding of GE by exploring how its scope is determined, what motivates the participants and how the relationships evolve. The paper draws on extant GE, supply networks and Resource-Based View (RBV) literature to derive research propositions that are used to analyse empirical work carried out with four automotive suppliers and four automotive OEMs. A number of preliminary conclusions are drawn. At a micro-project level, the criticality of the individual ,playing the GE role' is highlighted, as are related concerns that collaborative team structures often fail to address broader social/cultural characteristics. At a macro-project level, the study argues that difficulties and mistrust will often characterise integrated and competitively successful GE relationships. Finally, at a strategic level, GE needs to be understood as a process of resource transfer and transformation, and therefore the management of interdependency and power asymmetry are core considerations in effective adoption. The paper concludes with recommendations for further critical and practical work. [source]


A Conceptual Model for Researching the Creation and Operation of Supply Networks,

BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 1 2004
Christine Harland
This paper presents a conceptual model for the creation and operation of supply networks. Existing conceptual research relating to interorganizational relationships and networks is reviewed in terms of its relevance to understanding supply networks; this research is drawn from the fields of strategic management, channel management, industrial marketing and purchasing, organizational behaviour and supply-chain management. The different perspectives each field has on networks are highlighted. Contributions made by each in assisting to understand supply networks are discussed and synthesized. Findings from an exploratory survey are used to structure the design of a conceptual model for analysing the processes involved in the creation and operation of supply networks. The authors identify nine different types of networking activities and discuss the nature of these activities in the context of supply. Four different types of contextual factors relating to supply networks are identified. The model is tested in eight in-depth case studies and a validating survey of 58 focal firm networks. It is concluded that it provides a robust structure that enabled complex, cross-case analysis of multi-variable, multi-disciplinary data from interorganization product/service supply networks, but that further testing by other researchers is required. [source]