Stakeholders

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Business, Economics, Finance and Accounting

Kinds of Stakeholders

  • corporate stakeholder
  • different stakeholder
  • external stakeholder
  • important stakeholder
  • key stakeholder
  • local stakeholder
  • many stakeholder
  • multiple stakeholder
  • of stakeholder
  • other stakeholder
  • relevant stakeholder
  • variety of stakeholder
  • various stakeholder

  • Terms modified by Stakeholders

  • stakeholder analysis
  • stakeholder approach
  • stakeholder consultation
  • stakeholder dialogue
  • stakeholder engagement
  • stakeholder group
  • stakeholder groups
  • stakeholder interaction
  • stakeholder interest
  • stakeholder interview
  • stakeholder involvement
  • stakeholder management
  • stakeholder model
  • stakeholder orientation
  • stakeholder participation
  • stakeholder perception
  • stakeholder perspective
  • stakeholder relationships
  • stakeholder satisfaction
  • stakeholder theory
  • stakeholder value
  • stakeholder viewpoint

  • Selected Abstracts


    PARTNERING WITH COMMUNITY STAKEHOLDERS: ENGAGING RURAL AFRICAN AMERICAN FAMILIES IN BASIC RESEARCH AND THE STRONG AFRICAN AMERICAN FAMILIES PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION PROGRAM

    JOURNAL OF MARITAL AND FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 3 2004
    Velma McBride Murry
    The Center for Family Research has implemented the first family-community preventive intervention program designed specifically for rural African American families and youths. Basic information garnered during a decade of research in rural African American communities formed the theoretical and empirical foundations for the program, which focuses on delaying the onset of sexual activity and discouraging substance use among youths. The Center's researchers have formulated future directions for engaging rural families in basic research and preventive intervention programs. [source]


    Global Stakeholders: corporate accountability and investor engagement

    CORPORATE GOVERNANCE, Issue 2 2004
    Duncan McLaren
    In this age of transnational capitalism most victims of corporate malpractice have no means to hold the wrongdoers to account , especially those whose lives are blighted day-in, day-out by the "normal" operations of companies within the letter of the law. This paper argues that corporate social and environmental abuses are rooted in a lack of accountability of corporations to their stakeholders. It explores how governance mechanisms such as corporate engagement by "socially responsible" investors could enhance stakeholder accountability. It identifies and contrasts two paradigms in socially responsible investment engagement, and relates them to voluntary and regulatory responses to corporate abuses. It concludes that the development of standards for stakeholder-oriented engagement and governance could help stimulate effective regulatory measures to protect stakeholder interests. [source]


    CSR and the environment: business supply chain partnerships in Hong Kong and PRDR, China

    CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, Issue 5 2009
    Dennis K. K. Cheung
    Abstract Cross-border relocation of the production lines of Hong Kong companies to the Pearl River Delta Region (PRDR) of China relocates the pollution source geographically. In contextualizing corporate social responsibility (CSR), more and better collaborations on environmental management between Hong-Kong-based companies and their supply chains within Hong Kong and the PRDR are needed. Using a qualitative approach, this research identifies and examines nine concerned business supply chain partnership cases. Stakeholders perceived that partnership is a good tool for improving corporate environmental management. However, although it has become more active since 2002, partnership is not yet popular. More time and support are needed to develop it. Businesses should take further steps to benefit themselves and the environment. Based on the first-hand experiences and opinions of interviewees, this paper analyzes and presents recent partnership activities; their drivers and barriers; factors in their successes; and the possible roles of government and business associations in fostering partnership development. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment. [source]


    Stakeholders in Comprehensive Validation of Standards-Based Assessments: A Commentary

    EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENT: ISSUES AND PRACTICE, Issue 1 2002
    Linda Crocker
    Linda Cracker is a Professor of Educational Psychology, University ofFlorida, P.O. Box 11 7047 Gainesville, FL 32611-7043. Her areas of specialization are assessment development, validation, and test-taking behavior. [source]


    Participation of experts and non-experts in a sustainability assessment of mobility

    ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND GOVERNANCE, Issue 4 2009
    Lorraine Whitmarsh
    Abstract The complexity, ambiguity and subjectivity that surround persistent problems of unsustainability, such as mobility, highlight the importance of stakeholder engagement in both knowledge production and policy development. This paper reports on research within the EU-funded MATISSE project to develop tools and methods for Integrated Sustainability Assessment (ISA), a novel interdisciplinary and participatory approach to sustainability strategy development. Two different methods , expert focus groups and citizen deliberative workshops , were employed to elicit knowledge and preferences of European stakeholders in respect of sustainable mobility. Findings from these exercises indicate areas of both convergence and divergence in the visions of sustainable mobility futures depicted by different stakeholder groups. Stakeholders agreed on the need to address problems of unsustainability in the transport sector, and identified broadly similar environmental, social and economic criteria for sustainable transport. Amenity of transport was more important for citizens, while experts focussed on pragmatic and technological issues. Both groups favoured modal shift and novel technologies, and citizens also supported demand reduction measures and choices; however, a range of barriers to achieving sustainable mobility was also identified by participants. Stakeholder feedback suggests the process was valuable and acted as a forum for social learning and the co-production of knowledge by citizens and experts, while at the same time empowering these groups to participate in an important social issue such as transport. The value and limitations of these methods for ISA are discussed and avenues for further research proposed. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment. [source]


    Stakeholders in Universities and Colleges in Flanders

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF EDUCATION, Issue 4 2000
    Kurt De Wit
    First page of article [source]


    National pandemic influenza preparedness planning

    INFLUENZA AND OTHER RESPIRATORY VIRUSES, Issue 4 2009
    Eduardo Azziz-Baumgartner
    Abstract, The recent outbreaks of influenza A/H5N1 and ,swine influenza' A/H1N1 have caused global concern over the potential for a new influenza pandemic. Although it is impossible to predict when the next pandemic will occur, appropriate planning is still needed to maximize efficient use of resources and to minimize loss of life and productivity. Many tools now exist to assist countries in evaluating their plans but there is little to aid in writing of the plans. This study discusses the process of drafting a pandemic influenza preparedness plan for developing countries that conforms to the International Health Regulations of 2005 and recommendations of the World Health Organization. Stakeholders from many sectors should be involved in drafting a comprehensive pandemic influenza plan that addresses all levels of preparedness. [source]


    Claiming the Moral High Ground: NGOs as Stakeholders

    INTERNATIONAL STUDIES REVIEW, Issue 2 2004
    Pauline P. Cullen
    First page of article [source]


    100 years of change: examining agricultural trends, habitat change and stakeholder perceptions through the 20th century

    JOURNAL OF APPLIED ECOLOGY, Issue 2 2009
    Martin Dallimer
    Summary 1The 20th century has witnessed substantial increases in the intensity of agricultural land management, much of which has been driven by policies to enhance food security and production. The knock-on effects in agriculturally dominated landscapes include habitat degradation and biodiversity loss. We examine long-term patterns of agricultural and habitat change at a regional scale, using the Peak District of northern England as a case study. As stakeholders are central to the implementation of successful land-use policy, we also assess their perceptions of historical changes. 2In the period 1900 to 2000, there was a fivefold rise in sheep density, along with higher cattle density. We found a reduction in the number of farms, evidence of a shift in land ownership patterns, and increased agricultural specialization, including the virtual disappearance of upland arable production. 3Despite previous studies showing a substantial loss in heather cover, we found that there had been no overall change in the proportion of land covered by dwarf shrub moor. Nonetheless, turnover rates were high, with only 55% of sampled sites maintaining dwarf shrub moor coverage between 1913 and 2000. 4Stakeholders identified many of the changes revealed by the historical data, such as increased sheep numbers, fewer farms and greater specialization. However, other land-use changes were not properly described. For instance, although there had been no overall change in the proportion of dwarf shrub moor and the size of the rural labour force had not fallen, stakeholders reported a decline in both. Spatial heterogeneity of the changes, shifting baselines and problems with historical data sources might account for some of these discrepancies. 5Synthesis and applications. A marked increase in sheep numbers, combined with general agricultural intensification, have been the dominant land-use processes in the Peak District during the 20th century. Stakeholders only correctly perceived some land-use changes. Policy and management objectives should therefore be based primarily on actual historical evidence. However, understanding stakeholder perceptions and how they differ from, or agree with, the available evidence will contribute to the successful uptake of land management policies and partly determine the costs of policy implementation. [source]


    Methodology for evaluating physician order entry (POE) implementations

    JOURNAL OF EVALUATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE, Issue 4 2003
    Glen Geiger MD CM MASc BASc FRCPC
    Abstract The body of physician order entry (POE) implementations literature uses statistical evaluation methods to demonstrate changes in specified variables after POE implementation. To understand and manage the holistic impact of POE on the health care institution, a methodology that utilizes feedback to guide the POE implementation towards the satisfaction of stakeholder objectives is presented. Stakeholders jointly define quantitative and qualitative metrics for their objectives, establish target value vectors for the metrics that represent acceptable implementation outcomes and specify evaluation milestones. These are used to compare pre- and post-POE implementation clinical performance, enabling a socio-technical feedback,improvement cycle. A case study is provided to illustrate how the methodology is being used at Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Science Centre in Toronto, Canada. [source]


    Financial Reporting of Small Business Entities in Canada,

    JOURNAL OF SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2006
    Michael Maingot
    Financial reporting for small business entities (SBEs) has been the subject of much debate and concern by the accounting bodies (institutes) in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, and other countries. The main issue for the standard setters is whether they should have one set of standards for all companies or two sets of standards (one for big companies and one for SBEs). The main objective of our study is to examine whether SBEs in Canada should have their own new set of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) or should they continue to use big GAAP used by public companies. To address this issue in the Canadian environment, we sent out a questionnaire to a sample of managers and owners of small businesses, preparers, auditors, and users of small business accounts. These stakeholders were asked to identify the purposes of SBE financial statements, their levels of satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the present accounting standards for SBEs, the burdens imposed on the preparers of the financial statements, and the weaknesses of the present standards. Furthermore, they were asked to give the expected advantages of adopting new standards, after having ranked four models of financial reporting of SBEs. The results are quite interesting. Stakeholders indicated that financial statements of SBEs are prepared mainly for taxation purposes and borrowing. They are not satisfied with the present standards because they are costly to comply with and very complex. The burden of producing SBE financial statements can be reduced by simplifying the present standards. The new standards would mean a shorter and simpler form of financial statements. It is hoped that the results of this study will provide the standard setters in Canada and other countries with an indication of the future direction for SBE reporting and accounting. [source]


    Models, Assumptions, and Stakeholders: Planning for Water Supply Variability in the Colorado River Basin,

    JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN WATER RESOURCES ASSOCIATION, Issue 2 2008
    Dustin Garrick
    Abstract:, Declining reservoir storage has raised the specter of the first water shortage on the Lower Colorado River since the completion of Glen Canyon and Hoover Dams. This focusing event spurred modeling efforts to frame alternatives for managing the reservoir system during prolonged droughts. This paper addresses the management challenges that arise when using modeling tools to manage water scarcity under variable hydroclimatology, shifting use patterns, and institutional complexity. Assumptions specified in modeling simulations are an integral feature of public processes. The policymaking and management implications of assumptions are examined by analyzing four interacting sources of physical and institutional uncertainty: inflow (runoff), depletion (water use), operating rules, and initial reservoir conditions. A review of planning documents and model reports generated during two recent processes to plan for surplus and shortage in the Colorado River demonstrates that modeling tools become useful to stakeholders by clarifying the impacts of modeling assumptions at several temporal and spatial scales. A high reservoir storage-to-runoff ratio elevates the importance of assumptions regarding initial reservoir conditions over the three-year outlook used to assess the likelihood of reaching surplus and shortage triggers. An ensemble of initial condition predictions can provide more robust initial conditions estimates. This paper concludes that water managers require model outputs that encompass a full range of future potential outcomes, including best and worst cases. Further research into methods of representing and communicating about hydrologic and institutional uncertainty in model outputs will help water managers and other stakeholders to assess tradeoffs when planning for water supply variability. [source]


    Assessing the Effectiveness of Juvenile Justice Reforms: A Closer Look at the Criteria and the Impacts on Diverse Stakeholders

    LAW & POLICY, Issue 2 2000
    Daniel Mears
    Research to date has taken a relatively narrow view of the criteria by which the effectiveness of juvenile justice sentencing policies are to be assessed. This narrowness is particularly striking given the comprehensive "get tough" reforms that recently have been enacted in nearly every state. Drawing on previous research and an analysis of the potential effects of a recent juvenile justice sentencing reform in Texas, this paper argues for greater attention to conceptualizing and empirically assessing effectiveness broadly, including reference to intended and unintended effects, multiple goals and means, and diverse stakeholders. The argument is sustained first by outlining and discussing these key dimensions and then by empirically illustrating the potential importance of one of these dimensions , diverse stakeholders and their respective interests. [source]


    Evaluation of the Wonders in Nature,Wonders in Neighborhoods conservation education program: Stakeholders gone wild!

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR EVALUATION, Issue 108 2005
    Cindy Somers
    This chapter reviews the development of an evaluation system by focusing on the varied and intensive roles that stakeholders played throughout the creation of an entire evaluation process. [source]


    Is the endangered Grevy's zebra threatened by hybridization?

    ANIMAL CONSERVATION, Issue 6 2009
    J. E. Cordingley
    Abstract Hybridization between an abundant species and an endangered species is cause for concern. When such hybridization is observed, it is both urgent and necessary to assess the level of threat posed to the endangered species. We report the first evidence of natural hybridization between two equids: the endangered Grevy's zebra Equus grevyi and the abundant plains zebra Equus burchelli. Grevy's zebra now number <3000 individuals globally, and occur only in northern Kenya and Ethiopia. In recent years, Grevy's zebra have become increasingly concentrated in the south of their range due to habitat loss in the north. Both species are sympatric in the Laikipia ecosystem of northern Kenya, where we have observed purportedly hybrid individuals. Using mitochondrial and Y chromosome DNA, we confirmed the hybrid status of the morphologically identified hybrids and demonstrate conclusively that all first-generation hybrids are the offspring of plains zebra females and Grevy's zebra males. Behaviorally, hybrids integrate themselves into plains zebra society, rather than adopting the social organization of Grevy's zebra. Two hybrids have successfully raised foals to over 3 months in age, including one which has reached adulthood, indicating the fertility of female hybrids and viability of their offspring. We hypothesize that hybridization occurs due to (1) skewed sex ratios, in favor of males, within Grevy's zebra and (2) the numerical dominance of plains zebra in the region where hybridization is occurring. Stakeholders have discussed hybridization as a potential threat to Grevy's zebra survival. We argue, however, based on behavioral observations, that hybridization is unlikely to dilute the Grevy's zebra gene pool in the short term. As a conservation concern, hybridization is secondary to more direct causes of Grevy's zebra declines. [source]


    The Roles of Some Key Stakeholders in the Future of Accounting Education in Australia

    AUSTRALIAN ACCOUNTING REVIEW, Issue 3 2009
    Phil Hancock
    This article explores the role of institutional and systemic leadership in changing higher education in accounting in Australia. In particular, it discusses the roles of the Australian Learning and Teaching Council, the Australian Business Deans' Council Teaching and Learning Network, and the professional accounting bodies in meeting the challenges confronting accounting education in the tertiary sector today and in the coming years. The intersection of these leadership roles is exemplified in an accounting discipline research project that explores the critical non-technical skills stakeholders require in graduate students and discusses stakeholders' roles and responsibilities in their development. [source]


    The Need for Effective Communication with Market Stakeholders

    AUSTRALIAN ACCOUNTING REVIEW, Issue 32 2004
    Karen Hamilton
    Good corporate governance practices have become increasingly important in determining the cost of capital in global capital markets. The Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) aims to promote an environment of market confidence so that listed companies can obtain reasonably priced capital and maximise the value of their listing. As the market operator, the exchange has the ability to set and monitor disclosure standards and to support dialogue between companies and investors. However, a problem with corporate governance disclosures in Australia is that they have not delivered particularly meaningful information to investors about the performance of individual companies. [source]


    Partnering for Greater Success: Local Stakeholders and Research in Tropical Biology and Conservation

    BIOTROPICA, Issue 5 2009
    Karen A. Kainer
    ABSTRACT Local communities are important stakeholders in resource management and conservation efforts, particularly in the developing world. Although evidence is mixed in suggesting that these resident stakeholders are optimal forest stewards, it is highly unlikely that large tracts of tropical forests will be conserved without engaging local people who depend on them daily for their livelihoods. Stakeholders, who reside in biodiverse ecosystems like tropical forests, are the largest direct users and ultimate decision-makers of forest fate, can be important investors in conservation, harbor local ecological knowledge that complements Western science and frequently have long-term legitimate claims on lands where they reside. Research partnerships with local stakeholders can increase research relevance, enhance knowledge exchange and result in greater conservation success. Different phases of the research cycle present distinct opportunities for partnership, with flexibility in timing, approaches and strategies depending on researcher and local stakeholder needs and interests. Despite being the last step in the research process, dissemination of results can be the best starting point for researchers interested in experimenting with local stakeholder engagement. Still, tropical biologists might not choose to partner with local people because of lack of institutional rewards, insufficient training in stakeholder engagement, insecure research infrastructure in community settings, and time and funding limitations. Although not appropriate in all cases and despite significant challenges, some biological scientists and research institutions have successfully engaged local stakeholders in the research process, proving mutually beneficial for investigators and local people alike and resulting in important innovations in tropical biology and conservation. [source]


    Graduate Students and Knowledge Exchange with Local Stakeholders: Possibilities and Preparation

    BIOTROPICA, Issue 5 2009
    Amy E. Duchelle
    ABSTRACT Tropical biologists are exploring ways to expand their role as researchers through knowledge exchange with local stakeholders. Graduate students are well positioned for this broader role, particularly when supported by graduate programs. We ask: (1) how can graduate students effectively engage in knowledge exchange during their research; and (2) how can university programs prepare young scientists to take on this partnership role? We present a conceptual framework with three levels at which graduate students can exchange knowledge with stakeholders (information sharing, skill building, and knowledge generation) and discuss limitations of each. Examples of these strategies included disseminating preliminary research results to southern African villages, building research skills of Brazilian undergraduate students through semester-long internships, and jointly developing and implementing a forest ecology research and training program with one community in the Amazon estuary. Students chose strategies based on stakeholders' interests, research goals, and a realistic evaluation of student capacity and skill set. As strategies became more complex, time invested, skills mobilized, and strength of relationships between students and stakeholders increased. Graduate programs can prepare students for knowledge exchange with partners by developing specialized skills training, nurturing external networks, offering funding, maximizing strengths of universities in developed and developing regions through partnership, and evaluating knowledge exchange experiences. While balancing the needs of academia with those of stakeholders is challenging, the benefits of enhancing local scientific capacity and generating more locally relevant research for improved conservation may be worth the risks associated with implementing this type of graduate training model. [source]


    Bridging the Relevance Gap: Aligning Stakeholders in the Future of Management Research

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 2001
    Ken Starkey
    This report examines the relevance gap in management research. Its focus is the nature of knowledge created by research at the interface between business and academia in the context of major changes likely to affect the nature of demand for such knowledge. Management research has been accused of a lack of relevance to managerial practice and of too narrow a discipline base. The report examines the conditions giving rise to this criticism, in the UK and elsewhere, and identifies an important strategic need to increase the stakeholding of users in various aspects of the research and knowledge creation and dissemination process. The report concludes with recommendations concerning new forms of research partnership and research training that will address the relevance gap. However, bridging this gap does not only require changes in the academic mind-set. Managers and firms too need to rethink their involvement in the research process. [source]


    Taking (and Sharing Power): How Boards of Directors Can Bring About Greater Fairness for Dependent Stakeholders

    BUSINESS AND SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 2 2010
    HARRY J. VAN BUREN III
    ABSTRACT One of the ways in which scholars have sought to broaden the discussion of the social responsibilities of corporations and their managers is through the development of the stakeholder concept. The primacy of shareholder interests in corporate-governance processes and managerial action is, however, a myth that justifies all sorts of managerial self-interest seeking and exploitation of particular stakeholder groups. What makes this myth particularly problematic,from the standpoint of fairness and corporate governance,is that not all nonshareholder stakeholders are equally situated with regard to their ability to secure fair treatment. In this article, I explore the ethical dimensions of board responsibilities to dependent stakeholder groups by first describing the differences between shareholders and nonshareholder stakeholders with regard to risk, examining why dependent stakeholders (stakeholders with legitimate and urgent claims, but no power) are particularly important from the standpoint of stakeholder risk, and discussing how stakeholder consultation might provide a partial fix to such problems. I will conclude with proposals for how boards can more faithfully discharge their ethical responsibilities to dependent stakeholder groups, and in so doing facilitate stakeholder involvement in corporate governance in ways that promote fairness in organization,stakeholder relationships. [source]


    Engaging Stakeholders in Corporate Environmental Governance

    BUSINESS AND SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 1 2007
    LISE BACKER
    First page of article [source]


    Speaking Truth to Power: Religious Institutions as Both Dissident Organizational Stakeholders and Organizational Partners

    BUSINESS AND SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 1 2007
    HARRY J. VAN BUREN III
    First page of article [source]


    The Role and Potential of Stakeholders in "Hollow Participation": Conventional Stakeholder Theory and Institutionalist Alternatives

    BUSINESS AND SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 2 2003
    Kamel Mellahi
    First page of article [source]


    The Importance of Stakeholders According to Business Leaders

    BUSINESS AND SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 1 2001
    Michelle Greenwood
    First page of article [source]


    Expanding Accountability to Stakeholders: Trends and Predictions

    BUSINESS AND SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 4 2000
    Jeanne M. Logsdon
    [source]


    Stakeholders and environmental management practices: an institutional framework

    BUSINESS STRATEGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, Issue 4 2004
    Magali Delmas
    Despite burgeoning research on companies' environmental strategies and environmental management practices, it remains unclear why some firms adopt environmental management practices beyond regulatory compliance. This paper leverages institutional theory by proposing that stakeholders , including governments, regulators, customers, competitors, community and environmental interest groups, and industry associations , impose coercive and normative pressures on firms. However, the way in which managers perceive and act upon these pressures at the plant level depends upon plant- and parent-company-specific factors, including their track record of environmental performance, the competitive position of the parent company and the organizational structure of the plant. Beyond providing a framework of how institutional pressures influence plants' environmental management practices, various measures are proposed to quantify institutional pressures, key plant-level and parent-company-level characteristics and plant-level environmental management practices. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment. [source]


    Reconstructing ripeness II: Models and methods for fostering constructive stakeholder engagement across protracted divides

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2008
    Peter T. Coleman
    A priority objective for diplomats, mediators, negotiators, and other individuals working to rectify seemingly intractable conflicts is to help foster stakeholder "ripeness," or a willingness and commitment to engage constructively in the conflict. This is often extremely difficult to achieve due to long histories between the parties of animosity, suspicion, hostility, and fear. Ripeness theory has been a useful starting point for understanding such motives, but has limited explanatory power under conditions of intractable conflict. The second in a two-part series, this article outlines the implications for practice resulting from an analysis of interviews with expert scholar-practitioners working in the field with intractable conflicts. [source]


    Project PASCALEA , public and stakeholder consultation in developing high-profile corporate environmental strategy

    CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, Issue 2 2004
    Linda Collins
    This paper looks at corporate social responsibility in the context of public and stakeholder dialogue and engagement. It demonstrates how this can contribute to the development of a long-term environmental management strategy. It shows how government, stakeholder and economic pressure can encourage companies to positively engage their stakeholders. Using an example from the nuclear industry the paper describes how the importance of engaging in stakeholder dialogue and consultation has been recognized and how this can contribute to more positive stakeholder relationships. In 2002, AWE plc commissioned a major independent public and stakeholder consultation exercise (Project PASCALEA). Environmental Consultants from NNC Ltd. were commissioned to manage and execute the project, together with recognized consultation specialists from the IEPPP, Lancaster University. The case study gives an insight into the consultation methodology adopted and evaluates how the outcomes from the project contributed towards the successful delivery of AWE's corporate environmental management goals. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment. [source]


    Stakeholder accountability or stakeholder management: a review of UK firms' social and ethical accounting, auditing and reporting (SEAAR) practices

    CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, Issue 1 2002
    Ataur Rahman Belal
    The main aim of this study is to undertake an evaluation of the initial wave of stand-alone social reports issued by the major market players in the UK using AA1000 as an evaluative tool, or benchmark, in order to ascertain the extent to which they conform to the provisions of AA1000, in particular the core principles of accountability and inclusivity. Applying the lens of the stakeholder model the paper examines to what extent contemporary SEAAR practices in the UK are likely to promote stakeholder accountability, or whether they are simply exercises in stakeholder management. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment. [source]