Student Responses (student + response)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Improving Medical Student Attitudes Toward Older Patients Through a "Council of Elders" and Reflective Writing Experience

JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 2 2009
Glenda R. Westmoreland MD
In an effort to reduce "agism" which is prevalent among medical trainees, a new geriatrics educational experience for medical students aimed at improving attitudes toward older patients was developed. Each 90-minute Older Adult Session included four components: initial reflective writing exercise; introduction to the session; 75-minute dialogue with the "Council of Elders," a group of active, "well" older adults; and final reflective writing exercise. The new session was provided to 237 first- and second-year medical students during the 2006/07 academic year at Indiana University School of Medicine. Session evaluation included comparing scores on the 14-item Geriatrics Attitude Scale administered before and after the session, identifying attitude changes in the reflective writing exercises, and a student satisfaction survey. Student responses on the Geriatrics Attitude Scale after the session were significantly improved in seven of 14 items, demonstrating better attitudes toward being with and listening to older people and caring for older patients. Analysis of the reflective writings revealed changing of negative to positive or reinforced positive attitudes in 27% of medical students, with attitudes not discernable in the remaining 73% (except one student, in whom positive attitudes changed to negative). Learner satisfaction with the Older Adult Session was high, with 98% agreeing that the session had a positive effect on insight into the care of older adults. A Council of Elders coupled with a reflective writing exercise is a promising new approach to improving attitudes of medical students toward their geriatric patients. [source]


Role of work permits in teen workers' experiences

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE, Issue 6 2002
Linda Delp MPH
Abstract Background Work permits are required for working teenagers under 18 in 41 US states, but little is known about the work experience of those with work permits compared with those without such permits. This study examines job hazards, training, and knowledge of child labor laws reported by students in a predominantly Latino high school in Los Angeles and compares the responses of those who obtained work permits with those who did not. Methods Student responses to a 60 item questionnaire were supplemented with information from focus groups and a survey of work permits issued by the school. Results Students without work permits were more likely to perform hazardous tasks and to use certain types of dangerous equipment and less likely to receive health and safety training than those with permits. Conclusion Possible explanations for the findings and suggested areas in need of policy change or research are considered. Am. J. Ind. Med. 41:477,482, 2002. 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Teaching the Politics of Obesity: Insights into Neoliberal Embodiment and Contemporary Biopolitics

ANTIPODE, Issue 5 2009
Julie Guthman
Abstract:, This article reflects on the author's experiences teaching an undergraduate lecture course on the politics of obesity. The course involved a critical examination of the construction and representation of the so-called epidemic of obesity and the major causal explanations for the rise in obesity. Students were unusually discomfited by the course and invoked pedagogical concerns and instructor embodiments in expressing their reactions. Student responses demonstrate how obesity talk reflects and reinforces neoliberal rationalities of self-governance, particularly those that couple bodily control and deservingness and see fatness as weakening the health of the body politic. The course also animated many students to scrutinize more deeply their own diet and exercise practices. I argue that the intensity of reaction stems from the productive power of the discourse of obesity and considerable investment students had in their bodies as neoliberal subjects. Besides classroom observations, the data in this paper are taken from student journals. [source]


Interpreting course evaluation results: insights from thinkaloud interviews with medical students

MEDICAL EDUCATION, Issue 10 2004
Susan Billings-Gagliardi
Purpose, To determine whether some of the fundamental assumptions that frequently underlie interpretation of course evaluation results are justified by investigating what medical students are thinking as they complete a typical basic science course evaluation. Methods, A total of 24 students participated in thinkaloud cognitive interviews, voicing their thoughts while completing a typical evaluation instrument that included items on overall course design, educational materials and methods, and faculty teaching. Students' responses were organised to consider how they interpreted questions, formed judgements and selected response options. Major themes relevant to the meaningful interpretation of course evaluation data were identified. Results, Medical students understood educational terms such as ,independent learning' in different ways from both one another and common usage. When formulating responses, students' judgements were sometimes based on unique or unexpected criteria, and they described editing their judgements by considering factors such as effort or caring on the part of teaching faculty. Students tended to avoid using the lower end of the rating scale, used the highest rating option selectively, but chose the second highest category indiscriminately. Conclusions, These results call into question fundamental assumptions that frequently underlie interpretation of course evaluation results, such as whether students understand the intended meanings of terms used in items; whether faculty members who receive the same rating are perceived similarly; whether ratings actually reflect teaching effectiveness, and whether ,positive' ratings reflect positive opinions. This study also demonstrates how thinkaloud interviews can be used in validity studies, providing information to supplement statistical and psychometric analyses. [source]


Considerations in the identification, assessment, and intervention process for deaf and hard of hearing students with reading difficulties

PSYCHOLOGY IN THE SCHOOLS, Issue 2 2008
Donna Gilbertson
Problematic assessment and intervention issues present substantial challenges when making educational decisions for deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) students who are experiencing reading difficulties. These students present a diverse set of language acquisition skills, hearing ability, and orientation to early school learning activities that are different from the hearing student population. Given the importance of selecting assessment approaches that lead to effective interventions for D/HH students, three assessment procedures for identification of at-risk children and learning disabilities within the D/HH population are examined. Assessments reviewed are teacher referral, norm-referenced testing, and student response to intervention. Challenges to each process and the need for additional assessment and empirically validated treatment options are discussed. Finally, a case example is presented to illustrate a framework that may help school psychologists promote early identification of learning problems and outline interventions that meets a D/HH child's unique needs by focusing on reading outcomes in the curriculum. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Using Quality Management Tools to Enhance Feedback from Student Evaluations

DECISION SCIENCES JOURNAL OF INNOVATIVE EDUCATION, Issue 1 2005
John B. Jensen
ABSTRACT Statistical tools found in the service quality assessment literature,the T2 statistic combined with factor analysis,can enhance the feedback instructors receive from student ratings. T2 examines variability across multiple sets of ratings to isolate individual respondents with aberrant response patterns (i.e., outliers). Analyzing student responses that are outside the "normal" range of responses can identify aspects of the course that cause pockets of students to be dissatisfied. This fresh insight into sources of student dissatisfaction is particularly valuable for instructors willing to make tactical classroom changes that accommodate individual students rather than the traditional approach of using student ratings to develop systemwide changes in course delivery. A case study is presented to demonstrate how the recommended procedure minimizes data overload, allows for valid schoolwide and longitudinal comparisons of correlated survey responses, and helps instructors identify priority areas for instructional improvement. [source]


New Routes to the PhD: Cause for Concern?

HIGHER EDUCATION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2004
Bill Johnston
Recent developments suggest that the PhD is at a turning point. Professional groups have criticised the so-called ,traditional PhD'. New routes to the PhD are proposed by several bodies and endorsed by one funding council. In light of these developments, it is appropriate to ask what the implications are for the PhD and for the academy. A focus group was used to gather student responses to these developments. The findings show qualified support: students agree that the PhD should cater for different careers but challenge what they see as a simplistic channelling of PhD routes. This paper demonstrates apparent consensus on the need for change in the PhD and reveals movement beyond reconceptualisation towards reconstruction. However, we argue that there is cause for concern in the lack of attention paid to student views and the continuing neglect of quality issues in the PhD. [source]


Uses and Gratifications of the Web among Students

JOURNAL OF COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION, Issue 1 2000
Samuel Ebersole
This study was designed to explore how some students in ten public schools view the WWW and how their attitudes and opinions affect their use of this new medium in an educational context. An exploratory principal components analysis of forty use statements resulted in an eight factor solution. Additionally, student responses to a computer-administered survey instrument were collected and analyzed revealing significant differences in the way that students describe their use of the WWW. Gender, grade level, and amount of time spent using the WWW were used to create between-group comparisons of the WWW use categories that made up the computer-administered survey instrument. The final phase of data analysis was a content analysis of sites visited by students. A total of 123,071 URLs were collected from the computers used to administer the computer survey instrument. These were reduced to a total of 500 sites that were reviewed by media specialists. Students were found to be visiting commercial sites at a much higher proportion than those in other domains. Also, the commercial sites received the lowest rating for "suitability for academic research" of all the domain names. And while students reported their purpose for using the WWW as "research and learning" fifty-two percent of the time, the coders found only twenty-seven percent of the sampled sites to be "suitable" for that purpose. [source]


Writing Across the Curriculum: A Hermeneutic Study of Students' Experiences in Writing in Food Science Education

JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE EDUCATION, Issue 2 2005
David J. Dzurec
ABSTRACT: Writing can enhance learning by helping students put words to their thinking about course material. The purposes of this study were to assess the influence of a structured academic journal writing exercise on student learning in a food science class and to examine student responses to the experience. Hermeneutics, a philosophy of science and qualitative research method, was used to analyze journal data from 48 participating students during a 2-y period and involved 3 steps: (1) describing themes taken from a global reading of student commentaries, (2) reducing or relating themes to specific, verbatim statements found in student writings, and (3) interpreting or imposing meaning on the themes and the statements (Lanigan 1988). Hermeneutic analysis showed that journal writing was difficult at first but became easier and enjoyable over time, allowed students to relate course content to other knowledge, exposed students to course material multiple times allowing for better information retention, enhanced student understanding, helped students think critically, required students to prepare for class, gave students the opportunity to express opinions, and allowed students to experience writing as enjoyable and positive. Several minor themes suggested that most students found the experience useful to their learning. Findings from this study are consistent with neuroscience and cognitive psychology theories regarding learning and the development of reasoning skills. [source]


A secondary reanalysis of student perceptions of non-traditional writing tasks over a ten year period

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 5 2010
Mark A. McDermott
This study aims to add to the growing research related to the implementation of non-traditional writing tasks in classrooms to encourage science literacy. A secondary reanalysis methodology was employed to review student interviews collected as a part of several individual studies during a ten year research program. This method established an interpretive framework different than the particular frameworks guiding the individual studies. In doing so, a greater ability to generalize findings was sought. Main assertions emerging from the student responses analyzed include recognition of benefits of non-traditional writing, recognition of the need for particular task characteristics to encourage these benefits, and recognition of greater cognitive activity than is present in typical science classroom writing. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 47: 518,539, 2010 [source]


Korean 4- to 11-year-old student conceptions of heat and temperature

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 2 2007
Seoung-Hey Paik
The aim of the present study is to shed light on the conceptions that young students have of heat and temperature, concepts that are both important in school science curricula and closely related to daily life. The subjects of the study were students from a rural district in South Korea and they ranged in age from 4 to 11 years. Interviews were conducted with each student on the basis of questions on temperature, thermal insulation, and heat equilibrium. After calculating the frequency and percentage of student responses and analyzing the rationale for their answers, it was found that younger students tended to view temperature as "size" or a "summation of numbers." This tendency gradually diminished in older students. Most students had alternative conceptions of thermal insulation regardless of age; however, reasoning differed according to age. Younger students displayed a greater tendency to view insulation as a material property, whereas older students showed a greater tendency toward rational heat and temperature conceptions. Most students did not have clear concepts of heat equilibrium regardless of age, but possessed numerous alternative conceptions. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 44: 284,302, 2007 [source]


The black,white "achievement gap" as a perennial challenge of urban science education: A sociocultural and historical overview with implications for research and practice,

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 10 2001
Obed Norman
A perennial challenge for urban education in the United States is finding effective ways to address the academic achievement gap between African American and White students. There is widespread and justified concern about the persistence of this achievement gap. In fact, historical evidence suggests that this achievement gap has existed at various times for groups other than African Americans. What conditions prevailed when this achievement gap existed for these other groups? Conversely, under what conditions did the gap diminish and eventually disappear for these groups? This article explores how sociocultural factors involved in the manifestation and eventual disappearance of the gap for these groups may shed some light on how to address the achievement gap for African American students in urban science classrooms. Our conclusion is that the sociocultural position of groups is crucial to understanding and interpreting the scholastic performance of students from various backgrounds. We argue for a research framework and the exploration of research questions incorporating insights from Ogbu's cultural, ecological theory, as well as goal theory, and identity theory. We present these as theories that essentially focus on student responses to societal disparities. Our ultimate goal is to define the problem more clearly and contribute to the development of research-based classroom practices that will be effective in reducing and eventually eliminating the achievement gap. We identify the many gaps in society and the schools that need to be addressed in order to find effective solutions to the problem of the achievement gap. Finally, we propose that by understanding the genesis of the gap and developing strategies to harness the students' responses to societal disparities, learning can be maximized and the achievement gap can be significantly reduced, if not eliminated entirely, in urban science classrooms. 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 38: 1101,1114, 2001 [source]


"How Come Nobody Told Me?"

LEARNING DISABILITIES RESEARCH & PRACTICE, Issue 1 2002
Fostering Self-Realization Through a High School English Curriculum
Through collaboratively designed qualitative inquiry, we investigated the responses of high school students with learning disabilities to a teacher's intervention intended to promote self-realization, a fundamental component of self-determination. Activities were embedded within the general English curriculum and delivered in a special education classroom over the course of an academic year. Several themes emerged from analysis of student interviews, student responses to writing prompts and surveys, a teacher journal, and student portfolio pieces. Silence and misconceptions were prevalent in student experiences. However, through the intervention students acquired information that helped them make sense of their school experiences, redefine themselves in positive ways, and take small steps toward greater self-advocacy within their current school setting. The mediating influence of positive adult voices and concerns about social stigma were evident in students' responses, which prompted us to question teachers' and families' responsibilities for engaging young people in dialogue about special education and disability. [source]


Faculty members' social identities and classroom authority

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR TEACHING & LEARNING, Issue 111 2007
Mark Chesler
How do faculty members' social group identities influence their choices about how they present themselves and their course materials? How do these identities affect student responses to them and the material they present? [source]


e-Assessment and the student learning experience: A survey of student perceptions of e-assessment

BRITISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, Issue 2 2009
John Dermo
This paper describes a piece of research carried out at the University of Bradford into student perceptions of e-assessment. An online questionnaire was delivered to 130 undergraduates who had taken part in online assessment (either formative or summative) during the academic year 2007,2008. The survey looked at six main dimensions: (1) affective factors, (2) validity, (3) practical issues, (4) reliability, (5) security, and (6) learning and teaching. The aim of the survey was to identify possible risks in planning e-assessments, as well as to gauge student opinion. The findings of the survey indicated a range of opinions across the student body, with greatest concern about the fairness of item banking. It was also found that the most positive aspect of e-assessment in the eyes of students concerned the benefits that it can bring to teaching and learning. In addition, the paper concludes that age and gender did not significantly affect student responses in any of the areas studied. [source]


Exploring teachers' informal formative assessment practices and students' understanding in the context of scientific inquiry

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 1 2007
Maria Araceli Ruiz-Primo
This study explores teachers' informal formative assessment practices in three middle school science classrooms. We present a model for examining these practices based on three components of formative assessment (eliciting, recognizing, and using information) and the three domains linked to scientific inquiry (epistemic frameworks, conceptual structures, and social processes). We describe the informal assessment practices as ESRU cycles,the teacher Elicits a question; the Student responds; the teacher Recognizes the student's response; and then Uses the information collected to support student learning. By tracking the strategies teachers used in terms of ESRU cycles, we were able to capture differences in assessment practices across the three teachers during the implementation of four investigations of a physical science unit on buoyancy. Furthermore, based on information collected in a three-question embedded assessment administered to assess students' learning, we linked students' level of performance to the teachers' informal assessment practices. We found that the teacher who more frequently used complete ESRU cycles had students with higher performance on the embedded assessment as compared with the other two teachers. We conclude that the ESRU model is a useful way of capturing differences in teachers' informal assessment practices. Furthermore, the study suggests that effective informal formative assessment practices may be associated with student learning in scientific inquiry classrooms. 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach [source]


3 Taking a History from the Challenging Patient in the Emergency Department

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 2008
Bruce Becker
This exhibit will use DVD footage, written material, and live real-time interaction to demonstrate an innovative methodology to teaching residents and medical students to gain comfort and expertise in communicating with and taking a history from challenging patients in the ED. I teach this course at our institution every year. Professional actors with improvisational experience play out unscripted interactions with students based on a character or characters, a set scene, and predefined goals and endpoints. Their dialogue and choices evolve from the student's response and the tone, direction, and approach that the student takes. These scenarios are much more realistic and educational than OSCEs which are often described as artificial and flat. Some of the scenarios that I will present include: Daughter trying to make End-of-life choices for her mother, type A man with chest pain trying to sign out, a woman with "dental pain" who is seductive and drug-seeking, an intoxicated attending MD brought in from a motor vehicle crash (MVC) who uses power in a manipulative way. Many of the scenarios contain potential ethical, sexual, gender, racial issues that the student must address along with the medical problems. [source]


Local Heroes, Narrative Worlds and the Imagination: The Making of a Moral Curriculum Through Experiential Narratives

CURRICULUM INQUIRY, Issue 1 2008
CAROLA CONLE
ABSTRACT Concern about the impact of narrative worlds and their heroes offered by the media prompted research on encounters with moral models in experiential, narrative curricula. Researchers tracked the extension of a mandated Language Arts curriculum on "heroes" through the experiential narratives of four local heroes chosen collaboratively by teacher, students and researcher. They also elicited and analyzed responses from students to these narrative presentations in order to explore how students understood the narrative worlds presented to them. Instead of focusing on the personalities of the speakers, the researchers considered the experiential stories, and the moments of narrative encounter they offered, as the sources of immediate moral impact. However, this impact, it is suggested, did not adhere to a particular narrative in an undifferentiated manner. Instead, effects varied according to what a particular student brought to the encounter and how he or she was able to experience it. Material from two students' responses illustrates how they brought their own personal and socio-cultural contexts to the encounter, activating existing dispositions and reinforcing inclinations to behave in certain ways. There was some evidence that the students reconstructed the meaning of events in their lives, were able to interpret their environment in new ways, and constructed visions of possible futures based on this curricular experience. [source]


Facets of private and public self-consciousness: construct and discriminant validity

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 2 2002
Lars Nystedt
The construct and discriminant validity of proposed facets of private self-consciousness (Self-Reflectiveness and Internal State Awareness) and public self-consciousness (Style Consciousness and Appearance Consciousness) was examined in two studies. In study 1 an exploratory factor analysis of 367 subjects' responses to a translated version of the Self-Consciousness Scale (SCS) of Fenigstein, Scheir, and Buss confirmed the existence of two factors of private and public self-consciousness. Confirmatory factor analysis of 199 university students' responses to the SCS confirmed the results from study 1. A two-dimensional model of private and public self-consciousness respectively represented a significant improvement in fit to data over single-factor models. Further, the two facets of private and public self-consciousness were related differently to measures representing different aspects of adjustment/maladjustment. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


The effects of Common Knowledge Construction Model sequence of lessons on science achievement and relational conceptual change

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 1 2010
Jazlin Ebenezer
Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the Common Knowledge Construction Model (CKCM) lesson sequence, an intervention based both in conceptual change theory and in Phenomenography, a subset of conceptual change theory. A mixed approach was used to investigate whether this model had a significant effect on 7th grade students' science achievement and conceptual change. The Excretion Unit Achievement Test (EUAT) indicated that students (N,=,33) in the experimental group achieved significantly higher scores (p,<,0.001) than students in the control group (N,=,35) taught by traditional teaching methods. Qualitative analysis of students' pre- and post-teaching conceptions of excretion revealed (1) the addition and deletion of ideas from pre- to post-teaching; (2) the change in the number of students within categories of ideas; (3) the replacement of everyday language with scientific labels; and (4) the difference in the complexity of students' responses from pre- to post-teaching. These findings contribute to the literature on teaching that incorporates students' conceptions and conceptual change. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 47: 25,46, 2010 [source]


Real world contexts in PISA science: Implications for context-based science education

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 8 2009
Peter J. Fensham
Abstract The PISA assessment instruments for students' scientific literacy in 2000, 2003, and 2006 have each consisted of units made up of a real world context involving Science and Technology, about which students are asked a number of cognitive and affective questions. This article discusses a number of issues from this use of S&T contexts in PISA and the implications they have for the current renewed interest in context-based science education. Suitably chosen contexts can engage both boys and girls. Secondary analyses of the students' responses using the contextual sets of items as the unit of analysis provides new information about the levels of performance in PISA 2006 Science. Embedding affective items in the achievement test did not lead to gender/context interactions of significance, and context interactions were less than competency ones. A number of implications for context-based science teaching and learning are outlined and the PISA 2006 Science test is suggested as a model for its assessment. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 46: 884,896, 2009 [source]


The black,white "achievement gap" as a perennial challenge of urban science education: A sociocultural and historical overview with implications for research and practice,

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 10 2001
Obed Norman
A perennial challenge for urban education in the United States is finding effective ways to address the academic achievement gap between African American and White students. There is widespread and justified concern about the persistence of this achievement gap. In fact, historical evidence suggests that this achievement gap has existed at various times for groups other than African Americans. What conditions prevailed when this achievement gap existed for these other groups? Conversely, under what conditions did the gap diminish and eventually disappear for these groups? This article explores how sociocultural factors involved in the manifestation and eventual disappearance of the gap for these groups may shed some light on how to address the achievement gap for African American students in urban science classrooms. Our conclusion is that the sociocultural position of groups is crucial to understanding and interpreting the scholastic performance of students from various backgrounds. We argue for a research framework and the exploration of research questions incorporating insights from Ogbu's cultural, ecological theory, as well as goal theory, and identity theory. We present these as theories that essentially focus on student responses to societal disparities. Our ultimate goal is to define the problem more clearly and contribute to the development of research-based classroom practices that will be effective in reducing and eventually eliminating the achievement gap. We identify the many gaps in society and the schools that need to be addressed in order to find effective solutions to the problem of the achievement gap. Finally, we propose that by understanding the genesis of the gap and developing strategies to harness the students' responses to societal disparities, learning can be maximized and the achievement gap can be significantly reduced, if not eliminated entirely, in urban science classrooms. 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 38: 1101,1114, 2001 [source]


"How Come Nobody Told Me?"

LEARNING DISABILITIES RESEARCH & PRACTICE, Issue 1 2002
Fostering Self-Realization Through a High School English Curriculum
Through collaboratively designed qualitative inquiry, we investigated the responses of high school students with learning disabilities to a teacher's intervention intended to promote self-realization, a fundamental component of self-determination. Activities were embedded within the general English curriculum and delivered in a special education classroom over the course of an academic year. Several themes emerged from analysis of student interviews, student responses to writing prompts and surveys, a teacher journal, and student portfolio pieces. Silence and misconceptions were prevalent in student experiences. However, through the intervention students acquired information that helped them make sense of their school experiences, redefine themselves in positive ways, and take small steps toward greater self-advocacy within their current school setting. The mediating influence of positive adult voices and concerns about social stigma were evident in students' responses, which prompted us to question teachers' and families' responsibilities for engaging young people in dialogue about special education and disability. [source]


What kind of motivation drives medical students' learning quests?

MEDICAL EDUCATION, Issue 9 2004
Dejano T Sobral
Aims, To describe the patterns of medical students' motivation early in the undergraduate programme and to examine their relationships with learning features and motivational outcomes. Methods, The Academic Motivation Scale (AMS) was administered after the first medical year to 297 students of both sexes from consecutive classes within a 4-year timeframe. Measures of learner orientation and reflection in learning were also obtained. Academic achievement and peer tutoring experience were recorded during a 2-year follow-up. Quantitative approaches included analysis of variance, correlational and classificatory analyses of the data. Results, The profile of the students' responses revealed higher levels of autonomous motivation than of controlled motivation although such measures were positively related. Correlation analysis showed significant association of autonomous motivation with higher levels of meaning orientation, reflection in learning, academic achievement, cross-year peer-tutoring experience, and intention to continue with studies. Classificatory analysis identified 4 student groups with distinct patterns of motivation. Analysis of variance revealed significant and consistent differences in learning features and outcomes among such groups. Conclusions, The findings indicate that medical students portray distinct patterns of autonomous and controlled motivation that seem to relate to the learners' frame of mind towards learning as well as the educational environment. Autonomous motivation had closer relationships than controlled motivation with measures of self-regulation of learning and academic success in the context of a demanding medical programme. [source]


Lessons Learned from Teaching Web-Based Courses: The 7-Year Itch

NURSING FORUM, Issue 1 2005
Cynthia G. Johnson RN
TOPIC.,Lessons Learned from Teaching Web-Based Courses: The 7-Year Itch SOURCES OF INFORMATION.,Increased sophisticated technological communications are rapidly changing the teaching and learning environment. Nursing educators must respond by developing new ways of teaching. Because of these changes, new ways of teaching, course delivery methods, and classroom environments are being discovered. The Internet and the cyberspace environment allow students from all over the nation to sit in the same virtual classroom and ,attend lecture' with one instructor. This article describes lessons learned from seven years of teaching on the web on both undergraduate and graduate levels. CONCLUSION.,The major challenges for faculty relate to the creation of a stimulated learning environment for communication and interaction among the students, course preparation, workload, time management. Additional challenges are the methods of classroom discussions, teaching methods, responding to students, and teaching a 2-unit clinical component on-line. For students, issues of learning styles, motivation, and class participation are discussed. Results of the students' responses to a 10-item Likert,type course evaluation tool as well as issues for future web educators are presented. [source]


Seeing Possible Futures: Khmer Youth and the Discourse of the American Dream

ANTHROPOLOGY & EDUCATION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2009
Theresa A. McGinnis
In this article, I add to the critique of the myth of the American Dream by examining ethnographically the ways its dominant discourse is circulated to Khmer American middle school children of migratory agricultural workers. Drawing on social theories of discourse, I juxtapose the ideology embedded in the American Dream Discourse with the complexities of urban immigrant life. By looking at four Khmer students' worldviews and experiences, I provide a nuanced analysis of the complexities involved in the students' responses to the Discourse. The findings challenge the notion of meritocracy and suggest that educators need to investigate their role in supporting and promoting student agency.,[Khmer American (Cambodian), Discourse, urban education, immigrant student populations] [source]