Space

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Space

  • accommodation space
  • active space
  • air space
  • airway space
  • alternative space
  • alveolar space
  • analytical space
  • annular space
  • approximation space
  • available space
  • banach space
  • besov space
  • bronchoalveolar space
  • buffer space
  • canal space
  • chemical space
  • color space
  • colour space
  • common space
  • complex space
  • composition space
  • configuration space
  • confined space
  • conformational space
  • control space
  • convex space
  • cultural space
  • cystic space
  • data space
  • dead space
  • design space
  • different space
  • dimensional space
  • direct space
  • discrete space
  • discursive space
  • domestic space
  • edentulous space
  • element space
  • empty space
  • enemy-free space
  • environmental space
  • epidural space
  • euclidean space
  • extracellular space
  • feature space
  • finite element space
  • first web space
  • fluid space
  • free space
  • function space
  • functional space
  • geographic space
  • geographical space
  • global space
  • green space
  • half space
  • hardy space
  • hilbert space
  • hollow space
  • inner space
  • input space
  • institutional space
  • intercellular space
  • intercostal space
  • interior space
  • interlayer space
  • intermembrane space
  • internal space
  • interstellar space
  • interstitial space
  • intracellular space
  • joint space
  • learning space
  • limited space
  • little space
  • local space
  • lp space
  • marrow space
  • metric space
  • metropolitan space
  • minkowski space
  • mitochondrial intermembrane space
  • modal space
  • model space
  • momentum space
  • narrow space
  • native space
  • new space
  • niche space
  • null space
  • open space
  • ordination space
  • orlicz space
  • outer space
  • parameter space
  • parapharyngeal space
  • pericardial space
  • periplasmic space
  • perivascular space
  • personal space
  • phase space
  • physical space
  • pleural space
  • policy space
  • political space
  • pore space
  • posterior airway space
  • potential space
  • preperitoneal space
  • private space
  • product space
  • property space
  • public space
  • reaction space
  • real space
  • reciprocal space
  • redshift space
  • restricted space
  • retroperitoneal space
  • ritual space
  • rural space
  • sacred space
  • safe space
  • sample space
  • search space
  • sequence space
  • signal space
  • sobolev space
  • social space
  • solution space
  • state space
  • storage space
  • stress space
  • subarachnoid space
  • subretinal space
  • three-dimensional space
  • transnational space
  • two-dimensional space
  • urban space
  • variable space
  • vascular space
  • vector space
  • virtual space
  • void space
  • web space
  • weighted sobolev space
  • whole space
  • work space

  • Terms modified by Space

  • space agency
  • space analysis
  • space approach
  • space area
  • space available
  • space center
  • space charge
  • space charge limited current
  • space complexity
  • space constraint
  • space data
  • space density
  • space dimension
  • space discretization
  • space domain
  • space environment
  • space exploration
  • space form
  • space formulation
  • space group
  • space group c
  • space group c2
  • space group c2221
  • space group p
  • space group p.
  • space group p1
  • space group p2
  • space group p21
  • space group p21212
  • space group p212121
  • space group p3121
  • space group p41212
  • space group r3
  • space groups
  • space h
  • space limitation
  • space lp
  • space map
  • space mapping
  • space measurement
  • space methods
  • space mission
  • space model
  • space models
  • space narrowing
  • space occupying lesion
  • space preparation
  • space representation
  • space sampling
  • space scale
  • space self-consistent field
  • space station
  • space structure
  • space system
  • space telescope
  • space telescope observation
  • space time
  • space use
  • space variable
  • space vector modulation
  • space velocity
  • space width
  • space x

  • Selected Abstracts


    THE SCHOOL AS AN EXCEPTIONAL SPACE: RETHINKING EDUCATION FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE BIOPEDAGOGICAL

    EDUCATIONAL THEORY, Issue 2 2006
    Tyson E. LewisArticle first published online: 3 MAY 200
    Agamben's theory of the camp provides a challenging, critical vantage point for looking at the ambiguities that emerge from the complex field of disciplinary procedures now prevalent in inner-city, low-income, minority schools, and helps to clarify what exactly is at stake in the symbolic and sometimes physical violence of schooling. Key to understanding the primary relation between camp and classroom is Agamben's framework of the biopolitical, which paradoxically includes life as a political concern through its exclusion from the political sphere. Here Lewis appropriates Agamben's terminology in order to theorize the biopedagogical, wherein educational life is included in schooling through its abandonment. For Lewis, the theory of the camp is necessary to recognizing how schools function and, in turn, how they could function differently. [source]


    043.06 VESTIBULAR INTEGRATION CONTRIBUTES TO THE REPRESENTATION OF SPACE

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE, Issue 9 2000
    J. Ventre-Dominey
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    BEHAVIORAL ADAPTATIONS INCREASE THE VALUE OF ENEMY-FREE SPACE FOR HELIOTHIS SUBFLEXA, A SPECIALIST HERBIVORE

    EVOLUTION, Issue 4 2002
    Sara J. Oppenheim
    Abstract We investigated the importance of specialized behaviors in the use of enemy-free space by comparing the host-use behavior of two closely related moths, Heliothis subflexa Guenee and H. virescens Fabricius. Heliothis subflexa is a specialist on plants in the genus Physalis, whereas H. virescens is an extreme generalist, feeding on plants in at least 14 families. Heliothis subflexa uses the inflated calyx surrounding Physalis fruits as enemy-free space, and field rates of parasitism for H. subflexa on Physalis are much lower than for H. virescens on tobacco and cotton, common hosts found in the same habitat as Physalis. If Physalis' architecture were solely responsible for H. subflexa's low rates of parasitism on Physalis, we predicted thatH. virescens larvae experimentally induced to feed on Physalis would experience parasitism rates similar to those ofH. subflexa. We found, however, that specialized host-use and host-acceptance behaviors are integral to the use of enemy-free space on Physalis and strongly augment the effects of the structural refuge. In laboratory assays, we found considerable differences between the larval behavior of the specialist, H. subflexa, and the generalist, H. virescens, and these contributed to H. subflexa's superior use of enemy-free space on Physalis. We tested the importance of these behavioral differences in the field by comparing parasitism of H. virescens on Physalis, H. virescens on tobacco, and H. subflexa on Physalis by Cardiochiles nigriceps Vierick, a specialist braconid parasitoid. For H. virescens, a threefold decrease in parasitism occurred when feeding on Physalis (mean parasitism SEM = 13 4%) rather than tobacco (43 4%), a difference we attribute to the structural refuge provided by Physalis. However, parasitism ofH. virescens on Physalis was more than ten times as great as that of H. subflexa on Physalis (1 4%), supporting the hypothesis that specialized behaviors have a substantial impact on use of Physalis as enemy-free space. Behavioral adaptations may be central to the use of enemy-free space by phytophagous insects and may act as an important selective force in the evolution of dietary specialization. [source]


    MODAL SPACE: What is the Difference Between all the Mode Indicator Functions?

    EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUES, Issue 2 2007
    What Do They all Do?
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    MODAL SPACE: Is There Any Problem Running a Modal Test to 2 KHz but Only Analyzing up to 500 Hz?

    EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUES, Issue 4 2006
    Pete Avitabile
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Solid-phase aroma concentrate extraction (SPACE ): a new headspace technique for more sensitive analysis of volatiles

    FLAVOUR AND FRAGRANCE JOURNAL, Issue 3 2004
    Masashi Ishikawa
    Abstract The SPACE (solid-phase aroma concentrate extraction) method is a modi,ed version of the SPME (solid-phase micro extraction) technique for headspace analysis, with increased area of the adsorbent to enable more sensitive analysis of volatiles. The SPACE rod used in the technique is fabricated from stainless steel coated with an adsorbent mixture, consisting mainly of a graphite carbon. Initially, the SPACE rod is ,xed in the head of a closed ,ask, where it adsorbs the aroma. Next, the rod is thermally desorbed on-line with a high-resolution gas chromatography,mass spectrometer (HRGC,MS). In the present experiments, SPACE sampling reproducibility was determined by analysing a standard mixture and roasted coffee beans. The SPACE rod collected the analytes with good reproducibility, with the exception of high polar compounds. Similar analyses of coffee powder were performed by SPME and other methods for comparison with the SPACE method. The SPACE method proved to have superior capabilities with high concentrations, and it produced a well-balanced chromatogram. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    THE AIRPORT HOTEL AS BUSINESS SPACE

    GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES B: HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, Issue 3 2009
    Donald McNeill
    ABSTRACT. This article seeks to contribute to debates about the mobile nature of contemporary economic practice, through a discussion of some key themes in the evolution of airport hotels as business spaces. It argues that despite being emblematic of a hypermobile business elite, the nature of hotels as business spaces requires careful unpacking. The article begins by discussing the evolution of the airport hotel, charting the shift from basic lodging standards to recent developments of five star airport hotels. It then seeks to explain the locational geographies of airport hotel development, in response to these new trends. Finally, the article describes how the business traveller is conceived of and (speculatively) catered for by airport hotel operators and designers within a discourse of connectivity, before providing some counter-examples of how such claims fail to address the hotel's place within the complexity of airport spatial organization. [source]


    DOES DIVERSITY IN URBAN SPACE ENHANCE INTERGROUP CONTACT AND TOLERANCE?

    GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES B: HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, Issue 1 2009
    Terje Wessel
    ABSTRACT. Contemporary urban theory has started to question the elevation of diversity as a panacea for enduring urban problems , segregation, prejudice and intergroup hostility. This critique coincides with an opposite tendency within classic contact theory and research. The latter tradition has developed an increasing enthusiasm for face-to-face interaction. The contact hypothesis, which presupposes established contact, has received conclusive support independent of target groups and contact settings. Research on ,lived diversity', which includes both contact and lack of contact, offers two supplementary insights. It shows, on the one hand, that boundaries are inscribed in social spaces. Physical proximity between ethnic and social groups tends to have a minor effect on interaction. Interaction, on the other hand, is not essential to attitude formation. Both subfields within contact research have confirmed that urban space may act as a catalyst for tolerant attitudes. This observation corresponds with increasing recognition of affective states, such as empathy, anxiety and group threat. Contact research has therefore, in summary, transcended the scope of the contact hypothesis. It has expanded into the realm of urban theory, which foreshadows future collaboration between the two traditions. Some key points for such exchange are suggested at the end of the article. Future research should combine an open-ended approach to casual contact with a diversified conception of diversity and a richer conception of urban space. A move in this direction would leave substantial space for geographical research. [source]


    A SANCTUARY IN POST-CONFLICT SPACE: THE BAPTIST CHURCH AS A ,MIDDLE OPTION' IN BANOVINA, CROATIA

    GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES B: HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, Issue 1 2009
    Reinhard Henkel
    ABSTRACT. One of the observable aspects of social change during the transition period in most post-socialist countries is the revival of religion. The resurgence of churches has accompanied national revival and in some countries it is also connected to a growing post-socialist nationalism. This article focuses on the development of different ,,transnational', religious options in an area of ethnic conflict by presenting a case study of the post-war growth of the Baptist Church in the Banovina region in Croatia, close to the Bosnian border. Research results are based on halfstructured interviews with church representatives and members. The research shows that there has been a considerable post-war expansion of the Baptist Church in the Banovina region, and that it is mainly ethnic Serbs and people from mixed marriages who have joined the Church. Many of them have a background as communists. For them, neither the Catholic Church, which is regarded as a Croatian church, nor the Serbian Orthodox Church are viable religious options. Instead, there are three factors that make the ,Baptist option' attractive. First, it is grounded in the historical tradition of the Baptist Church in this region and on memories and myths activated in the war and post-war periods. Second, the Baptist Church has made a middle transnational option available in an ethnically mixed area. As such it attracts those who are searching for a niche of neutrality in an ethnically strongly divided region characterized by conflict. Third, the considerable humanitarian work and help of organizations related to the Baptist Church during and after the war not only added in the eyes of many people in need to its image elements of existential shelter, but also brought the Church out of the shadows and made it more ,visible', thereby improving its former reputation as an obscure sect. [source]


    PARADES, PUBLIC SPACE, AND PROPAGANDA: THE NAZI CULTURE PARADES IN MUNICH

    GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES B: HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, Issue 4 2008
    Joshua Hagen
    ABSTRACT. As the birthplace of the Nazi Party and the official Capital of the Movement, Munich assumed a high profile within the party's propaganda apparatus. While Berlin became the political and foreign policy centre of Hitler's Reich and Nuremberg the site of massive displays of national power during the annual party rallies, national and local party leaders launched a series of cultural initiatives to showcase Munich as the Capital of German Art. Munich hosted numerous festivals proclaiming a rebirth of German art and culture, as well as the regime's supposedly peaceful intentions for domestic and international audiences. To help achieve these goals, Nazi leaders staged a series of extravagant parades in Munich celebrating German cultural achievements. The parades provided an opportunity for the regime to monopolize Munich's public spaces through performances of its particular vision of German history, culture and national belonging. While such mass public spectacles had obvious propaganda potential, several constraints, most prominently Munich's existing spatial layout, limited the parades' effectiveness. [source]


    HOW CHILDREN PLACE THEMSELVES AND OTHERS IN LOCAL SPACE

    GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES B: HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, Issue 3 2008
    Danielle Van Der Burgt
    ABSTRACT This study examines the ways in which children aged 11 to 15 in six adjacent neighbourhoods in a medium-sized Swedish town place themselves and others in local space. Special attention is given to how they discuss a neighbourhood stigmatized in the public discourse and how children who live in this neighbourhood react to the negative representations of the place in which they live. The study is based on group interviews and maps. The study shows that children construct representations of their own neighbourhoods as "quiet" neighbourhoods and place objects of "trouble" and "danger" somewhere else. It is argued that this is done both in relation to their personal knowledge of the neighbourhood and in relation to local and/or media representations of their own and other neighbourhoods. It is shown that the children are influenced by media representations of a stigmatized neighbourhood, but also that they are not passive reproducers of these discourses and that some of them are able to offer counter-discourses. The children living in this neighbourhood experience difficulties in defending it as the quiet place which they perceive it to be to outsiders because of the negative discourses. [source]


    MAKING SUSTAINABLE CREATIVE/CULTURAL SPACE IN SHANGHAI AND SINGAPORE,

    GEOGRAPHICAL REVIEW, Issue 1 2009
    LILY KONG
    ABSTRACT. Shanghai and Singapore are two economically vibrant Asian cities that have recently adopted creative/cultural economy strategies. In this article I examine new spatial expressions of cultural and economic interests in the two cities: state-vaunted cultural edifices and organically evolved cultural spaces. I discuss the simultaneous precariousness and sustainability of these spaces, focusing on Shanghai's Grand Theatre and Moganshan Lu and on Singapore's Esplanade,Theatres by the Bay and Wessex Estate. Their cultural sustainability is understood as their ability to support the development of indigenous content and local idioms in artistic work. Their social sustainability is examined in terms of the social inclusion and community bonds they engender; environmental sustainability refers to the articulation with the language of existing urban forms and the preservation of or improvements to the landscape. Although both Shanghai and Singapore demonstrate simultaneous precariousness and sustainability, Singapore's city-state status places greater pressure on it to ensure sustainability than does Shanghai, within a much larger China in which Beijing serves as the cultural hearth while Shanghai remains essentially a commercial center. [source]


    THEIR SPACE: SECURITY AND SERVICE WORKERS IN A BRAZILIAN GATED COMMUNITY,

    GEOGRAPHICAL REVIEW, Issue 4 2008
    JACQUELYN CHASE
    ABSTRACT. This study examines the role of service workers in creating a secure landscape in a zone of gated communities near Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Most research on gated communities emphasizes their segregation and formal security apparatuses. In fact, gated communities interact with surrounding rural settlements because they draw their service employees from them. Security emerges from informal relationships of trust that property owners establish with service workers. Gardeners, especially, enable homeowners to project their property investment to others through landscaping. Equally of importance, a manicured garden conveys the message that a home is receiving daily attention,and is secure,even if the owner is not present. The study probes this interdependence from the point of view of gardeners in the context of one gated community in an area south of Belo Horizonte and the attempts by members of its homeowners association to minimize the sense of fear they associate with the Brazilian city. [source]


    WOMEN, RELIGION, AND SPACE: GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES ON GENDER AND FAITH edited by Karen M. Morin and Jeanne Kay Guelke

    JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENTIFIC STUDY OF RELIGION, Issue 3 2008
    JENNIFER MCKINNEY
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    IN THE SPACE BETWEEN PEOPLE: SEIKKULA'S OPEN DIALOGUE APPROACH

    JOURNAL OF MARITAL AND FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 3 2002
    Harlene Anderson
    [source]


    ECONOMIC VALUATION OF RIPARIAN BUFFER AND OPEN SPACE IN A SUBURBAN WATERSHED1

    JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN WATER RESOURCES ASSOCIATION, Issue 6 2006
    Zeyuan Qiu
    Abstract: This study evaluates the economic value of riparian buffers and open space in a suburban watershed through two nonmarket valuation methods. A contingent valuation survey was implemented in the Dardenne Creek watershed, a suburban watershed of the St. Louis metropolitan area in Missouri, to evaluate the residents' perceptions of and willingness to pay (WTP) for adopting riparian buffers and preserving farmland in a hypothetical real estate market. A hedonic pricing model based on actual sale prices of homes in the watershed was applied to estimate the market value of open space and other environmental conditions such as flood zone and stream proximity in the study area. The results showed that residents' WTP was consistent with the economic values of open space and proximity to streams embedded in existing home prices. Through a better understanding of residents' perceptions and values, riparian buffer and open space programs can be designed and promoted to achieve greater implementation success and environmental benefit. [source]


    SOCIAL ORGANIZATION AND HUMAN SPACE IN NORTH-EASTERN IBERIA DURING THE THIRD CENTURY BC

    OXFORD JOURNAL OF ARCHAEOLOGY, Issue 4 2008
    CARME RUESTES
    Summary By using GIS (Geographical Information System) visibility analysis, the visual surveillance of, and ways in which people engaged and experienced, an Iberian landscape north of Barcelona during the third century BC are explored. The study of visual surveillance from the hillforts that dominated the area is understood as a means to address issues of social structure and hierarchy. How Iberian people might have viewed and rationalized their world, which is an issue that has so far not been addressed within the theoretical approaches that currently characterize this area of Mediterranean archaeology, is explored here for the first time. Emphasis is placed on people's sense of place and on hillforts' prominence. Visibility analysis indicates a highly structured society, where each hillfort might have primarily controlled given zones of the landscape and might have informed others about events taking place there through an integrated visibility network. Whilst hillforts appear to have been sited according to the view that they offered, they do not seem to have been intended to maximize their own visual impact. Social and experiential approaches compellingly coincide to suggest a subdivision of this society between mountain and coastal communities in both practical and perceptual terms. [source]


    MORE THAN ONE WAY TO STUDY A BUILDING: APPROACHES TO PREHISTORIC HOUSEHOLD AND SETTLEMENT SPACE

    OXFORD JOURNAL OF ARCHAEOLOGY, Issue 3 2006
    MARION CUTTING
    Summary. This article reviews a number of research methodologies used to record household and settlement architecture and assesses their value in the investigation of the human use of prehistoric built space. It exemplifies, through case studies, five broad approaches to, and research techniques associated with, the investigation of such architecture. These approaches are: architectural form; the spatial distribution of activities; continuity and standardization; the relationship between built and non-built space; and human patterns of movement. Then, drawing mainly on Near Eastern, and particularly Anatolian, material, it shows how a sixth approach, the use of ethnographic observation and analogy, provides insights into functional and seasonal variations in spatial use, patterns of movement and social organization. It identifies seven categories of data collection and nine observations drawn from the ethnographic material which together provide an investigative and interpretative framework for the study of early farming communities in the Near East and elsewhere. [source]


    HETEROGENEOUS SPACE IN REGIONAL ECONOMICS AND BEYOND

    PACIFIC ECONOMIC REVIEW, Issue 4 2006
    John G. Greenhut
    Such space clearly applies to a regional economy where costly distance provides opportunities for sellers to discriminate in price among customers. Similar discriminatory opportunities may be created in a spaceless world through, for example, product differentiation and the passage of time. It is in this broad perspective that a generalized theory of discriminatory spatial pricing is formulated. Simulations reveal a remarkable panoply of cost, price, and output relationships, highlighting the criticality of variations in elasticity in determining macro, micro, and regional economic behaviour. [source]


    SPACE,TIME MODELLING OF SYDNEY HARBOUR WINDS

    AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF STATISTICS, Issue 1 2005
    Edward Cripps
    Summary This paper develops a space-time statistical model for local forecasting of surface-level wind fields in a coastal region with complex topography. The statistical model makes use of output from deterministic numerical weather prediction models which are able to produce forecasts of surface wind fields on a spatial grid. When predicting surface winds at observing stations, errors can arise due to sub-grid scale processes not adequately captured by the numerical weather prediction model, and the statistical model attempts to correct for these influences. In particular, it uses information from observing stations within the study region as well as topographic information to account for local bias. Bayesian methods for inference are used in the model, with computations carried out using Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms. Empirical performance of the model is described, illustrating that a structured Bayesian approach to complicated space-time models of the type considered in this paper can be readily implemented and can lead to improvements in forecasting over traditional methods. [source]


    GEOGRAPHICAL SPACE AND EFFECTIVE DEMAND UNDER STAGNATION

    AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC PAPERS, Issue 4 2006
    WATARU JOHDO
    This paper investigates the adjustment mechanism between geographical space and effective demand under stagnation by constructing a spatial model with stagnation included. The model takes the idea of stagnation in Ono (2001) and combines it with the spatial model of Perera-Tallo (2003). The spatial model features local monopolists that import intermediate goods from other monopolists at a cost that can be decreased through investment. Using the integrated model, we reach the following conclusion: the wider the geographical space, the lower the effective demand under stagnation. This mechanism is explained as follows. Under stagnation, where demand has reached an upper bound, a decrease in the marginal cost of reaching distant intermediate suppliers reduces employment. The reason is ,love of variety' in production: for given final output, more variety of available intermediate inputs crowds out per-variety demand of intermediates and thus employment. Decreases in employment then lead to a decrease in the rate of time preference through a rise in the deflation rate, and thereby decrease the desire for consumption, consequently cutting effective demand. [source]


    LIFE-CENTERED ETHICS, AND THE HUMAN FUTURE IN SPACE

    BIOETHICS, Issue 8 2009
    MICHAEL N. MAUTNER
    ABSTRACT In the future, human destiny may depend on our ethics. In particular, biotechnology and expansion in space can transform life, raising profound questions. Guidance may be found in Life-centered ethics, as biotic ethics that value the basic patterns of organic gene/protein life, and as panbiotic ethics that always seek to expand life. These life-centered principles can be based on scientific insights into the unique place of life in nature, and the biological unity of all life. Belonging to life then implies a human purpose: to safeguard and propagate life. Expansion in space will advance this purpose but will also raise basic questions. Should we expand all life or only intelligent life? Should we aim to create populations of trillions? Should we seed other solar systems? How far can we change but still preserve the human species, and life itself? The future of all life may be in our hands, and it can depend on our guiding ethics whether life will fulfil its full potentials. Given such profound powers, life-centered ethics can best secure future generations. Our descendants may then understand nature more deeply, and seek to extend life indefinitely. In that future, our human existence can find a cosmic purpose. [source]


    THEORIZING GLOBAL BUSINESS SPACES

    GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES B: HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, Issue 3 2009
    Andrew Jones
    ABSTRACT. Over the last decade, geographers have paid a great deal of attention to transnational firms (TNCs) and global production networks (GPNs) in the global economy, to the emergence of a mobile transnational business class and also to the development of global or globalizing cities. All three literatures have made important contributions to understanding the spatiality of global economic activity, but each adopts a fairly discreet theoretical and empirical focus. This article aims to outline a number of theoretical dimensions for thinking about how these key strands to the globalization debate can be brought together through the concept of global business spaces. It will propose a framework for understanding the spatialities of global economic activity that seeks to capture the complex interaction of material, social, organizational and virtual spaces that form the context through which it is constituted. With reference to business travel as a key form of economic practice which plays a central role in (re)producing these spaces, it assesses how these emerging spaces of global economic activity present problems for the conceptual categories commonly used by both urban and economic geographers. In so doing, it proposes a series of ways in which a different research agenda can produce new insight into the complex forms of social practice at the centre of global economic activity. [source]


    SPACES OF DIZZINESS AND DREAD: NAVIGATING ACROPHOBIA

    GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES B: HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, Issue 4 2007
    Gavin J. Andrews
    ABSTRACT As part of emerging disciplinary interests in well-being and emotions, geographers have recently begun to pay attention to common but often neglected psychological conditions that have the potential to impact considerably upon individuals and their daily lives. Specifically extending the scope of geographical inquiry on phobias, this paper considers acrophobia (known as being scared of heights). Through interviews with ten sufferers, the spatial character and intensity of the condition is articulated. The findings tell us that underpinning acrophobia is mathematical height: the vertical elevation from the lowest possible resting point of the body to the point at which the symptoms of acrophobia occur. This point is however - even for each individual - highly variable, context dependant and, in terms of explanatory potential, does not convey personal experiences. Instead, the idea of ,encounter spaces' provides far greater elaboration. Created by sufferers ,dysfunctional' spatial perceptions, these are the occupied spaces of mixed emotional and physical responses (such as fear and rapid breathing) and reactionary practices that are tactical yet somewhat involuntary in nature (such as gripping tighter or getting lower). Depending on the particular circumstances, sufferers might choose to, feel forced to, or might inadvertently enter encounter spaces. Their impacts also extend beyond immediate effects to sufferers' longer term lives and well-being. This might be negatively impacted, for example, through cumulative encounters, worrying about potential encounters or missing out on life events. At this level, reactionary practices - again which are tactical yet somewhat involuntary - are often employed in order to avoid height. Ultimately, the overall impact of acrophobia on an individual depends on a number of factors including the severity of their condition, the attitudes of the people they associate with, their job, lifestyle and the environments which they have to, or would like to, frequent. Consequently, while some sufferers cope with ease, others constantly navigate the altitude of their lives. [source]


    ALGONQUIN NOTIONS OF JURISDICTION: INSERTING INDIGENOUS VOICES INTO LEGAL SPACES

    GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES B: HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, Issue 3 2006
    Bettina Koschade
    ABSTRACT. Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal notions of geography, nature and space sometimes compete, and these differences can create barriers to joint environmental problem-solving. This paper examines the Ardoch Algonquin First Nation and Allies (AAFNA) and the strategies they used in juridical and legislative settings to make their voices heard. In the Tay River Ontario Environmental Review Tribunal (2000,2002), AAFNA attempted to introduced their knowledge of the environmental deterioration which would be caused by a Permit To Take Water issued to a multinational corporation by the Ontario Ministry of Environment. The paper is divided into two parts: first, it describes the concepts of Algonquin knowledge, jurisdiction and responsibility; second, it explores the strategies used to integrate their perspective into legal proceedings constructed by the Canadian government. This case reveals how some Algonquin people conceive of space and responsibility in deeply ecological, rather than narrowly juridical, terms. It establishes that their broad concepts of knowledge, land and jurisdiction are incompatible with existing Euro-Canadian divisions of legal responsibility and ecological knowledge, but at the same time can serve as the means by which they challenge the current structure of Aboriginal and Canadian relations. [source]


    THE REDISCOVERY OF AMERICAN SACRED SPACES

    RELIGIOUS STUDIES REVIEW, Issue 4 2004
    Louis P. Nelson
    Book reviewed in this article: THE HERMENEUTICS OF SACRED ARCHITECTURE: EXPERIENCE, INTERPRETATION, COMPARISON (2 volumes) By Lindsay Jones TEMPLES OF GRACE: THE MATERIAL TRANSFORMATION OF CONNECTICUT'S CHURCHES, 1790,1840 By Gretchen Buggeln WHEN CHURCH BECAME THEATRE: THE TRANSFORMATION OF EVANGELICAL ARCHITECTURE AND WORSHIP IN THE NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICA By Jeanne Kilde PRAYERS IN STONE: CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ARCHITECTURE IN THE UNITED STATES, 1894,1930 By Paul Eli Ivey SHUL WITH A POOL: THE "SYNAGOGUE-CENTER" IN AMERICAN JEWISH HISTORY By David Kaufman MYTHS IN STONE: RELIGIOUS DIMENSIONS OF WASHINGTON, D.C. By Jeffrey F. Meyer UGLY AS SIN: WHY THEY CHANGED OUR CHURCHES FROM SACRED PLACES TO MEETING SPACES AND HOW WE CAN CHANGE THEM BACK AGAIN By Michael S. Rose BUILDING FROM BELIEF: ADVANCE, RETREAT, AND COMPROMISE IN THE REMAKING OF CATHOLIC CHURCH ARCHITECTURE By Michael E. DeSanctis ARCHITECTURE IN COMMUNION: IMPLEMENTING THE SECOND VATICAN COUNCIL THROUGH LITURGY AND ARCHITECTURE By Steven J. Schloeder [source]


    THE SERIAL SPACES OF ANA MENDIETA

    ART HISTORY, Issue 1 2007
    SUSAN BEST
    The work of the Cuban American artist Ana Mendieta has often been criticized for embracing the traditional alignment of woman and nature, an alignment which is generally perceived as reliant upon essentialist ideas about female identity. Recent commentators have defended Mendieta's work against the charge of essentialism by interpreting her work through the lens of Judith Butler's idea of gender as performance. Mendieta's work, it is argued, destabilizes identity by emphasizing the repeated performances of this alignment. In other words, the emphasis falls on the ,deed' rather than the ,doer', to use Butler's terms. While the capacity of Mendieta's work to sustain these different readings points to its richness, essentialism still remains a scare term, despite feminist literature from the 1980s and 1990s. This article considers Mendieta's Silueta series in the light of this reconsideration of essentialism. [source]


    ON THE STRONG LAW OF LARGE NUMBERS UNDER REARRANGEMENTS FOR SEQUENCES OF BLOCKWISE ORTHOGONAL RANDOM ELEMENTS IN BANACH SPACES

    AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF STATISTICS, Issue 4 2007
    Nguyen Van Quang
    Summary The condition of the strong law of large numbers is obtained for sequences of random elements in type p Banach spaces that are blockwise orthogonal. The current work extends a result of Chobanyan & Mandrekar (2000)[On Kolmogorov SLLN under rearrangements for orthogonal random variables in a B -space. J. Theoret. Probab. 13, 135,139.] Special cases of the main results are presented as corollaries, and illustrative examples are provided. [source]


    Reinterpretable Imager: Towards Variable Post-Capture Space, Angle and Time Resolution in Photography

    COMPUTER GRAPHICS FORUM, Issue 2 2010
    Amit Agrawal
    Abstract We describe a novel multiplexing approach to achieve tradeoffs in space, angle and time resolution in photography. We explore the problem of mapping useful subsets of time-varying 4D lightfields in a single snapshot. Our design is based on using a dynamic mask in the aperture and a static mask close to the sensor. The key idea is to exploit scene-specific redundancy along spatial, angular and temporal dimensions and to provide a programmable or variable resolution tradeoff among these dimensions. This allows a user to reinterpret the single captured photo as either a high spatial resolution image, a refocusable image stack or a video for different parts of the scene in post-processing. A lightfield camera or a video camera forces a-priori choice in space-angle-time resolution. We demonstrate a single prototype which provides flexible post-capture abilities not possible using either a single-shot lightfield camera or a multi-frame video camera. We show several novel results including digital refocusing on objects moving in depth and capturing multiple facial expressions in a single photo. [source]


    Cyclotron Maser Radiation in Space and Laboratory Plasmas

    CONTRIBUTIONS TO PLASMA PHYSICS, Issue 5-6 2004
    R. Bingham
    Abstract One of the best known coherent radio emission mechanisms is the electron cyclotron maser instability. In this article we will demonstrate that electron cyclotron maser emission is directly associated with particular types of charged particle acceleration and propagation in space and laboratory plasmas. These include electron ring distributions, horseshoe or crescent shaped electron distribution functions. Planetary and stellarmagnetospheres are examples of where horseshoe or crescent shaped electron distributions can be found and astrophysical shocks produce ring shaped electron distribution functions. In the laboratory horseshoe or crescent shaped distributions are produced whenever an electron beam propagates into a stronger magnetic field region. ( 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim) [source]