Supply Industry (supply + industry)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Supply Industry

  • electricity supply industry


  • Selected Abstracts


    Transmission pricing using the exact power and loss allocation method for bilateral contracts in a deregulated electricity supply industry

    EUROPEAN TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRICAL POWER, Issue 3 2007
    Cattareeya Adsoongnoen
    Abstract This paper proposes a new method based on exact power and loss allocation for bilateral transactions under the enhanced single buyer model in the Thai electricity supply industry (Thai ESI). Generally, a transmission network is designed to transfer mainly active power. The transmission pricing for this active power charge in the Thai ESI comprises three components, namely the transmission use-of-system charge, the connection charge, and the common service charge. However, the calculation of transmission pricing, using marginal cost scheme, might not ensure revenue requirements of the transmission owner in case of a high reactive power demand in the network because a part of transmission line capacity is subsequently required for the reactive power transfer. Thus, the triangle method is used to segregate the transmission pricing by classifying active and reactive charges. The users are charged regarding their system usages by applying the exact power and loss allocation method. The proposed transmission pricing sends economic incentives to the users with fair charges. It ensures an investment recovery of the transmission owner in case of high reactive demand in the network. The Thai power 424-bus network demonstrates the method exemplarily. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Materials and Energy Flow Analysis of Paper Consumption in the United Kingdom, 1987-2010

    JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY, Issue 3 2001
    Erik Sundin
    Summary This article presents the results of a life-cycle materials and energy flow analysis for the pulp and paper cycle in the United Kingdom. Material flows are reconstructed for the period be-tween 1987 and 1996 for all major processes associated with the paper cycle, and system energy requirements are calculated over this period using the best available data. Attention is drawn to the import dependence of U.K. paper demand, and the significant energy requirements associated with upstream forestry processes. The historical trend analysis is then used to model possible future developments in materials and energy consumption until 2010 under a variety of assumptions about process technology improvements, wastepaper utilization rates, and changing demand trends. The results indicate that policy options to increase recycling yield some energy benefits, but these are small by comparison with the benefits to be gained by reducing consumption of paper and improving process technology. The structure of the electricity supply industry in the United Kingdom means that global energy benefits could also be achieved by increasing the contribution from imported pulp. [source]


    THE ,THICK MARKET' EFFECT AND AGGLOMERATION IN HIGH-GROWTH INDUSTRIES

    PACIFIC ECONOMIC REVIEW, Issue 2 2005
    Mikhail M. Klimenko
    In the model, agglomerative effects result from positive feedback between competitive forces in the upstream and downstream segments of a high-technology industry, rather than as a result of traditional scale economies in the manufacturing of standardized products. The model assumes that firms in the upstream service supply industry have ex ante uncertain costs and compete in Bertrand fashion for the independent demands of downstream firms. This framework explains the mechanism of spatial clustering in industries with a high rate of innovation. [source]


    Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Queensland Electricity Supply Industry: Gas and Carbon Tax Scenarios

    THE AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC REVIEW, Issue 3 2004
    Paul Simshauser
    This article examines various greenhouse gas scenarios for the electricity supply industry in the coal-rich state of Queensland. The authors use a dynamic partial equilibrium model of the Queensland electricity system to examine the effects of four alternate policy scenarios: a business-as-usual case, a centrally planned gas-fired case, and two carbon tax scenarios, the first in which the merit order of coal and gas plant is reversed, and the second in which fuel switching is undertaken. The results indicate that no scenario is capable of delivering sufficient cuts in emissions to meet a ,Kyoto equivalent' industry target. While fuel switching brought about the greatest reduction in emissions, the high cost of this scenario indicates that a more efficient outcome for the electricity supply industry in Queensland would be a broad-based Australia-wide approach to emissions abatement, so that carbon reductions can be accessed from industries capable of achieving lower cost emissions abatement. [source]


    Opening up Public Services to Competition by Putting Them Out to Tender: An Evaluation

    ANNALS OF PUBLIC AND COOPERATIVE ECONOMICS, Issue 1 2003
    P. Bance
    This article examines the effects of systematizing tendering procedures when awarding public service concessions. The opening up of the water supply industry to competition is used by way of illustration. Results show that arguments in favour of systematization are not robust when focusing solely on the expected benefits of the liberalization process. The peculiarities of the contract relationship in the delegation of public services, the mobilization of specific assets, and the long duration and incompleteness of the contracts invalidate this type of argument and expose public authorities to the opportunism of operators. The efficiency of awarding public services concessions relies on cost,benefit analysis, taking into account sectoral aspects as well as specificities of the contracting organizations and structures. The public service culture of these organizations is in this respect a key factor in the choice of efficient organizations since it conditions their ability to internalize the mission of fulfilling the public interest. [source]


    Consumer Ownership in Liberalized Electricity Markets.

    ANNALS OF PUBLIC AND COOPERATIVE ECONOMICS, Issue 1 2002
    The Case of Denmark
    The continuation of consumer ownership has been an important part of the Danish electricity reform from 1999. Consumer ownership refers to either a consumer co-operative or a municipal utility. Contrary to conventional wisdom, consumer ownership can be supported by solid arguments from modern economic theory of organization. These arguments are presented and confronted with both present and future situation in Denmark. The development of the electricity supply industry after the Second World War has emptied consumer ownership of much of its original content. Nowadays, most consumers consider their electric utility as the (monopoly) supplier of a good they demand and not as something they own. Therefore, obligatory consumer ownership as specified in the new Danish Electricity Act of 1999 cannot be relied on to guarantee security of supply and reasonable prices for small consumers [source]


    THE PERFORMANCE OF AN ELECTRICITY UTILITY: THE CASE OF THE STATE ELECTRICITY COMMISSION OF VICTORIA, 1925,93

    AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 1 2006
    Malcolm Abbott
    Australia; electricity utility; privatisation; public enterprise; Victoria One of the most important microeconomic policy reforms of the 1990s was the restructuring of the Australian electricity supply industry. This process was encouraged by the perception that the state-owned electricity authorities performed poorly in the 1970s and 1980s. This article observes the long-term performance of the State Electricity Commission of Victoria over the course of most of its life. In particular the growth in demand for electricity in Victoria, the productivity growth of the State Electricity Commission of Victoria, as well as electricity prices, profits and debt levels are presented over the longer term. [source]


    An empirical analysis of green supply chain management in the German automotive industry

    BUSINESS STRATEGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, Issue 2 2010
    Jörn-Henrik Thun
    Abstract The purpose of this paper is the empirical investigation of the status quo of green supply chain management in the German automotive industry from a practitioner's point of view. Several aspects of green supply chain management, such as the point of time of implementation, the driving forces, the relevance of intended goals and their particular realization and the adoption of eco-programs with suppliers and customers as well as internal and external barriers are analyzed. Furthermore, the link to different performance criteria is tested by inductive statistics in order to show the potential of green supply chain management for competitiveness. For this study, managers from the automotive supply industry in Germany were asked about their estimations in this regard. The main conclusion is that managers express the need for green supply chain management on the one hand but also see corresponding problems in terms of required resources on the other hand. Furthermore, the analyses show that green supply chain management leads to higher performance in terms of several performance criteria. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment. [source]